Home Forums Sci Fi 6mm Sci-Fi Tools for removing figures from sprue.

This topic contains 11 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by willb willb 2 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #70151
    Thuseld
    Thuseld
    Participant

    Hi all, I am having an issue with some of my 6mm figures. They seem attached to the sprue with a really thick chunk of metal. My clippers leave a large chunk on the base, and my knives can chop it off, but I keep bending and weakening the legs of the soldiers. Anyone have any tips on removing ken from thick SPRUE?

    #70152
    Mike
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Sounds like mine or Brigades…

    I just hold the actual figure itself and use a knife…

     

    #70155

    greg954
    Participant

    Yeah that’s all I do. Hold and support the figure while my clippers do the work.

    #70162

    Ian Marsh
    Participant

    Flat-cut sprue cutters, e.g. http://shop.princeaugust.ie/ac-ppl5703-super-snipper/ I use them for work to get troublesome figures off mould sprues (i.e. when the gate has been cut badly) or for neatly clipping other people’s figures. I was so impressed I bought two pairs: one for the casting room, one for the hobby table.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Ian Marsh.
    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Ian Marsh.

    Ian
    Fighting 15s

    #70167
    Thuseld
    Thuseld
    Participant

    I will give the holding method a go before I buy a fancy new tool. Thanks all.

    #70171
    norm smith
    norm smith
    Participant

    I hold the base exactly on its side, so that the figure is not touching anything. I then work away that metal lump with a knife, taking of small layers at a time is less stressful on the base / figure than trying to cut off a metal chunk in one go.

    http://commanders.simdif.com

    #70173
    Grimheart
    Grimheart
    Participant

    I dont think there is just one answer for this.

    I have used small angled clippers, flat cut clippers, or just a sharp scalpel, all as suggested above.

    They all have their pros and cons although these days i mostly use a decent pair of angled clippers and then tidy up with a small flat file.

    If you are using normal cheap model knives i strongly suggest buying a metal scalpel with replaceable blades. It makes a massive difference although you do have to be more careful as they are very sharp! I got mine with a box of 100 blades on amazon.

     

    Interest include 6mm WW2, 6mm SciFi, 30mm Old West, DropFleet, Warlords Exterminate and others!

    #70177
    Splod
    Splod
    Participant

    Flat cut clippers for me, usually does the job!

    Sometimes it takes some gentle application with a blade to flatten them off, but after a few ‘slips’ I’ve started using my dremel with a sanding head fixed to the bench.

    #70181

    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I use model railroad track cutters:

    http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/xur/xur2175b.htm

    They work great and give a nice flush cut.  If the base is particularly wide or thick, they can also make multiple flush cuts, rather like shortened parallel snips.

    I do NOT recommend wire cutters though – they work like scissors and will not give you a flat cut.

    #70183

    Ian Marsh
    Participant

    If you are using normal cheap model knives i strongly suggest buying a metal scalpel with replaceable blades. It makes a massive difference although you do have to be more careful as they are very sharp! I got mine with a box of 100 blades on amazon.

    Excellent as scalpel blades are for light work, they may snap when used for heavy-duty cutting (as will craft knife blades), with the result that something very sharp and pointy may ping off in the general direction of the user’s face and eyes. Flat-cut snips are far safer for heavy-duty work.

    Ian
    Fighting 15s

    #70210
    Darkest Star Games
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    I’m with Ian and will second the flat cuts.  Had a pair and loved them (they went walkabout at a convention though and I need a new pair).  There have also been times when I’ve had to use a dremel with a cutting disk…

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #70516
    willb
    willb
    Participant

    I second the model railroad track cutters.  They are designed to leave a flat surface on the outer side of the cutters usually leave nothing sticking out from the bottom of the base

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