Home Forums WWI Anzac Day – how to commemorate without a fine

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  • #197711
    Avatar photoAndrew Beasley
    Participant

    Interesting article on the famous Anzac biscuit:

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/tweak-the-recipe-of-this-australian-biscuit-and-you-can-get-a-hefty-fine-or-even-jail-time-180984217/

    I’ll admit I’ve never tried one (official recipe at the end of the article) but they do sound nice 🙂

     

    #197717
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Can’t comment on the issue of the legality but my mother made Anzac biscuits every year. My grandfather was a veteran of the First World War. The biscuits are lovely!

    Robert

    #197718
    Avatar photoChris Pringle
    Participant

    I can confirm they are not only very tasty but also easy to make. (Though I only marked ANZAC Day with a whisky this year.)

    #197720
    Avatar photoOrm Embar
    Participant

    not a biscuit, just a memorial from St Mary’s Church, Harefield, Middlesex.

     

    #197721
    Avatar photoChris Pringle
    Participant

    not a biscuit, just a memorial from St Mary’s Church, Harefield, Middlesex.

    Well done.

    The Bulford Kiwi is worth seeing.

    #197725
    Avatar photoOrm Embar
    Participant

    I know of it, worst thing about the NZ part, was that the Maori Battalion that had been on the western front for 3 years of hard fighting, was not used as an occupieing unit, as it was deemed wrong to have natives standing guard over europeans….

    #197740
    Avatar photoOotKust
    Participant

    I know of it, worst thing about the NZ part, was that the Maori Battalion that had been on the western front for 3 years of hard fighting, was not used as an occupieing unit, as it was deemed wrong to have natives standing guard over europeans….

    hmm, lets see… re-writing history?

    • There was no such ‘thing’ as a Maori Battalion in WW-I.
      They were labourers- sappers. None were armed.
    • Hard work, fighting?
    • They were not a ‘military force’ thus could not ‘guard’.
    • Anything to the contrary is likely revisionist propaganda.

    You can angle for dismissing the actions of the past- yet ‘natives’ in all parts of the world were used as possible. With the possible exception of the ‘East India’ British Army, few were armed legally.

    Make any judgements you wish to, but in those circumstances and time there were not the options available to the conquered races.
    As for competence, that is another matter.

    As a New Zealander (4th Generation) of Anglo/Danish (throw in 1/8 Scot and Irish (ie one GGM)) working class, now retired, there are plenty in the upper classes of multiple origins here.

    Sadly looking at Gaza, Southern Asia, South America and the Caribbean,  and of course Ukraine, how can we see any advancement from 110 years ago. Deceit and hypocrisy, greed and malice remain the foremost human characteristics on show world wide.

    – –

    And why the Smithsonian writes about biscuits? It’s ANZAC, being an acronym for a start- and why 100 year old ‘regulations’ or AOP are relevant except to sensationalise  the issue.

    Did they invent it? Don’t know. But adding sugary syrup to help humanise hard tack worked.
    Personally we eat them all the time, store bought, but I don’t care for dessicated coconut in any form anyway. The real thing is much nicer!

    -d

    #197743
    Avatar photoOrm Embar
    Participant

    So the New Zealand Pioneer Battalion of the ANZAC forces didn’t exist how nice.

     

    #197833
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    There is a very detailed history of the Maori Pioneer Battalion in the Great War, including involvement in front line operations, written by Christopher Pugsley:

    Robert

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