Home Forums General General 6mm (and 3mm!) Without Pain

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  • #28885
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    Can someone bring the microscale gospel to New Guinea and explain to a benighted, top hat and bone-through-nose 28mm savage the virtues of these blobby ranks?

    #28890
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    Size.

     

    You can fight on one sixteenth of your normal playing area

    or

    You can have units which do not look like a colour party.

     

    At the moment I am doing the latter with my Liberators armies.  The units a re 72 strong and I can play on my dining table with open flanks and defence in depth.

     

    With 24 man Bns I could probably do Waterloo on a pingpong table.

     

    Poor painting is more easily forgiven.  Just do the block colours, belts, accoutrements, headgear and exaggerate unit disinctions.

     

    One thing it doesn’t giv you is 1:300 scale wargaming.  Adler based as close as possible take 3.75 feet per figure, about double reality.

    #28892

    Size, as was mentioned above. Either huge games on a regular table or regular games on a coffee table. The first option is spectacular in a way no other wargame scale is if you do your terrain correctly.

    Cost. Especially for moderns, sci-fi and WWII. Four USD buys you a company.

    Ease. Easy to paint, easy to collect and easy to transport and store.

    The ability to do one-off games or periods you’d normally not touch. Because of micro and picoscales, I am doing napoleonics relatively quick and painlessly. I wouldn’t be doing them in any other scale. It also allows one to do projects like, say, a Venezuelan invasion of Colombia, in a short time, with little cost and a small storage footprint.

    3mm is actually a bonus scale: it is so cheap and convenient that you can get into it without really compromising your other projects.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28904
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I think that covers most of the bases. Cost ($20-50 buys a very sizable force at 3mm scale, or a large skirmish force at 6mm scale), space (you can set up a worthwhile battle anywhere), low barrier to entry (I literally painted two Dirtside-II size forces in an afternoon), and quality (between fine detail castings from the likes of O8 and ultra-detail 3d printing from NCE, there is no sacrifice of detail or design).

    But I mean, game at the scale you like. You can give 3mm scale a try for next to no commitment in time or money- $30 and an afternoon of painting.  But like anything, if you go into it expecting to be disappointed, you’ll find a way to make that happen I’m sure. I think you’ll find that the only reason 3/6mm scale folks proselytize as we do is that we like our “blobby ranks,” and want people to try them out before making judgments about them, which is usually not the case.

    Last Sunday you saw my AAR for a 6mm skirmish, so you can see how that goes down. Hopefully, this weekend I’ll be able to post a 3mm scale Dirtside AAR to give you an idea of that scale too, and how it can work. Just give it a try if you’re interested, is my suggestion.

    #28908
    Sparker
    Participant

    In the context of armour gaming, I’ve actually found the barrier to 6mil is not actually painting the figures, even infantry, its the terrain. So ideal for large games set, say, on the Russian steppes or the Sinai desert. NW Europe, not so much…

    Horse and musket though, why not go the whole hog and used counters or wooden blocks, or Sam Mustafa’s lovely unit cards he’s produced for Blucher? No, for me, wargaming, as opposed to boardgaming, is about going as large as you can…(Says the guy living in Oz with acres of space….)

    http://sparkerswargames.blogspot.com.au/
    'Blessed are the peacekeepers, for they shall need to be well 'ard'
    Matthew 5:9

    #28909
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    I think the thing about 6mm terrain is to have lots of it.

     

    I can cover my dining table with a Norman Church and three fields in 25mm.  In 6mm, you need 10 or 20 feet of hedgerow, several villages, half a dozen woods ……  Topography is a bit of a challenge too.  I use books under a green blanket, but I intend to get some of those jigsaw foam rubber tiles that people use for kids bedroom floors.  These I will carve up to give tesselatable sculpted terrain under my blanket.  Terrain already takes up more space than toy soldiers and this will only get worse with time.

    #28911

    why not go the whole hog and used counters or wooden blocks, or Sam Mustafa’s lovely unit cards he’s produced for Blucher?

    Sam’s cards are far too big for those of us strapped for space. As to why not use counters or wooden blocks, I answered this years ago: http://leadnobleed.blogspot.com.br/search?q=Rice

    I am sure you can see the difference. It is quite significant.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28912

    I think the thing about 6mm terrain is to have lots of it.

