Home Forums Horse and Musket Napoleonic AAR: 1813 French & Saxons vs Prussians & Russians

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  • #23832
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Hello,

    Here’s the setup of our latest Napoleonic game, French veterans supported by a Saxon division vs two Russian and one Prussian corps. The Allies are hitting the French immediately following a river crossing hoping to drive Eugene’s French Army back into the river.

    This was the first game in which I’ve gotten to use the new terrain mat I recently finished. It is a “caulk & flock” style mat, really happy with how it turned out. Drastically less time than I’d expected to make and dresses up the game substantially.

    Rules are ESR (Et sans résultat!)
    Figures are 15mm by OG15s (19th Century Miniatures)
    Ground scale for this game was 1″ = 75 yards

    I’ll followup with some turn-by-turn photos so you can see how it turned out.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    Prussian corps composing the Allied right flank.
    Prussian corps composing the Allied right flank.

    Allied left wing: two corps of Russians with supporting cavalry and a grand battery formed in their center.
    Allied left wing: two corps of Russians with supporting cavalry and a grand battery formed in their center.

    Viewing the battlelines from behind the Russian left on the southern flank.
    Viewing the battlelines from behind the Russian left on the southern flank.

    Opposing forces on the Allied left, French and Saxons infantry forming to oppose the deep Russian deployment.
    Opposing forces on the Allied left, French and Saxons infantry forming to oppose the deep Russian deployment.

    Rear of the French line, the main bridge over the river is visible in the upper left.
    Rear of the French line, the main bridge over the river is visible in the upper left.

    View of the developing French left wing opposed by the Prussians.
    View of the developing French left wing opposed by the Prussians.

    Rear of the French line showing the proximity of the crossing points to the battle line.
    Rear of the French line showing the proximity of the crossing points to the battle line.

    • This topic was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by BanditBandit. Reason: corrected image links
    #23878
    sheepmansheepman
    Participant

    The terrain looks really good Bandit, can you give us all a description to how you did it?
    Dave

    'The higher up the tree the monkey goes, the more of it's arse you can see'.
    To bosses everywhere!

    http://thenorthumbrianwargamer.blogspot.co.uk/

    #23879
    SparkerSparker
    Participant

    Beaut looking game there Bandit!

    http://sparkerswargames.blogspot.com.au/
    'Blessed are the peacekeepers, for they shall need to be well 'ard'
    Matthew 5:9

    #23885
    francois trebosc
    Participant

    Interestin, what is the scale for unit: brigades, regiment?

    #23890
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    The terrain looks really good Bandit, can you give us all a description to how you did it? Dave

    Thank you. The terrain mat is a “caulk in-pregnated flock mat”. My first time making one. They are drastically easier than you’d think. In short:

    1) Select some woven fabric such as muslin or inexpensive, loose, pliable canvas. On this one I used unbleached muslin, on my next I am using cheap canvas.

    2) Select a caulk in some shade of brown, I used acrylic on this one due to the low-to-no odor. On my next one I will use silicone due to cost and increased elasticity.

    3) Select a variety of flock, corse turf, ballast, and static grass. The mat above used about a dozen, maybe more, different colors.

    4) Select an area, say between 8-18″ x 8-18″ in size, spread caulk over it about as thinly as you can, practically scraping it from the material. I had no issues leaving enough caulk to bond with the flock.

    5) Generously dump flock/static grass/ballast/turf into the area completely covering it. Using your hands or a flat tool, such as a small sheet of cardboard, press down on the flock smashing it into the caulk.

    6) Shake off the excess, preferably into some sort of catch container so you can use it again, otherwise you’ll be throwing away a lot of flock.

    7) Repeat over and over until the mat is complete.

    Some tips:

    * The caulk can start to dry on you if you try to do too large an area at once and the result is less flock material will stick to it. Frankly this could be desired in some areas but you kinda want to know rather than be surprised when a bunch falls off.

    • Mix and match your varies flocks, creating mixes for various areas is good but also mixing on an area is good and gives you a less blended, more flowing look. Pour some of one down, then smash it and dump it, then pour another down, each time covering more but not all of the area.

