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This topic contains 11 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by durecellrabbit durecellrabbit 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #73647
    Angel Barracks
    Angel Barracks
    Moderator

    I struggle to find any hobby podcasts that I enjoy.
    I had been pondering this for a while then it hit me.

    The majority of ones that I have tried have been discussion/interview style ones.
    I have found that they are too amateurish.
    I don’t mean that in a negative way as such, but an interview style media piece can be messy when not done by a media professional.
    The podcasts I have listened to have awkward silences, people talking over each other, very fake laughter at each others jokes, in house gags, mispronounced product names, awkward silences and people talking over each other.
    Couple that with strong accents and droney voices and I just can’t manage to sit through some of them.
    Oh and bad music.
    I have turned some off as I felt awkward/embarrassed at listening to them.

    The ones I have found more enjoyable are ones where the podcaster is doing a piece to mic.
    Just them talking clearly and concisely.

    I am not saying I can do better, far from it.
    But it is difficult to do an interview without any interview skills, and I do feel it is a skill, and this must be made harder when you can’t see the other person.

    How do other people get on with hobby podcasts?

    #73656
    Whirlwind
    Whirlwind
    Participant

    I get on fine with them, in general.  I like the “chat with gamer mates down the pub” style, since I rarely get to do that IRL.  Is there lots of room for improvement – absolutely, sure.  But, like my painting, IMHO, done “okay” is usually good enough.  The ones I listen to:

    Meeples and Miniatures: https://meeples.wordpress.com/ and The View From The Veranda: https://meeples.wordpress.com/view-from-the-veranda/

    The Veteran Wargamer: https://soundcloud.com/user-989538417

    Wargaming Recon: http://wargamingforums.com/

    Wargames, Soldiers & Strategy: https://thehistorynetwork.org/category/podcasts/wargames-soldiers-strategy/

    And I used to listen to the “Small and Vicious Podcast” for WFRP too.

    I’d like it if there were more coverage of the “indy” end of wargaming – CoW/WD-stuff, Old Schoolers etc, 6mmSci-Fi

     

    Actually, if anyone could recommend some good podcasts I’d appreciate that: history, warfare, science, technology, philosophy etc.

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Whirlwind Whirlwind.
    #73665
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    I struggle to find any hobby podcasts that I enjoy. I had been pondering this for a while then it hit me. The majority of ones that I have tried have been discussion/interview style ones. I have found that they are too amateurish. I don’t mean that in a negative way as such, but an interview style media piece can be messy when not done by a media professional. The podcasts I have listened to have awkward silences, people talking over each other, very fake laughter at each others jokes, in house gags, mispronounced product names, awkward silences and people talking over each other. Couple that with strong accents and droney voices and I just can’t manage to sit through some of them. Oh and bad music. I have turned some off as I felt awkward/embarrassed at listening to them. The ones I have found more enjoyable are ones where the podcaster is doing a piece to mic. Just them talking clearly and concisely. I am not saying I can do better, far from it. But it is difficult to do an interview without any interview skills, and I do feel it is a skill, and this must be made harder when you can’t see the other person. How do other people get on with hobby podcasts?

    I agree entirely with all your points Mike. Henry Hyde usually makes a valiant effort at saving VftV. Mostly he succeeds. The Call of Cthulhu RPG podcast, The Good Friends of Jackson Elias is OKish, but a bit too matey at times in that the podcasters seem to be having a better time than their audience will.

    Otherwise there are very few (no) hobby podcasts I enjoy. Which is a pity, because I enjoy amateur/semi-pro podcasts in other subjects. If anyone knows of any rare gems, I’m all ears.

     

     

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #73676
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I listen to Meeples & Miniatures from time to time. I ultimately do appreciate it and consider myself part of its audience base, but it’s still not an ideal podcast for me. My reasons are a bit different from AB’s. Mainly, I find that many of the discussion topics manage somehow to skirt around everything that’s actually exciting about the hobby. For my personal tastes and preferences, they don’t talk nearly enough about the inspiration, the storytelling/worldbuilding aspects, the fantasy, the military history, or the joy of actual gaming and “hobbying” on a personal level. Instead, they tend to gravitate to discussing the humdrum factual and business/industry/”professional” dimensions of wargaming, like whether Kickstarters are a good business model or not (many times over, in different interviews), or what’s the inside scoop on recent changes to the editorial staff or ownership of this or that magazine, or what’s the interviewee’s professional history working for other game companies in the past before striking out on his own. It’s a bit… grey. It’s like going to an art museum and being shown an exhibition of paints, brushes, easels and smocks instead of actual paintings.

    I wish that, for instance, if they were to interview someone who’s released a range of figures for the Jacobite Uprising of 1745 (completely random hypothetical example, just because I needed to come up with something to illustrate a point), they would delve deeper into what they find inspirational about that conflict, what kind of unique adventures can be had with a Jacobite Uprising project, what are some good tips for anyone interested in but daunted by the thought of such a project, what to read/watch for inspiration and reference, what kind of terrain/scenery they think suitably atmospheric for the setting (and maybe even how to craft it), what their thoughts are on painting tartan, what are their respective favourite rulesets for capturing the style and feel of the conflict (and why), what memorable experiences the interviewee has had gaming the ’45, and so on. Whereas in reality, they would probably spend half of a 60-minute interview getting a factual account of the interviewee’s personal history, and the other half talking about the difficulties he had contracting a caster to manufacture the figures for him, or something else mundane like that.

    I feel like they’re not actually trying to have their discussions be so mundane, they just don’t know how to manage their time or steer the conversation in a more stimulating direction, so by the time they’re knackered and have clocked a full episode, they still haven’t progressed past talking about “the weather and the roads”.

