Home Forums Renaissance A very civil War.

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  • #104163

    Some random photos of our first ECW game. The Royalist English invaded the Lowlands & successfully confronted a Covenanter army.

    The centre of the battlefield

     

    You can see the Covenanter camp in the background.

    The Royalists were strong in Horse, the Covenanters in artillery….unfortunately scissors beats paper.

     

    Some of the Covenanter Horse. Looks good, performs poorly.

     

     

    Apologies for the lack of a coherent photo report, but we were too busy playing!

     

    donald

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by Deleted User.
    • This topic was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by Deleted User.
    • This topic was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by Deleted User.
    #104167
    Brendan Morrissey
    Participant

    I really wouldn’t allow the Covenanter horse that close to the enemy (in fact, if you can keep them off-table, even better!).

     

    Lovely armies – do you plan to expand them, at all?

    #104188

    – do you plan to expand them, at all?

    There were 750 points a side on table. I have about 100 points a side in addition. That’s about enough for a normal sized game.

    I also have a small, all plastic Parliamentarian army (4 P&S regiments, 2 mounted units & some Light artillery).

    And there’s about  4 yet to be painted units for various armies.

    Next August is the local Show, where we will stage an ECW game. My pals will bring something to this. One is working on a Montrose force, another says he can supply some P&S regiments for the English Royalists.

    So we  should field about 1000 figures in a devised “Invasion of Scotland” game. For us, a little small but I think the Punters will be impressed.

     

    donald

    #104209
    Etranger
    Participant

    I really wouldn’t allow the Covenanter horse that close to the enemy (in fact, if you can keep them off-table, even better!).

    They’ll be off the table soon enough!

    Lovely looking armies Ochoin, well worth the hard work and effort.

    #104219

    Thanks ET. I’m looking forward to a flurry of games with them then many years of ECW being in the repertoire.

    I only charged with the Covenanter Horse at the end of the game through desperation. They did die quickly. It’s the 1 dice per base in combat that really hurts.

    My future plan is to keep them in being: a threat. By adding a Commander to the front rank, they’ll go from Poor to Average or Average to Superior. This might sometimes be worth the risk. The other point is to provoke a charge from Cavaliers, then after losing the combat, rout off the table taking the ‘Floppy Hat’ bunch with them. well worth the exchange, I feel.

    donald

    #104243

    This white coat Pike & Shot regiment were the “unit of the battle”:

     

    donald

    #104855

    Breaking news!

    The Pele tower & a ruined church you can see in the photos are from the excellent Any scale models.They’re resin & paint up extremely well.
    The owner of Any scale, Stuart, has indicated he’s working on ” scratchbuilding some new 1:72 scale Scottish stone cottages, a ruined broch and a new larger tower house” in 1/72 scale.

    Certainly on my shopping list.

    donald

    #104999
    Brendan Morrissey
    Participant

    Why has the musketeer nearest the camera in the rear rank, been face-painted as Deputy Dawg, dagnabit?

    #105009

    Why has the musketeer nearest the camera in the rear rank, been face-painted as Deputy Dawg, dagnabit?

     

    If you’re going to go over photos of my figures with a magnifying glass, I’m leaving!

    In answer, not sure. Cheap camera? Trick of the light? Mascara ran?

    donald

    #105013
    ian pillay
    Participant

    Impressive stuff! For some unknown reason I though ECW armies were drab in colour, browns and greys however these look fantastic with lots of colour…. I think I might have to look more in to ECW.

    What figures and rules are you using…?

    Tally-Ho!

    #105023
    Steve Johnson
    Participant

    Very nice figures!

    #105026

    Impressive stuff! For some unknown reason I though ECW armies were drab in colour, browns and greys however these look fantastic with lots of colour…. I think I might have to look more in to ECW. What figures and rules are you using…?

     

    Ian, there are many more here with more expertise on the topic than me : Brendan, Etranger & Not Connard Sage to name but three.

    My understanding is that uniforms were issued to troops. In the English armies, they tried to give individual regiments the same coloured coat & pants.

    So you get ‘Hopton’s Bluecoats’, Osbourne’s Greencoats etc. How this worked in practice with clothes wearing out or new drafts of men can be imagined but I tend to stick to most Foot units having at least the same coat colour.

    The Scots definitely had uniformity with government issues of Hodden Grey (grey? beige? Some mixture?). Reputedly there was a unit of Foot in black (Erskine’s Ministers’ Regt) & some in red coats (veterans of the Irish campaign). Needless to say, I have included both types for variety. You also get unregimented highlanders wearing tartan kilts.

    So, quite colourful but you also have a pile of colourful flags…..many of which are also doubtful!

    Rules: Field of Glory;Renaissance

    Figures: a mix of 1/72 plastic (Revell & ACTA) & 20mm metal (mostly Tumbling Dice but also Warrior, Hinton Hunt & others).

    I’m very much enjoying wargaming the new period & am starting to read more too.

     

    donald

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by Deleted User.
    #105046
    ian pillay
    Participant

    Donald, thank you for the additional information on the ECW. I might have to start reading up on the subject. At the moment I have just got my little lad into ACW and Napoleonics using 1/72 plastics. We are having great fun.

    Good luck with the rest of the project and please keep posting the photographs. Outstanding work.

    Ian

     

    Tally-Ho!

    #105786
    Brendan Morrissey
    Participant

    Impressive stuff! For some unknown reason I though ECW armies were drab in colour, browns and greys however these look fantastic with lots of colour…. I think I might have to look more in to ECW. What figures and rules are you using…?

    Ian,

    Further to Donald’s answer, greys and browns would probably be quite accurate for the rank-and-file in the first months of the war, before sufficient quantities of the same-coloured cloth could be made up into coats (throughout the war, matching trousers were unusual, though not rare, and mainly limited to the Covenanters and the Royalist army at Oxford in 1643 and 1644).  However, troops in civilian clothing would also do for locally-raised forces throughout the war – and, of course, work well for either side.  Depending on your choice of rules, you can have great fun with local forces, both raised by the leading “big wig” on each side, which can be predominantly foot, or horse, according to what you have (or what you want to buy/paint) – and there are plenty of historical examples of both.

    Some folks – including at least one unit of re-enactors – still get confused by the coat colour and flag colour usually being different. From 1643 onwards, you start getting what we would think of today as “uniforms”: the Oxford army was in red and blue, some of the Parliament forces wore grey (probably undyed wool), Newcastle’s men were being referred to as “whitecoats” (probably just a very light grey, being undyed wool) throughout the war, not just at Marston Moor, and the Covenanters had their famous “hodden grey” (which could be anything from off-white, through beige, to the mid-grey usually used by wargamers – again, the product of using different mixes of undyed wool).

    Another point to bear in mind is that, as tactics developed, armies started forming their foot into “battalia” which might mean that a full-strength regiment (over 1,000 men) might be divided into two units, whilst smaller units might be combined, and their horse into squadron.  For example, in the Oxford army the foot was divided into three “tercios” (think of them as brigades) with three or four battalia in each; my guess, from looking at which regiments were in which tercio, is that one tercio had predominantly/entirely red coats (the majority colour across the army as a whole), another had predominantly blue, and the third was a mix of yellow and “white” (see above) being made up mostly of units from Newcastle’s army that had marched south with the Queen.  This means you can construct battalia from a mix of coat colours – and throw in some new recruits still in civvies, as Donald says.

    Hope that helps.

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