Home Forums Renaissance A clash of horsemen in Ireland

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  OB 3 days, 20 hours ago.

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  • #124013

    OB
    Participant

    Irish Wars

     

    I had a look at cavalry fights in the Nine Years War and found two where we know what the individuals concerned did.  I hope you find both incidents as interesting as I did.

    https://youdonotknowthenorth.blogspot.com

    OB
    http://withob.blogspot.co.uk/

    #124126
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Yes, very.

    Call me a wimp if you will (everyone else does) but whilst I appreciate getting close enough to make sure the shot hits your enemy, being close enough to let him hit you in the head with his spear in return seems a tad too close for comfort – especially considering the result for St Leger.

    Leaders earned their status back then I guess.

    #124129

    OB
    Participant

    My very thought Guy.  It would seem that cavalry fighting got a lot more deadly.  For the Irish they had to get close enough to risk a deadly wound to have any hope of killing their enemy.  For the English they had to let their enemy get close to kill them before firing.  I’d imagine a lot of fellows found it expedient to shoot or throw a dart or two at a safe(ish) distance.  Leaders couldn’t do that.  It does make you think.

    OB
    http://withob.blogspot.co.uk/

    #124263

    Brendan Morrissey
    Participant

    “..darts, which they cast with a wonderful facility and nearness, a weapon more noisome to the enemy, especially horsemen, than it is deadly”

    I wonder if the feathers on the darts (see your illustration on your previous thread) is being referred to here, as fletched weapons would usually produce a noise (eg the English medieval “arrow-storm”)?

    #124272

    OB
    Participant

    It could be but ‘noisome’ means annoying rather than noisy in the context of the quote.  The view is that darts would produce non lethal wounds rather than deadly ones.  Mind you Captain Fuller would disagree he was killed by one at the Battle of the Ford of Biscuits.

    OB
    http://withob.blogspot.co.uk/

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