Home Forums Horse and Musket Napoleonic 2/87th The Prince of Wales Own Irish Regiment

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  • #13719
    carojon
    Participant

    Hi all,

    I’ve just completed the second Irish battalion that made its debut during the Talavera campaign.

    2/87th, JJ's Wargames

    Later, to be known as the “Aigle Catchers” amongst the British Army in the Peninsula, this battalion would develop from an unpromising start to achieve the accolade as the first British regiment to capture a French Eagle in the Peninsular War.

    If you would like to know more about this unit, then just follow the link to JJ’s.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/87th-foot-prince-of-wales-own-irish.html

    Jonathan

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    #13721
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Very nice sir, now I know that a pinch of salt is required…
    Are they the same chaps as in Sharpe the TV show?

    #13738
    Greystreak
    Participant

    Clearly not, Mike:  the fictitious “South Essex” Regiment of Sharpe fame had yellow collars and cuffs.

    Bryce Allen

    #13739
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Not the South Essex, but the ones that Belonged to the Prince of Wales and captured an Eagle.

    #13740
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    Not the South Essex, but the ones that Belonged to the Prince of Wales and captured an Eagle.

     

    Right – flexes Napoleonic know-how – here goes

     

    The 87th didn’t ‘belong’ to the Prince of Wales as such. They were raised in the late 18th century and titled The Prince of Wales Own Irish Regiment. The regiment captured the eagle of the 9eme Ligne at Barrosa in 1811, being the first British regiment in the peninsula to do so. They nicked a marshal’s (Jourdan’s)  baton at Vittoria too.

     

    After the PoW’s accession (as George IV) they became the 87th Royal Irish Fusiliers Regiment.

     

    Does that help?

    "I'm not signing that"

    #13741
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Does that help?

    No.
    I am still no clearer if they are the ones from Sharpe!

    😀

    Not that it matters, as it is distracting from the the pretty models.

    #13742
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Not Connard Sage wrote:</div>
    Does that help?

    No. I am still no clearer if they are the ones from Sharpe! :D Not that it matters, as it is distracting from the the pretty models.

     

    I think you can assume that as they had a similar regimental title in the TV series, and captured an eagle, then Cornwell (or a scriptwriter) probably had the real 87th in mind.

    And the unit that Carojon has painted are the 87th. He says so on his blog.

     

    "I'm not signing that"

    #13752
    willz
    Participant

    Very nice, cheers for sharing.

    #13753
    carojon
    Participant

    Cheers Guys thanks for your comments.

    Mike, I am not an expert on Bernard Cornwell and his Sharpe novels or the TV series, but I have read and seen them all. I know that BC draws heavily on the historical fact to create his fiction and “Not Connard Sage” is correct that the South Essex have Yellow facings in the TV show and indeed carry the Eagle and Wreath motif on their Colours, an obvious nod to the award  made to the 87th.

    My reference to Sharpe was to illustrate how true the common used phrase that “fact is often more interesting than fiction” is and as I am currently reading “The Battle of Barrosa 1811” by John Grehan and Martin Mace, I know there is a lot more stuff about this action that I left out. For example, in my post I mention that the 2/87th lost 4 officers and 50 men on emerging from the tree line before they advanced on the French. What I didn’t include was that the battalion officers were in a heated conversation with the Coldstream Guards as to who should lead out first when those casualties were suffered. Interestingly, the map from Oman shows the 87th to the right of the Guards in the line which was a breach of protocol as the senior battalion should always be on the right of the line. The fact was, that the re positioning of the British troops by Graham was so rapid that it led to units moving immediately towards the threat ignoring the usual formalities, which was obviously not how the Guards like things to be done! This might make an interesting little complication to throw at players in a game.

    Jonathan

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

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