    I can cover my dining table with a Norman Church and three fields in 25mm. In 6mm, you need 10 or 20 feet of hedgerow, several villages, half a dozen woods …… Topography is a bit of a challenge too. I use books under a green blanket, but I intend to get some of those jigsaw foam rubber tiles that people use for kids bedroom floors. These I will carve up to give tesselatable sculpted terrain under my blanket. Terrain already takes up more space than toy soldiers and this will only get worse with time.

    Terrain does take up more space, but that is relative. My entire three mm terrain collection takes up four 30x30x10 cm boxes. By comparison, my 15mm DBA armies are stored in SIX of the same sized boxes… And back when I gamed with them, I had a huge box of terrain, maybe 50cm x 50cm x 50cm. And that included only a few buildings.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28913
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    Likwise, the game table’s entirety can be much smaller, as well, which is kind of the point for me, such that the amount of terrain relative to the size of the board remains equal.  Instead of gaming at 48 by 60 inches, I just game at 48 by 60 centimeters, and the whole thing goes off with the same, or less, effort. In my skirmish last week, I simply condensed the scale from imperial to metric, and the relative size of my board was more than doubled.

    As to “why not just use counters,” in addition to TB’s clean exposition on the matter on his blog, I hasten to add that that’s exactly the kind of snarky “You’re not doing it right unless you’re doing it my way” kind of remark that makes me sound defensive when I talk about the scale.  I could just as easily say “If you think wargaming means you have to go bigger, why not just put on a uniform and become a reenactor?”  Clearly the remark is just as silly to you as it is to me.  As I said, play whatever suits you – I game happily at all scales, depending on time, place, and mood (including, since I brought it up myself, a day as a reenactor in a Civil War battle – strange friends I had in college)!  Just don’t knock something that just happens not to be your preference.  There’s a lot of different and equally valid ways to play, and this is just another one of them.

    #28915
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    It seems to me that beneath a certain size the abstraction inherent in the game comes overwhelmingly to the fore. Comparisons to tokens or SM’s unit cards dont seem to me as radically out of line, more like following the argument of design to its practical nadir. As someone who can see its application to the gargantuan artillery of the first world war, and it’s obvious utility in naval warfare sims, I’m not on automatic snark about microscales. It’s more that, as someone as much a modeler as a gamer, the detail that’s the big draw in, say, the FIW or WSS is reduced to a blur.

    #28922
    Norm S
    Participant

    Definitely horses for courses and as always beauty is in the eye of the beholder. For example I use hexes, plenty of people do not like them from an aesthetic point of view, but for me as a long time boardgamer they become largely invisible and I just enjoy their function which becomes second nature.

    My chosen scale is 10mm, though I do yearn for the individual aesthetic of the larger scale (20mm / 28mm). The practicalities are that my gaming area and storage space is limited, so 10mm it is – plus I do like that bird’s eye strategic view that you get from having lots of formations on the table with clumps of buildings looking more like villages and sections of town and being able to have more than one of them on the table at the same time with their strategically significant cross-roads etc becoming significant to play.

    I recently saw a Borodino (1812) game at a wargame show on a 4′ x 4′ table. It was inspiring and really looked the part. This would not have been possible with 28mm, certainly in the same space and even if you grow the table proportionally, I think the ‘army’ feel would be lost simply because the beauty of the individual 28mm figure (even in their blocks) is so apparent, while the mass of smaller, more anonymous figures, does give the impression of an army.

    I also want to collect and game in several periods, something that further pushes me down the smaller scale road – especially for storage purpose.

    Where the small scales can fail for me is when there are too few of them on the table and the visual starts to look a bit ‘weedy’ and sparse. In that regard the smaller game is not always as vastly cheaper or easier to paint as often suggested, because I need more of them for the effect that I want. Having said that, I have also seen 28mm too thinly spread on a base and losing some impact because of that – though no doubt admired by the owners, so does it matter really as long as the gamers own needs are met.

    My painting style is  not brilliant. I think for 3mm and 6mm you need to use light colours and have couple of points of real contrast to make the figures pop and more easily identifiable. Despite knowing this, I consistently fail to do that, so 10mm is better for me.

    I had one dabble with 3mm, painting up several units of Austrian napoleonic. I placed them in a line and photographed them. When I zoomed in, I saw that one base was facing the wrong way and that alone was enough for me to know that I needed something bigger for my older eyes.

