Home Forums General Game Design Pre-measurement Reply To: Pre-measurement

#77420
Phil Dutré
Participant

A few thoughts:

“Pre-measurement” can mean many different things. E.g.:

  • allowing pre-measurement before you take the decision to charge or shoot or do something else (but otherwise not allowing pre-measurement when deciding how far to move …);
  • allowing pre-measurement to place yourself just outside charge range of the opponent. And if you allow that, do you allow a pre-measurement measuring 2 turns ahead? Or 3 turns ahead?

… two different instantions of pre-measurement, with different impact on how the game is being played.

As for the argument that it would be silly if you’re 1mm short: that goes for all sorts of distance measuring. If your shooting range is 15cm, but you measurement gives 15.1cm, is shooting allowed or not? BTW, this also applies to variable distances.

Claiming that professional officers are used to estimate distances, and so pre-measurement should be allowed, is a slippery-slope argument. After all, professional officers were also trained to make tactical decisions correctly, or to go into formation at the right time … Why put one type of skill with the player, but not other types of skills?

As I said before, it’s a decision on how you want to run the game. You can rationalize pre-measurement in any way you want, that doesn’t make the game more or less “realistic”. The only good argument is whether you like the gaming style that comes with allowing pre-measurement better compared to not allowing it.

Personally, I dislike pre-measurement. Not allowing it adds some uncertainty and tension to the game. And if you want to stay outside the 15cm shooting range of the opponent, well, you should not take risks and stop at 25cm 😉 And vice-versa, if you want to make sure you are within the 15cm shooting range, move up to 10cm.
And if we are in a situation where an action depends on a few millimeters, we simply roll a yes/no dice to decide whether the action is possible or not (we also handle ambiguous line-of-sight issues that way).

The only real problem is when you play a game and you like pre-measurement and your opponent does not. That’s a difficult situation to resolve 😉

  • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Phil Dutré.
  • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Phil Dutré.
  • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Phil Dutré.
  • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Phil Dutré.
  • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Phil Dutré.

Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/