    • Do your river first. I painted the rivers, then after they were dry went over them with clear caulk spreading it with my finger in a rubber glove, then once that was dry (took about overnight), sprayed them with a gloss finish. This is the only part of the mat I sealed because otherwise the flock and static grass would cling to my clear caulk and obscure it.

    • Do roads after rivers, make them a lot wider than you want. When you are caulking and flocking the areas that boarder the road the method I used was to come right up against and cover the edge of the road I’d created, it gives some illusion of a sunken roadbed and it makes the road look part of the terrain rather than something applied to it. But this does narrow your roadbed since you’ll naturally cover over some of it.

    • When dumping excess flock off, dump it via a route that has it travel over other areas you’ve done so that you get some random intermixing.

    I did this mat over the course of a week, spent maybe 1-4 hours a day on it as time allowed, whole thing took less than 15 hours I estimate. I plan to do my next one in a solid long session over a weekend and am hoping to complete it in a day.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #23891
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Beaut looking game there Bandit!

    Thanks Sparker, while you and I have rarely agreed about rules and games, but the stuff you put on always looks very sharp and nicely finished so I really appreciate the compliment. Thank you.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #23892
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Interestin, what is the scale for unit: brigades, regiment?

    ESR has one stand = one unit: battalion, squadron group, battery. Each large mass is generically called a division though in some cases they’d be brigades – common with cavalry as you can imagine. The divisions on the tabletop here are all small for the most part, some of the Russian ones are actually up-to-strength but the French ones are on the small side for 1813 as most French divisions had a lot of rag-tag battalions in them.

    This engagement has two Russian corps, one Prussian corps, two French corps and one French cavalry corps. None of the corps are very big, but again, it is spring of 1813 and during parts of that year nothing was large.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #23894
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Here’s the first two turns of the game:

    The French left wing rushes forward to deploy while the Saxon division attacks the Russian grand battery.
    The French left wing rushes forward to deploy while the Saxon division attacks the Russian grand battery.

    The Prussians waste no time advancing into the dense woods to assault.
    The Prussians waste no time advancing into the dense woods to assault.

    Opposing lines on the French left, there is about a half mile distance between the two forces.
    Opposing lines on the French left, there is about a half mile distance between the two forces.

    From the French center the Saxon division comes straight forward upon the Russian grand battery.
    From the French center the Saxon division comes straight forward upon the Russian grand battery.

    Russian uhlans and hussars opportunity charge the Saxons to breakup their attack. The grand battery explodes: two Saxon battalions are largely wiped out.
    Russian uhlans and hussars opportunity charge the Saxons to breakup their attack. The grand battery explodes: two Saxon battalions are largely wiped out.

    Overview of the battlefield after the turn one, looking from the Russian left rear across.
    Overview of the battlefield after the turn one, looking from the Russian left rear across.

    The Prussian corps makes slow progress through the woods as the French bide their time deploying a second division.
    The Prussian corps makes slow progress through the woods as the French bide their time deploying a second division.

    The Saxon division withdraws to its starting point outside range of the Russian batteries as the fight in the woods on the battery's flank intensifies.
    The Saxon division withdraws to its starting point outside range of the Russian batteries as the fight in the woods on the battery’s flank intensifies.

    The Prussians continue to close the gap advancing, French light cavalry charge the landwehr cavalry covering their infantry's flank, make some progress but are ejected and fallback.
    The Prussians continue to close the gap advancing, French light cavalry charge the landwehr cavalry covering their infantry’s flank, make some progress but are ejected and fallback.

    The fight over the woods flanking the Russian grand battery becomes desperate, the French are losing ground but the Russians are fatiguing faster.
    The fight over the woods flanking the Russian grand battery becomes desperate, the French are losing ground but the Russians are fatiguing faster.

    Overview of the battlefield after turn two, looking from behind the French left across.
    Overview of the battlefield after turn two, looking from behind the French left across.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #23902
    Marshal SinCereMarshal SinCere
    Participant

    The battlefield and the game looks great Bandit.

    One of the things I really like about ESR is that players get the opportunity to carry out a deployment, if they so wish. Its challenging and fun at the same time. It feels very Napoleonic…..and it looks very cool in the photos.