    Overall I don’t see too many snarky comments about scale and in any case, they can be made at any of the scales. Even my 10mm have been described as being the best of 6mm and 15mm and the worst of 6mm and 15mm – the two statements cannot truly co-exist as statements of fact, so we are back to beauty being in the eye of the beholder and some acknowledgement that there is not a ‘one true way’ to do things.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 2 months ago by Norm S.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 2 months ago by Norm S.
    #28926
    Piyan Glupak
    Participant

    My feeling about 6mm figures is that you don’t necessarily use less space, but you get a lot more figures in the same space.

    For Napoleonics, I have taken to DBN.  I use 60mm wide by 30mm deep bases (I use deeper bases for artillery to help me avoid moves directly behind the guns.)  On the same bases, I could have about 4 figures in 25mm for most infantry.  I prefer the look of 24 men in 2 ranks.

    With ancients, I use the same sized bases that 15mm figures use; 40mm wide and various depths depending upon troop type.  I use 4 times as many figures as a 15mm army would use; for instance, hoplites would have 16 figures in 2 ranks.  (With chariots, elephants and artillery I usually just go for double the number of models per base.)  With 40mm wide bases, I prefer using 6mm for games with, for instance, 36 bases per side, whereas for 12 bases a side I tend to use 15mm.

    With 6mm, you can do things in basing that you can’t usually do with bigger figures, for instance show Mid-Republican Roman pila armed legionaries in manipules of hastati and princepes.  You can show mounted troops that charge in wedge-shaped formations, if you choose.

    Seleucid v Polybian Romans 6mm

    One aspect is that because the figure to man ratio is usually a bit more generous, it can be a bit easier to do convincing terrain.

    However, wargaming is a hobby, and the figure size that you use is a matter of personal choice.  If I had been a more talented painter, then I may well have focused upon 25/28mm.  I find 6mm easy to paint compared with 15mm, and very much easier than 25/28mm.

    #28928
    Mike
    Keymaster

    No, for me, wargaming, as opposed to boardgaming, is about going as large as you can…

    You play 54mm then?

    #28935
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    I’ve never understood the need some people have to swipe at other people’s choice of figure size.

     

    I have 28mm ‘armies’. And 25mm ‘armies’. And 15mm ‘armies’. And 6mm armies.

    Note the lack of inverted commas around the last armies…

    I played moderns and WWII with 6mm 30 years ago. Still got all the figures and vehicles. Now I’ve got a few DBN armies in 6mm – I use the larger base sizes and fill them with Baccus figures. On the table, even with only a dozen or so bases a side, the result looks more like a Napoleonic battle than a skirmish. And the footprint of the buildings, while still wildly out, isn’t as obvious as in larger scales.

     

     

    "I'm not signing that"

    #28936
    Angel Barracks
    Moderator

    Aaaah 6mm.
    I play 6mm for many reasons.
    Here is a ramble…
    They can be cheaper than the larger scales.
    I say can, but it seems to me that if you have a £200.00 budget you will spend the full £200.00 even if in 6mm that means buying more than you actually need.
    So whilst they may cost less per figure any savings are often negated by you buying more than you need because it is cheaper per figure.

    Space, again same as above applies.
    If you have space for an 8’ x 4’ table the chances are you will use it even if with 6mm the game could very easily be played on 5’ x 3’.

    Detail.
    Aaaaaah many people say 6mm has no detail.
    I say cobblers to this.
    Much of 6mm is massed ranks.
    Much of 6mm is hundreds of figures.
    Much of the 6mm seen online is badly* painted masses of figures.
    I totally understand why many people think 6mm has no detail when they see a mass of men spray painted black and then have three basic colours drybrushed over them.
    Now, for some this is fine, and good on them.
    But it does not do justice to the quality of some 6mm.

    I have a topic here that shows off some various 6mm from my sci-fi collection:

    http://www.thewargameswebsite.com/forums/topic/my-6mm-sci-fi-thread/

    Here you can see some 6mm historical buildings:

    http://www.thewargameswebsite.com/forums/topic/6mm-spanish-hill-town/

    And here is a 6mm cavalry, please note the painted buttons on the sides of his trousers.

    6mm models do have a good level of detail.
    Now if people are not able to do them justice because they do not have the skill/eyesight/patience/whatever, that is not a failing of the model; any more than it is a failing of Mercedes that I can’t afford a nice new S class.

