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The “Masculine Epic?” A site that equates the Sea People’s armed invasions with today’s mass migrations and claims might is right? The strong take what they want and the weak are slaves?

Not very political at all that site, is it, Rod?

What with all the good archeology sites out there, do we really have to be linking to amateur websites with a fascist political axe to grind?

Here are some better links:

10 Fascinating Theories Regarding The Ancient Sea Peoples

http://www.ancient.eu/Sea_Peoples/

Also, I found Cline’s book 1177 to be a dry, but good introduction to the period.
But here’s something really fascinating that’s only come to light recently and which might eventually cast light on the Sea People’s phenomenon. Well worth a read:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/slaughter-bridge-uncovering-colossal-bronze-age-battle

This shows that there were Bronze Age chiefdoms able to mobilize large, transeuropean armies in Northern Europe and that they were at war just before the Bronze Age Dark Age. Note the probable date of this immense battle: less than a hundred years before 1177, give or take fifty. Plus, one of the sides seems to have come up from Soithern Europe.

So what we are looking at here may be a northwards push by the so-called Sea Peoples, or a push by other peoples who had been pushed out by the Sea Peoples.

One could hypothesize an invasion of the Danube Valley by a technologically and socially sophisticated group of peoples around about 1200, pushing other groups north and east. Then, 100 years later, the descendants of the Danube invaders head south into the Mediterranean.

Whoever they were, they weren’t ignorant barbarians. They mastered sailing and watercraft in a relatively short period of time. And, IIRC, they were also the — or one of the — founders of mass iron working.

We get slapped around, but we have a good time!