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  • #77009
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    What mechanics do people use to drop paratroopers or gliders on the gaming table?

    I listed a few on the Wargaming Mechanics blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.be/2017/11/airborne-landings.html

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #77035

    I really like the idea of just dropping paper chits or have them deployed from a box that passed over the table at a certain height. That’s probably how I would do it although I have never wargamed a full airborne operation before.

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    #77048
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    The pieces of paper method.

    Different heights to reflect the conditions – bad weather, flak, flaky pilots (and/or different size chits – bigger ones flutter further)

    Each piece uniquely marked and tied to orbat so you know who landed where, and you don’t get arguments about whether it was the vital support unit that dropped in the marsh or not.

    #77061
    John D Salt
    Participant

    The idea of dropping peices of paper to represent airborne landings goes back at least to the WRG “Armour and Infantry 1925-1950” rules published in 1973.

    All the best,

    John.

    #77064
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Thanks John!

    I was trying to remember where I’d seen this first.

    I knew I had been using this method from before 1977 and Featherstone’s book – I should have realised why  – I still use the WRG rules sometimes!

     

     

    #77117
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    I always sort of assumed Wargamging Airborne Operations by Featherstone would be the primary source, but given the remarks above w.r.t. WRG rules, I delved into my library. I only consulted Air Wargames (Featherstone, 1966) so far, but it also has a description of paper chits fluttering down the table.

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #77126
    willz
    Participant

    I have always found the best way to drop my paratroopers is the Featherstone method and the way to land gliders is to have the player who is landing gliders throw a paper glider they have made themselves.

    #77174
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Possibly Phil – Featherstone played no part in my entry to wargaming. I was working off the 1977 publication date in your blog and I knew I had been using the method in the early 70s.

     

    (Out of interest -was it the original 1966 printing of Air Wars you consulted or the John Curry revision? – I have no idea what was changed but John ‘improved’ several of Featherstone’s less successful efforts on reprinting).

    #77180
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    The idea of dropping peices of paper to represent airborne landings goes back at least to the WRG “Armour and Infantry 1925-1950” rules published in 1973. All the best, John.

     

    That’s where I first saw that mechanic. We thought it was genius!

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    #77193
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I use this method even for FOW. Simple and fun.

    #78178
    Ivan Sorensen
    Participant

    The only times I’ve done it has had the para’s already landed and scrambling to defend against an attack.

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    #95519
    Brian Handley
    Participant

    We use the paper drop or throw chits onto the table.    Gliders could have their landing point defoined.  Some glider pilots could navigate well.  It proably depends on the troops that are landing and how critical cohesion or lack of it features in your scenario.  If its a newbie we let him drop a few chits as practice (pathfiners dropping first).

    #97685
    hammurabi70
    Participant

    We use a die roll and drift.  As the basic unit is a company and the ground scale is accordingly fixed mass scattering does not really apply; it also makes a mess of the game balance.

    Paper chits might work for individual parachutes but even then it is best to have a chit for the first man in the chalk and then have a fixed or slightly randomised line for the rest of the chalk.  Real scattering will happen when there are multiple aircraft and dropping is done at night.

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