    I play 6mm sci-fi skirmish with individually based models.
    The detail is good enough that each model has character.
    The cost is low.
    The space needed is small; I use a 3’ x 2’ board.
    Terrain is more impressive when viewed in relation to the model.
    By that I mean you can have very tall structures, sprawling urban areas, rivers that are actually wide enough to be a rivers rather than streams, trees that are tall like tress.
    I am often distracted by the latest shiny thing, and in 6mm it takes only a little time and expense to buy and paint that latest fad.
    If I see a cool film and want a force based on that film, the chances are that for £20.00 and one weeks’ worth of painting I have that new shiny force ready to go.
    Portability, if you go to clubs, or a mates house to game then 6mm is surely much easier to take than bigger scales.
    It takes up less space at home.
    The postage is normally cheaper as it weighs less.
    It uses less paint/superglue/flock etc.
    On a bigger table you can have room to outflank and be able to use movement rates that feel right and have fast troops really take advantage of that, all the time whilst having lots of big units on the table.

    Anyway, that is enough waffle.

    Size Matters!

    *IMO

    #28942

    It seems to me that beneath a certain size the abstraction inherent in the game comes overwhelmingly to the fore. Comparisons to tokens or SM’s unit cards dont seem to me as radically out of line, more like following the argument of design to its practical nadir. As someone who can see its application to the gargantuan artillery of the first world war, and it’s obvious utility in naval warfare sims, I’m not on automatic snark about microscales. It’s more that, as someone as much a modeler as a gamer, the detail that’s the big draw in, say, the FIW or WSS is reduced to a blur.

    So units which look more realistic in terms of their relation to the terrain appear to be more abstract to you? “Too abstract” is actually my argument regarding 28mm and even 15mm. It is hard for me to suspend my disbelief, in a WWII game, when my opponent’s line of tanks looks like the Bovington Museum. Four soldiers on a 40x15mm base just don’t seem like a Roman cohort to me.

    Because of the man-size to scenery-size ratio, one needs to perhaps pay more attention, in micro and pico scales, to the terrain. I say “perhaps” because nothing kills any wargame quicker than crap scenery.

    I think what really makes the game look “abstract” or not is the terrain: highly detailed and well painted miniatures played on an obvious bed-sheet with square, book hills is going to look bad no matter what scale you do. Meanwhile, I dare anyone to say that Bruce Weigle’s 6mm set-up looks too “abstract”…

    http://www.g-design.us/bruce/

    Now, mind you, you can make stylized and simple terrain that looks nice, as many Old School gamers demonstrate. And this can be done in any scale. The result is a nice-looking game of obvious toy soldiers, however, not an abstraction. I am currently messing around with an 18th century set up that attempts to do exactly this. It can be carried in a briefcase.

    Mr. Average makes a very important point: terrain isn’t a problem if you just scale everything down. And if you do that well, playing in 3mm has the same relation to playing in 28mm as watching a film on your iPad does to watching one in a cinema.

    Is the iPad a less spectacular option? Undoubtedly. But because of the way the human eye scales things, it can suck you in just as easily as the big screen, provided the film is any good. And the iPad can be taken with you pretty much everywhere, it costs one fifth the price of a home theater and can be stored in the space of a book.

    AB also makes a great point: who are we kidding? We’ll use the space we have and spend the money available, no matter what scale we game in.

    Very, very true.

    But the space I have at home is, maximally, 5×3 feet — half that if I want to keep a game up overnight. And whereas 200 USD is enough to buy me maybe 15 28mm Black Powder regiments, if I buy very cheaply and make small units, the same quantity of cash will get me more than 50 3mm units. Hell, I can get fifteen artillery batteries for 8 USD! The equivalent in 28mm would cost me 140 bucks!

    The upshot of this is that I started collecting Napoleonics three years ago on that 200 USD a year budget and I now have enough figures to play Leipzig, 1813, at 2000 men per unit. That game would need an 8×5 table, for sure, but I can do it! And, in the meantime, I can play corps-sized actions on my coffee table, with room left over for drinks and popcorn.

    As a result, I have now transitioned my 3mm collection to Sam Mustafa’s Blucher rules while I am starting a new 6mm collection for Black Powder. When that is done, maybe I will graduate to 10mm for Sharp Practice.

    But there is a final consideration regarding pico and micro scales: shipping.

    As many people on Frothers never tire of pointing out, I live in Brazil. Playing in 3mm or 6mm scale means I can recruit people to bring figures down for me very easily: the package is the size of a paperback novel, after all. Likewise, when I go overseas, I can fit entire armies in my luggage in the space taken up by one Perry Bros box. Finally, when I DO have to pay for shipping, the price is merely outrageous rather than nuke-the-household-budget crippling.

