Home Forums Fantasy General Fantasy Biblical Sands, or Samson the Barbarian

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  • #100978
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    I bought Burning Sands, as I thought it may be useful for my interest in the warfare of the Hebrew Bible, after all Hollywood films desert fantasy and the Bible in Tunisia or thereabouts…

    So, I thought I’d have a go, to test it out. Samson was always the obvious protagonist, but if anyone makes a 15mm Samson I’m not aware of it, so after the conversion of a Chariot Miniatures Sumerian slinger…

    …we could proceed.

     

    Previously in Judges:

    Samson has married an unnamed Philistine woman. She gave the answer to his riddle to her countrymen, costing Samson 30 sets of clothes, which he took from some other Philistines who he killed. It is not clear whether he washed the blood off the clothes before he handed them over.

    Some time later, at harvest time, he goes to visit his wife, taking a young goat, only to find that her father has given her to Samson’s best man. Samson is offered his younger sister-in-law by way of compensation. Samson decides to get his revenge on the Philistines, and destroys their crops, vineyards and olive groves using incendiary foxes.

    I mention this purely as an excuse to show off some more of my conversions, this time from model railway foxes…

    The Philistines in turn burn Samson’s wife and her father, encouraging Samson to slaughter even more of them, before running off to hide in a cave in his own country.

    The ensuing Philistine expedition to capture Samson provoked his own people, the tribe of Judah, to send 3000 men to find him and hand him over…

    Samson and his escort approach the Philistine camp. On the left, partly seen, is a dead ass. In the Biblical account Samson uses an ass’s jawbone as a weapon.

    As the Philistines see and run towards Samson he breaks his bonds and sprints to the dead ass to arm himself.

    Four Philistines attack Samson and he kills two before attacking their leader, who scores a critical hit on Samson.

    The Second group of Philistines attack Samson, injuring him, but he kills one and injures another, before is beaten by their leader who is able to make two unopposed attacks.

    In the Bible Samson managed to kill a thousand Philistines, but “the LORD came upon him in power”, something I had deliberately ignored. Before I have another go I need to look at an appropriate way to make use of Burning Sands’ “Foul Sorcery”.

    Although perhaps messrs Gershwin were right;

    “It ain’t necessarily so,

    It ain’t necessarily so,

    Things that you’re liable

    To read in the Bible,

    It ain’t necessarily so.”

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by Geof Downton.
    • This topic was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by Geof Downton.

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #100980
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Thanks for buying and sharing.

    What stats did you use for Samson and the Villains?
    P3,W2,V6 and P2,W1,V2 respectively?

    One suggestion that may work?
    Let the Villains attacks Samson, they will need to use Available Vitality to move into range, this may mean they have only 1 AV left when they close, or maybe even be forced to use all 2 AV leaving them with 0.
    Failing that, move Samson into HTH and save some AV either to defend or to move out of range of the Villains.

    If you were using 2 groups of 4 villains, 1 of whom was a minor character with better stats than a regular Villain, you would have to be very lucky to have won, not even the mighty Erland could take on 8 people in one go and triumph!

    😀

    PS: What happened to his mates, the ones he legged ahead of?

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by Mike.
    #100983
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Stats as you used for Erland and the attacking tribesmen. Two groups each of four Philistine plus a leader.

    Their cards at the beginning.

    I didn’t really expect Samson to have a chance, the Bible story is clear that it is God not Samson who is doing the work. At the risk of causing offence to believers I need, as I said, to use sorcery in lieu of God. I’m wondering about a temporary increase in available vitality. His mates were not his mates, they were going to hand him over in the interests of self preservation.

    The story can be found in Judges chapter 15.

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #100986
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    This is so cool.

    #100987
    Mike
    Keymaster

    I like the effort on the cards. What are Samsons markers?

    Birds of some sort?

    #100989
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Yep, Samson’s markers are doves; I couldn’t find angels!

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #100998
    John D Salt
    Participant

    Excellent stuff — more trouble than most of us have with the in-laws, and incendiary foxes make a nice change from flaming pigs.

    It’s not my period, but I wonder what source was used to determine the colour of Samson’s clothing (such as it is).

    The reference I have in mind on the subject is from the well-known Scottish song, “Johhny Lad”:

    “Noo Samson was a michty man, he focht wi’ cuddies’ jaws,
    “An’ he won a score o’ battles wearing crimson flannel drawers.”

    All the best,

    John.

    #101005
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    …wearing crimson flannel drawers.

    The archaeological evidence for the use of dyes made from various species of kermes scale insects is extensive, (see Koren ZC. 1993. The colors and dyes on ancient textiles in Israel. Pages 24–26 in Sorek C, Ayalon E, eds. Colors from Nature: Natural Colors in Ancient Times. Tel Aviv (Israel): Eretz Israel Museum for example) so I am certain that your source is accurate…

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by Geof Downton.

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #101017
    Mike
    Keymaster

    By the way, what colours did you use for those shields?
    I want to copy that effect!

    #101026
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    By the way, what colours did you use for those shields?

    Grey Vallejo primer, Vallejo Beasty Brown on the “leather” bit of the shield. Vallejo Black then Citadel Warplock Bronze on the studs. Finally a wash over the whole model with Winsor and Newton Nut Brown ink. I’m far too idle to do proper shading!

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #101070
    David Barnes
    Participant

    Excellent!  I’ll have to get the rules & try!  Khurasan makes a lovelly Frazella Conan with young lady that I use as Kohen the Barbarian/Herakulese.

    FYI.  The “jawbone of an ass”  was in fact a khepesh, just about the best sword for in-close work against spears and quilt/leather armour.

    #101074
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Khurasan makes a lovelly Frazella Conan with young lady

    The young lady in question is my Queen of Sheba, with some Khurasan Inca bearers;

    I have heard the jawbone of an ass = khopesh before, but the Hebrew phrase is best translated as “fresh donkey’s cheek”, so I’m not convinced that a metal blade was intended. Samson is supposed to have discarded the bone, giving the place the name Ramoth Lehi, “Jawbone Hill”, but I wonder if the story was composed to explain the name.

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #101130
    Private Snafu
    Participant

    Nice vignette!

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