    #23904
    Anthony March
    Participant

    Bandit, that is a great looking game (and mat).  I like the fact that there is space on the table.  Too many games have figures crowded on the table without proper room for maneouvre.  I am something of a rules collector, but I am trying to be more disciplined with my purchases as most rules end up never being played.  I like what I can see, and can imagine how a game plays.  I would like to know more about the game mechanics, especially how the units behave.  Could you please explain how the battalions and divisions function in the game?

    Anyway, for now, well done.

    #23927
    francois trebosc
    Participant

    very nice AAR Bandit , thanks to share it with us.

     

    I didn’t know this rule sebfore, but I will have a look on it

     

    How bigger is your table?

     

    (sorry for my bad English, merci

    #23940
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    I would like to know more about the game mechanics, especially how the units behave.  Could you please explain how the battalions and divisions function in the game?

    Well, as a player, you’re a corps commander. First thing to note is that orders are persistent, you tell a division to do X and they continue to do X until they can’t or they successfully complete it or you tell them to do something else. This makes it a very “think multiple moves ahead game”.

    Battalions (and other tactical units) are mostly an observational concern. What I mean by that is that players don’t manage battalions but battalions still exist. You send a division forward and you care if its battalions are all busted up or routing, but you don’t care exactly how they contact the enemy or what their exact placement is as the tactical concerns generally have no impact on the combat resolution. Battalions win and lose combats as individual units so they still provide “personality” in that way and aren’t just one of several stands that make up a division.

    Statuses of stuff in the game nearly all follow a “play it as it lies” philosophy. Each division has a rear area, when a unit (battalion for instance) routs, it is placed in that rear area so there is no measuring for rout moves and no rout marker, you know that a battalion is routed by its placement. Divisional rear area (called a Reformation Area) can therefore be marked by a small diorama like a supply wagon or caisson. This general method got rid of all the tabletop markers but the order cards – which could be kept off-table if you so chose.

    You can get a lot more high level description of how things work on the website: http://www.thewargamingcompany.com/etsansresultat or ask away.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #23941
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    very nice AAR Bandit , thanks to share it with us.

    You are welcome.

    I didn’t know this rule sebfore, but I will have a look on it

    Please do, we’re quite proud of it and people seem to like it. We don’t have a reseller on the continent but Magister Militum and Caliver Books are carrying ESR in the UK. We’ll do international orders soon but due to shipping costs you are likely better to find it more locally.

    How bigger is your table?

    Typically we play on a 6′ wide by however long, I have a large basement so the length of the table varies up to ~20′. This was a smaller battle.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #23949
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Here are photos covering turns 3, 4 & 5. These were marked by horribly bad dice for the Allies and average to excellent dice rolls by the French. The Prussian assault against the woods on the French left should have crushed their opponents as they out-rated them across the board, secured their flanks, brought up artillery support, and had their cavalry positioned for followup upon their success.

    On the French right the battle continued to wage in the narrow wood and while the Russian fatigue was building, the French were slowly being knocked out of position. If the Russians could take that wood, they would be able to surge forward against the French flank with two fresh divisions of each infantry and cavalry.

    Unfortunately even the best plans (nor any ruleset) can save you when you can’t roll over a ‘5’ on 2D6 for an entire turn…

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    The Prussian lead division slams into the French left.
    The Prussian lead division slams into the French left.

    But the dice go badly and the Prussian grenadiers are tossed back despite out rating their opponents.
    But the dice go badly and the Prussian grenadiers are tossed back despite out rating their opponents.

    Having almost a third of their division thrown back due to horrible dice, the Prussian assault bounces.
    Having almost a third of their division thrown back due to horrible dice, the Prussian assault bounces.

    Bad dice are contagious, after 4 turns of fighting in the woods on the French right, the Russians break.
    Bad dice are contagious, after 4 turns of fighting in the woods on the French right, the Russians break.

    Having fled the battleline the broken division now huddles in the woods of the Russian rear.
    Having fled the battleline the broken division now huddles in the woods of the Russian rear.

    Watching their infantry support break and run, the Russian grand battery withdraws toward the rear.
    Watching their infantry support break and run, the Russian grand battery withdraws toward the rear.

