Home Forums General Blogs 3mm Korean War Project

Tagged: ,

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #113535
    JozisTinManJozisTinMan
    Participant

    Finally got some painted, enjoy!

    https://jozistinman.blogspot.com/2019/04/korean-war-project-first-pics.html

    http://jozistinman.blogspot.com/

    #113536
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    Nicely done! And at my favorite scale, too!

    Just a touch of a yellow-green highlight to catch the very edges of the tanks might bring out the detail, but you’ve done very well as it is. They’re going to look great in masse!

    #113550
    Thaddeus BlanchetteThaddeus Blanchette
    Participant

    Another option, given that it is Korea and thus dry, is to use fine yellow flocking. That will really make them pop!

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #113561
    JozisTinManJozisTinMan
    Participant

    Thanks, guys!  I dry brushed them with a light grey, but I think I need a better camera. I may go back and hit them with some light yellow and maybe the flock as well.

    I am switching to some 28mm painting for a change of pace and then back to do another CVF Company and some bunkers and entrenchments.

    Also, bonus points to anyone that noticed the M-46’s are actually M-26’s, you can tell by the position of the M2 .50 cal on top.  How’s that for rivet counting in 3mm!

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 3 months ago by JozisTinManJozisTinMan.

    http://jozistinman.blogspot.com/

    #113565
    Thaddeus BlanchetteThaddeus Blanchette
    Participant

    The three best ways I know of making 3mm figs “pop” are this:

    1) Base counter to the paint scheme. As a corollary, base as light as you can, colorwise, to reflect as much light up into the miniatures as possible.

    2) Use very bright tones. Light blue instead of regular blue when painting French Napoleonic infantry, for example. For historical armor, don’t dry brush with grey or white, but with a lighter tone of the same color, preferably very color saturated. Another thing to do is hit the sharp edges with a bit of a neon tone of your main color, in this case, a bright green.

    3) Finally, for historical armor, exaggerate color markings. So for U.S. tanks, a bright blaze of white where the star would be, and for North Koreans a blaze of bright red. This will really help the models stand out.

    You need to paint much lighter at this scale for things to be seen at arm’s length.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.