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#58843
Mr. Average
Participant

So let me tell you, I earned this weekend.  So this afternoon, after sketching for a few hours, I turned to the miniatures table and began working on the rivals to the Uesugi in the Northern Prefectures: the Kanda Clan.

The Kandas are a reformist clan, and have enjoyed a long and very profitable trading relationship with the American mercantile City-States, as well as some contact with the Europeans, especially the Catholics, who are officially tolerated within Kanda-held territory.  The disaster at Neo-Edo in 3497 left them as one of the major claimants to the vacant Shogunate, but they attempted to compromise, particularly with the Restored Oda.  Their willingness to do this, and to engage in commerce with the Americans and the Europeans, has earned them the distrust of the Uesugi, and skirmishes in Akita and Aomori in the winter of 3505-6 led the Kandas to undertake a major rearmament program.

The Kandas are somewhat behind in weapons technology, as evidenced above – their battle tanks still rely on electromagnetic railguns developed in the 33rd century.  They’re also lacking in the industrial-scientific complex available to the Uesugi, so they are generally unable to produce advanced plasma, antimatter and particle weaponry and have to purchase it from other clans (or those American states who make them).  However, their relationship with the Americans has given them access to advanced artificial intelligence programming, which they have implemented far more broadly than any other successor clan, and they deploy weapons like drones, powered armor and combat rigs in far greater numbers than their opponents.  They also make far more extensive use of “genius” grade missile guidance, an edge that has attracted the Ronin Shigemori to their cause.

The colors were suggested by a friend of mine – I think it’s pretty effective, although I basically cribbed the pattern from the Earthlight Division in order to create a design contrast to the Uesugi.  I added some brown ink shadows in key locations to boost the contrast in the photo above – as you can see below, it was originally a little too bright.  Overall very effective though, I think, and with two notoriously difficult colors, too.  Just takes a lot of thin layers and a lot of patience.