    Would I LIKE to play in 28mm on a 12×6 table in a dedicated wargames room? Sure. Just like I’d like to have a home cinema in my apartment. But I will be watching Netflix tonight on this iPad.

    As a coda, I have a good friend in São Paulo who plays and collects Warhammer 40k and who also lives in an apartment. A lifetime of collecting has given him enough troops to field substantial armies, but as for playing with them… He has had to start his own club just to get enough space. And when it comes to storing the figures, well, his wife’s a saint. Let’s just say that every piece of furniture in Silvio’s house has big plastic storage tubs full of terrain, Orks and Marines shoved under it.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28944

    So yeah, bigger is “better”, just like a Mercedes SL is “better” than a Volkswagen Beetle, as AB points out. I mean, I would rather have the Mercedes, right?

    But to extend AB’s metaphor, not only am I on a Volkswagen budget, I live in a place where a Mercedes SL would instantly get jacked were it to be parked on the street — and I have nowhere else to park it.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28946
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    I’d prefer a DB9 if anyone’s offering.

    "I'm not signing that"

    #28948

    Tough shit, Conrad: it’s the Mercedes or a ’67 VW Bug. Take it or leave it.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28949
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    Tough shit, Conrad: it’s the Mercedes or a ’67 VW Bug. Take it or leave it.

     

    I’ve owned a 69 Beetle, and I don’t like Mercs. It’s the DB9 or nothing Mac.

    It’s ‘Connard’ BTW. Est-ce que tu parles Francais?

     

    "I'm not signing that"

    #28962
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    It’s actually Saggy Conrad and I’m sure his Portugese is as bad as your French.

     

    Look, if I was a keen and great modeller, I would wargame with Historex figures, particularly if I could afford a basketball court and knee replacements.  However, to fit the battle of Maipu on my table, I need a scale of 1:1600.  A 90mm Bn frontage gives me 6 25mm, 4 newfangled 28-3Xmm, or 72 X 6mm.  For me that is no decision.

     

    If I wanted to do Leipzig, I would probably be looking at half to a third of the scale, which means 2 or 3 figs to a base at 25mm or about 24 in 6mm.

     

    Or I could use a set of rules in which scale doesn’t matter.  Now, I am interested in the military problems so a set of rules which resemble ludo with toy soldiers doesn’t appeal to me.  Even if I got super rich I would prefer to do real battles with my 72 fig units than create a 28mm traffic jam on a scale football pitch.

     

    Over the years there have been a set of soul searching introspective posts on the Place that I do Not Name on how to get more manouvre in your game.  The only convincing answer is 6mm.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 2 months ago by grizzlymc.
    #28964
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    Mac, proportion to terrain is important, yes. But it’s never realized. Even in your very optimal examples the 6mm Prussian infantry are scowling into the second story windows of the houses. It’s not unnatractive, just sacrificing detail for mass effect (which, given room, can be realized at bigger, more lavish scales). I can’t argue with the portability and economy but, towards Grizzly’s comment on the poverty of maneuver, a trip to Home Depot and a few bucks can net you all the pine board terrain you’d wish, just set them up in sequence.

    @AB: I checked out H&R, Rapier and a few other manufacturers and while I was surprised by the amount of available detail (sometimes equal to the more deformed among the 15mm ranges though well below, say, Xyston) I think the blur affect would obscure all but the most genius efforts. In an effort to be fair, and to see if I can pull off a solid paint job at that scale, I’m going to pick some up and see how it goes.

    #28969

    Yeah, but having 6mm figs look into second story windows actually LOOKS better than straight up scaled terrain.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28976
    Angel Barracks
    Moderator

    Even in your very optimal examples the 6mm Prussian infantry are scowling into the second story windows of the houses

    ah well that depends on the company that made the buildings.
    Total Battle Miniatures and myself exaggerate their buildings and make them out of scale to make them look ‘right’, that is to say they don’t make them true 1/300th, but make them so that they look right next to a 6mm figure.
    This is mostly done by making them taller than they would be were they to scale, say 1/300th.
    I take the figures base into account when I make my buildings.

    I also take into account that whilst a 6′ tall man can be represented with a 6mm tall figure, the same 1.5′ wide man will often be a 3mm wide figure, in effect 3′ wide.
    To make a 6mm figure the correct scale width would mean making figures that are too thin to cast.
    The same can be said about the limbs of 15mm sized figures and above.
    Hence having a true scale 6mm vehicle at 4mm wide for a car say, looks much too narrow when placed next to an overly wide 6mm figure.
    The same vehicle also looks too short if you base the figures and not the vehicle.
    I make my vehicles wider as a result.
    I also base them.