    All this probably makes me sound very critical of Meeples & Miniatures, but to reiterate, I do still like it enough that I keep listening to it, sporadically at least. My criticism is constructive, or it would be if I was actually saying it to them instead of a forum they might or might not visit. I don’t expect I could do better, myself. If I was to try making my own podcast, it would probably turn out less than half as interesting, in an awkward Scandi accent, and peter out after the third or fourth episode. I don’t believe in the least that making a podcast is easy, far from it.

    As for other hobby podcasts, I have very little experience of them. I’ll join the chorus and state that I’ll gladly hear any recommendations for inspired, inspiring podcasts.

    #73707

    I find most of them incredibly boring to be honest mainly due to the host having no experience in interviews or media production.

    #73723
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Podcasts.

    Well the name puts me off for a start, regardless of content. A neologism from a journalist struggling with what to call a web based sound programme. A mash up of a branded piece of kit which is not required to listen, nor is the primary means of listening, to a programme that is most decidedly not broadcast (the other half of the mash).

    Putting that quibble aside, the problem generally is the same problem that public access radio had/has: it’s made by the public. Turning broadcast slots over to the public results in what you would expect; unprofessional, obsessional, minority interest shows. If you share that particular minority interest you may be prepared to set aside the quality issues, but that is no reason to inflict it on the rest of the public. On that basis the podcast should be the ideal place for such experiments in letting the public loose on entertainment, or infotainment, production.

    Generally the results will reflect the above problems, but this may not matter if only the self selected are victims.

    The problem for me I think is that I am a niche within a niche. I don’t want to listen to people mulling over what they want to say about a piece of plastic kit, group of metal soldiers or someone’s paint technique. I would rather they cut to the polished review that tells me the bottom line of their mental perambulations. I want a picture of the figures and a few well crafted comments about what they represent, could be used for, and relative value compared to cheaper/dearer rivals that may or may not be more accurate representations of the subject. If I want painting tips – video please, plus succinct commentary or written explanation.

    I don’t mind the gossip about the behind the scenes stuff. I would like more on rules mechanisms and why they work/don’t work for particular types of combat/scenario/history. And much more on non-figure based (or at least current trend 28mm figure based, face off and fight) games. I agree with Whirlwind on the more ‘Indy’ end of things.

    I would also echo Rhoderic’s comments regarding inspiration and possibly history – but again, as I spend most of my time arguing with the TV screen when ‘history’ programmes are aired, I suspect third hand whig history strained through a bit of populist revisionism might drive me to physical violence (at my age a comedic enterprise we can all do without.).

    I suppose I could try doing one myself, but as my interests are, as I say, somewhat of a niche market at best, I suspect I may simply prove the validity of the critical points above. But you never know – vanity may one day get the better of me!

    #73733
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    As all of the above comments are a bit…negative, who does listen to podcasts? 😉

    I wrote this rather damning critique of some parts of some podcasts yesterday as an addendum to my earlier post. Don’t shoot me.

    Some thoughts to ponder

    You, the podcasters, may have been mates for 42 years, shared each other’s joys and troubles and girlfriends, been best men at each other’s weddings, but we listeners don’t know you from Adam – leave out the in jokes eh? And the oblique references to that time in Basingstoke and the redhaired waitress, back in in 1976.

    Ever thought of using a script? Doesn’t have to be Gone With the Wind. Running order, timings, some discussion points? Run through it before you hit ‘record’.

    If you’re going to talk about history, at least have reference books at hand. And use them. It’s obvious if you’re making it up on the fly.

    I know retakes and edits are a ballache, but at least think about it, eh?

    Don’t try to ‘review’ something that only arrived at Dave’s on Thursday. Today’s Sunday. Not going to work is it?

    Which brings me to, the Horror..! The…Unboxing!!! “Hi guys, I got the Flames of Fury Team Zulu Eagles of Glory Across a Deadly Legions box set yesterday and I’m just about to open it for you”. And he does. Cellophane tears, box opens. “…and looking inside the box we have…er…the rulebook, no that’s a scenario book…er…ah…here’s the rulebook…it’s…er…a big ‘un <giggle>…a whole BAG!…of… of…er…dice. There are some…cards…and…er…” NO! STOP!! For the love of GODS!!! STOP!!!

    I could go on…and yes, I could have a go myself. I have no interest in doing so. A man’s gotta know his limitations.

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #73741
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    I take it that’s a ‘No’ to my pitch of our new podcast ‘Two old gits rummage through the bits box’ then?

    #73742
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #73744
    irishserb
    irishserb
    Participant

    I’m another in the negative camp.  I’ve tried a few and just haven’t found them interesting. Many of the issues shared above apply in my case, probably most importantly, the lack of creativity or new ideas shared in the them.  Mostly they have struck me in the same way as sports talk, lots of words, but not much really being said.

    #74065
    Phil Dutré
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    I listen to a number of podcasts mentioned, mostly during painting sessions. Sometimes I “zone out” and then I “zone in” again, much as if you’re listening to the radio.

    Specifically for M&M: I like listening to them, although not the whole episode. I skip forward to the interview most of the time, the first part can be a bit too long at times.

    #74154
    durecellrabbit
    durecellrabbit
    Participant

    I mostly stick to history podcasts but I have tried several hobby podcasts. The D6 Generation is the only one I’ve stuck with. The quiz at the start was quite discouraging when I started listening to them but grew on me. I like the broad range of the hobby they cover as it lets me know about boardgame .etc which I don’t usually pay attention to. I like that they try to stay polite even if they don’t like what they review so it doesn’t turn into a hate fest. Lastly I find listening to them talk about their hobby time encouraging as I paint and the length of their episodes also goes well with an evening of painting.

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