    The battlefield at the end of turn 3, viewed from the extreme French right.
    The battlefield at the end of turn 3, viewed from the extreme French right.

    The battlefield at the start of turn 4, viewed from the Prussian right, new orders nearly everywhere.
    The battlefield at the start of turn 4, viewed from the Prussian right, new orders nearly everywhere.

    Turn 4 was quiet as everyone tried to revise their plans, but turn 5 exploded with French advances.
    Turn 4 was quiet as everyone tried to revise their plans, but turn 5 exploded with French advances.

    Shifting everything available to their right the French make a steady push.
    Shifting everything available to their right the French make a steady push.

    In a desperate move the Russians assault the advancing French right and center with their cavalry.
    In a desperate move the Russians assault the advancing French right and center with their cavalry.

    #23968
    willzwillz
    Participant

    Very nice looking and informative game, beautiful figures and terrain.  Thank you for sharing.

    #23992
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Great stuff Bandit, the game is a feast for the eye

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    #24030
    McLaddieMcLaddie
    Participant

    Very nice looking game, Bandit.  I agree with Anthony M.  Maneuvering space is what makes the game interesting rather than a edge to edge advance.  What scale were you using for the game, as I know ESR can be played with a number of scales.  That ‘half mile’ separating the French and Allies looked to be about six to eight inches–as a guesstimate.

     

     

    #24031
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Thanks McLaddie,

    I run our games at 1″ = 75 yards, though I have got some 6mm figures I might base up and do some higher ground scale matches with. The distance in that photo is just over a foot, maybe 13-14″.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    #24174
    BanditBandit
    Participant

    Here is the last portion of the photos from this game. Short synopsis is an unlikely French victory. The dice just dumped on the Allies, there were a couple turns where no one on the Allied side rolled above a six. Winning numerous unlikely tactical combats put the French in a position to press their breakout from the river. Worse yet was the unlucky timing of the bad Russian dice which resulted in three of their divisions effectively disengaging and providing the French both freedom to maneuver and opportunity to consolidate against a weak point. The game was played over 9 turns, took us about 3.5 hours to reach conclusion which represented 3 hours of time on the battlefield. Six commands are represented on the tabletop presuming that the army commanders run one of their corps. It was a nail biting game and really could have gone the other way.

    Cheers,

    The Bandit

    Overview of the battlefield from behind the French right as the Russian cavalry charge forward.
    Overview of the battlefield from behind the French right as the Russian cavalry charge forward.

    The Russian cavalry of the left flank were ejected without any level of success.
    The Russian cavalry of the left flank were ejected without any level of success.

    In the center the Russian horse was more successful, throwing back nearly the entire Saxon division.
    In the center the Russian horse was more successful, throwing back nearly the entire Saxon division.

    But the horsemen paid for it, fatigued and disorganized the division recalled.
    But the horsemen paid for it, fatigued and disorganized the division recalled.

    Lucky dice continue for the French and the Saxon battalions rally up.
    Lucky dice continue for the French and the Saxon battalions rally up.

    A fresh French division passes forward of the Saxons to hit the incoming Prussian assault.
    A fresh French division passes forward of the Saxons to hit the incoming Prussian assault.

    A desperate fight ensues as the Prussian grenadiers high portions of two French divisions.
    A desperate fight ensues as the Prussian grenadiers high portions of two French divisions.

    The Prussian grenadiers lose ground to the energized French defense and the offessive on the Allied right ceases.
    The Prussian grenadiers lose ground to the energized French defense and the offessive on the Allied right ceases.

    Moving back to the Allied left, the Russian cavalry, now supported by infantry collide with the advancing French.
    Moving back to the Allied left, the Russian cavalry, now supported by infantry collide with the advancing French.

    Despite the odds the dice fail the Russians, their cavalry disintigrates and their infantry gains no ground.
    Despite the odds the dice fail the Russians, their cavalry disintigrates and their infantry gains no ground.

    Overview from the center of the Russian line, their two fresh divisions begin a rear-guard to allow withdrawal.
    Overview from the center of the Russian line, their two fresh divisions begin a rear-guard to allow withdrawal.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by BanditBandit. Reason: corrected a typo in the image links
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