Home Forums Horse and Musket American Civil War Neil Thomas's American Civil War

This topic contains 12 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by MartinR MartinR 3 weeks, 1 day ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #74893
    Victoria Dickson
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    Today I played my first game using the ACW rules in Wargaming: An Introduction.  Whilst having a lot in common with most of his other rules these rules add some concepts I don’t think I’ve seen elsewhere in his work, and it gives the game it’s unique flavour.

    Firstly, infantry and cavalry are rated as either Elite, Average or Militia for morale purposes.  The clever thing is, you can play that you don’t know what they are till the first time they have to make a morale check.  The quality is determined by rolling on tables split by Union or Confederate, Infantry or Cavalry, and Early, Mid or Late war.

    The next change from his usual practice is what happens when you fail a morale check.  Usually this causes a base loss in his rules, here it only causes a retreat unless such a retreat would take the unit off the table, in which case it loses a base.

    And finally, units can try to rally to recover bases if they start the turn with no enemy in position to fire on them.  Higher quality units have more chance of rallying.

    The net effect of these rules makes for a game very different from his usual ones.

    http://crazywargames.blogspot.co.uk/2017/10/neil-thomass-american-civil-war.html

    #74903
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I’ve played games with hidden morale, and it’s ok but I like to know which troops are good or bad.

    #74911
    norm smith
    norm smith
    Participant

    That is a nice visual of battle. In his One Hour Rules, the sequence of play is move followed by shoot, but units that moved cannot shoot. When I introduced a retreat result to those rules as a house rule, the effect was that a retreat actually helped the target (unless they were on the edge of the table) as it allowed them to disengage and forced the enemy to ‘come on again’, during which time they would move and then not be able to fire (attack – there is no melee), while having to endure another round of enemy fire.

    Also, in those rules, if you attacked an enemy and removed them in the fire phase, you then had no opportunity to advance that turn as there is  not a move after combat option, so taking ground  in the same turn as disposing of the enemy cold not happen, which becomes critical in the last turn for most of his objectives in his scenarios.

    I wondered, do these same sort of issues happen in his earlier Introductory set?

    I had the book years ago and got rid of it (a stupid decision as it turns out), but still have his Napoleonic book.

    http://commanders.simdif.com

    #74920
    Victoria Dickson
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    I’ve played games with hidden morale, and it’s ok but I like to know which troops are good or bad.

    I would too if I was playing an opponent, as a solo player I like the uncertainty. 🙂

    #74921

    Graham Harrison
    Participant

    A good looking game.

    #74922
    Victoria Dickson
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    That is a nice visual of battle. In his One Hour Rules, the sequence of play is move followed by shoot, but units that moved cannot shoot. When I introduced a retreat result to those rules as a house rule, the effect was that a retreat actually helped the target (unless they were on the edge of the table) as it allowed them to disengage and forced the enemy to ‘come on again’, during which time they would move and then not be able to fire (attack – there is no melee), while having to endure another round of enemy fire. Also, in those rules, if you attacked an enemy and removed them in the fire phase, you then had no opportunity to advance that turn as there is not a move after combat option, so taking ground in the same turn as disposing of the enemy cold not happen, which becomes critical in the last turn for most of his objectives in his scenarios. I wondered, do these same sort of issues happen in his earlier Introductory set? I had the book years ago and got rid of it (a stupid decision as it turns out), but still have his Napoleonic book.

    You do get the same issue, yeah, though it depends how you look at it whether it’s a problem.

    I’ll probably explain this badly, but here goes.  X fires and causes a base loss on Y.  If Y passes it’s morale it stays in place and can fire back on it’s next turn.  If it fails it retreats and can not fire, now being out of range, so X advances and can not fire and then Y fires.  In both cases the sides are getting one shot each before the other shoots back, no one gets to shoot twice in a row.

    There’s the added possibility of a unit rallying if there is no enemy in range to fire on them, which complicates things a bit because the unit which retreated out of range may do this while it waits for the enemy to advance.  And the victor might choose to rally before moving forward again.

    The only way you get two shots in a row without reply is if you force the enemy back and they return to their position on their turn.

    I’d need to play more to form an opinion about advancing after combat, it’s hard enough to get anyone to move into melee let alone win one. 🙂

    #74986
    norm smith
    norm smith
    Participant

    Interesting, so the retreat distance is greater than weapon range. In the One Hour Rules it is the taking of ground that the rules seem to put a brake on.

    http://commanders.simdif.com

    #75004
    Victoria Dickson
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    I did say I’d probably explain it badly. 

    Musketry range is double the retreat distance (which is a full move), but it makes sense to open fire as soon as you move into range so a retreat normally takes the target back out of range as a result.  If you took another turn of movement to get closer before starting to fire that wouldn’t be the case, but you’d take an extra round of fire to get that close.  It would open up the possibility of a charge, but that seems like a poor choice compared to firing (I may change my opinion on that as I become more familiar with the rules, it does have the advantage of moving you forward while getting to fight in the same turn).

     

     

    #75009
    norm smith
    norm smith
    Participant

    That makes sense. Most of what I am reading is saying that the ACW was not about charging and then going hand to hand, but more about charging and one side gives way before the actual contact (generally). I think the Glory Hallelujah ACW Black Powder supplement has a command penalty when trying to order a charge.

    http://commanders.simdif.com

    #75011
    ian pillay
    ian pillay
    Participant

    Very nice looking game. I’ve yet to play these rules, I’ve played plenty of OHW with my small ACW forces. Gives a fun game. Looking forward to trying these once I get more lead painted.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Tally-Ho!

    #75031
    norm smith
    norm smith
    Participant

    Are they 3″ squares (guessing that the dice are 7mm and 10mm), the snake fencing looks superb.

    http://commanders.simdif.com

    #75035
    Victoria Dickson
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    One size bigger, 4″ squares and 12mm and 15mm dice. The figures are 15mm and I didn’t use the standard basing from the rules (3 infantry on a 40 x 20 base and 2 cavalry on a 40 x 40), I went for 4 infantry or 2 cavalry on 25mm squares.

     

     

    #75047
    MartinR
    MartinR
    Participant

    I don’t think the bases sizes matter too much as long as the unit footprints are sensible. We’ve played a few games of the NT ACW rules and they work well (as do the Napoleonic ones). A good compromise between the simplicity of his OHW rules and the more complex ones from Into to Wargaming are his Simplicity in Practice rules which work very well for the whole horse and musket/rifle period.

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.