Home Forums Ancients A light and a heavy one ?

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #92451
    Paskal
    Spectator

    Hello everyone

    At one time – for example at the time of the Punic Wars – legionaries carried 2 types of pilums, a light one and a heavy one, which were very different.

    And at the time of Julius Caesar? The legionaries wore 2 types of pilums, a light and a heavy one?

    #92457
    Howard Whitehouse
    Participant

    That’s supposed to be true, but the practicalities of carrying pila into battle need to be taken into account. The Roman shield grip was horizontal, like a door handle, making it almost impossible to carry a spare pilum (or anything long) in the left hand. Both pila, then, would have to be carried in the right hand, putting one down to throw the other – awkward when advancing. Some have suggested that, in action, only one would be used.

    I do all my own stunts.

    #92465
    Paskal
    Spectator

    The horizontal handle of the Roman scutum, it is true that it had to be the galley to handle …

    But according to Peter Connolly, in his books, it seems that there was a way to hold the heavy pilum in the left hand with the scutum while we were throwing the light pilum.

    So they actually had two pila ?

    But by the way, at the time of Julius Caesar, the scutum handles were always horizontal ?

    Because the oman scutumof the first century BC were different from those of the second century BC …

     

     

    #92472
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    According to Barker, who is never one for underplaying the Roman army, from the Marian reforms until those of Augustus legionaries carried only a heavy throwing weapon – a pilum. No javelin.

    I’m sure that if St. Phil could have found any reference to them being double-armed he’d have mentioned it. 🙂

     

     

     

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #92474
    Paskal
    Spectator

    Yes, but St Peter did not usually tell bullshit

    #92482

    For what it’s worth, Delbruck’s answer to this question is that the heavier one was employed for defensive fire from camps and fortifications.

    #92483
    Paskal
    Spectator

    I do not believe it, I think that in combat, despite the horizontal handle of the scutum, legionaries took two pilum, moreover this is what explains Polybius !

    #92617
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    the pilum

    you could always have a look at this – which is currently on offer at a reduced price  as an ebook ( a purchase pop up will probably appear when it loads – just click cancel to have a look.)

    #92619
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    the pilum you could always have a look at this – which is currently on offer at a reduced price as an ebook ( a purchase pop up will probably appear when it loads – just click cancel to have a look.)

    Does Bishop have anything to say re: horn cantle saddle v stirrups? 😉

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #92620
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Oddly enough Bishop and Coulston’s Roman Military Equipment is also on sale at £8.03 on the same site! I believe he mentions the change from the 4 horned saddle to the cantle steppe saddle in the 5th century in there. How strange you should mention it.

    #92622
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    Oddly enough Bishop and Coulston’s Roman Military Equipment is also on sale at £8.03 on the same site! I believe he mentions the change from the 4 horned saddle to the cantle steppe saddle in the 5th century in there. How strange you should mention it.

    It was quite a controversy at one time, may still be. All those stirrupless kataphraktoi charging around with their 12 foot kontos defied logic 🙂

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #92625
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    I wondered if we were taking a stroll down Society of Ancients Fights of Old Lane.

    Couched lance versus ‘overarm prodding’ about anyone?

    How do you spell ‘disingenuous’?

    #92643
    Paskal
    Spectator

    One thing is certain, in the first century AD, there is no more light pilum and the heavy pilum receives a counterweight.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.