    I love the 6mm and I have no reason to go bigger, even were money irrelevant I suspect I would stick with 6mm, and just have bigger more impressive tabletops with whole city sections and huge tower blocks, deep chasms, proper hills and wide rivers etc.

    #28980
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    Does anyone make Russian Civil War armored trains in 6/3mm?

    #28982
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Not sure how close this would be to what you need?

    Irregular Miniatures Limited

    #28987

    WWII by O8, but it can certainly do…

    http://picoarmor.com/pico-products-detail.cfm?id=208&pid=1814&p=Trains&n=Smialy%20and%20Danuta%20(18%20pieces%20total)&m=0

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #28991
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    Yes it will. I think my first foray into microtopia will be an alt war during a variant American Depression between the iron fist of the Wichita Blood of the Lamb Apostolic Republic and the El Dorado Soviet.

    #28995
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I like where your head is on the background.  Alternate-history ho!

    #29003

    Yeah! See? This is where 3mm shines: weird and whacky one-off projects.

    My first venture into 3mm was a USA/CSA rematch in 1984, with the North using German kit and the South using British kit.

    Last year, I took a look at SJG’s prices for Ogre miniatures and when I stopped hyperventilating, I decided to do Ogre in 3mm.

    50 bucks gets you all you need, in any case.

    It is a bonus scale. You can make all sorts of fun games out of it, at the cost of one Warhammer regiment.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #29005
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    I’d look into QRF but for mysterious reasons known only to 6mm brains he’s put me on ignore and I suspect he’d return my checks covered in rabidly scrawled lipstick NO! NO! NO’S!

    #29006
    Mike
    Keymaster

    I’d look into QRF but for mysterious reasons known only to 6mm brains he’s put me on ignore and I suspect he’d return my checks covered in rabidly scrawled lipstick NO! NO! NO’S!

    Why do you think he has on you ignore?
    Also, please don’t make personal attacks.

    #29007
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    No idea Mike. At all. I could understand other people (many, many other people) but I didn’t even know he existed.

    #29008
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Let me re-phrase that.
    What makes you think he has you on ignore?

    #29009
    Lagartija Mike
    Spectator

    Because a few days ago I glanced at my profile and his icon was there in a grey box marked “ignore”. I x’d it out. It’s not important, just….odd.

    Update: I’m grossly techtarded and managed to accidentally block QRF, not the other way around. My apologies.

    #29031
    MartinR
    Participant

    As noted above, 6mm and 2/3mm are good for side projects which are a bit unusual or where you don’t want to allocate lots of storage space to them. I alos use them for lots of mainstream things too for the usual reasons – looks, cost, storage space, ease of transportation etc. Whilst you _can_ play gigantic 6mm games, I prefer to use them on smaller playing areas.

    I deliberately used 2mm for WSS as I really, really couldn’t be bothered trying to paint what passed for ‘uniforms’ in that period, and I have now discovered that with the addition of some pike blocks I can easily extend them backwards to the Thirty Years War and earlier.

    My Cold War WW3 stuff is also all 2mm as I really can’t bothered to buy and paint seen different variants of T64. A generic T64/72/80 is fine by me. I do have some 6mm (AiW) and 15mm (Africa, Falklands etc) in this period though.

    Napoleonics, APW, Italian Wars of Independance, FPW and WW1 Mespot/Palestine/East Africa are all 6mm too.

    Cheers

    Martin

     

     

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #29480
    GeoffQRF
    Participant

    Phew, that’s a relief. I never block anyone 😀

    QRF Models Limited
    www.quickreactionforce.co.uk

    #29524
    Sparker
    Participant

    I just wanted to say that where my comments about ‘may as well use unit cards or counters’ have been linked to snarkiness, there was none intended, but I can see how it sounded that way. Sorry!

    As I said in my post, I do actually use 6mil in situations of low terrain requirements such as the Russian steppes or Desert, and where, for me, the era is not about the glories of the uniforms and regimental variations, such as modern or WW2 – and very nice it is to get that sweeping field of action.

    And no, I don’t wargame in 54mm, but if I had longer arms, or younger knees, I would probably consider it!

    http://sparkerswargames.blogspot.com.au/
    'Blessed are the peacekeepers, for they shall need to be well 'ard'
    Matthew 5:9

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