Home Forums Air and Sea Air Blood Red Skies

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #89607
    Avatar photokyoteblue
    Participant

    Just picked up the Battle of Briton box set from Bolt Action/Warlord Games. No idea how to play it or even if I like it. I have never played an air game so it will be a whole new world for me. I also got the Mitsubishi A6-M5 Zero box as well as the air war in the Pacific is what I want to do. Wildcats will be the next expansion of the game or so I was told.

    Anyone else played this game and if so what did you think of it?

    #89634
    Avatar photoJohn D Salt
    Participant

    I haven’t played it, but I was very pleased to see the publishers are dishing out a free .pdf of the basic rules. Having had a gander at these, it seems to me that a good deal of thought has done into them. The idea of “advantaged”, “neutral” and “disadvantaged” states is interesting, and different from the original definitions as used in SPI’s “Air War” and Jim Webster’s “Air Superiority”, “Air Strike” and so on. I rather like the idea that opposing aircraft need to beat the other side down to a disadvantaged state before they can get a kill. I would be interested to hear how you get on with the rules once you start playing. One thing baffles me; being advantaged meas that you go before a less-advantaged opponent, whereas in almost every wargame I have ever seen it is an advatage to go last, when you have seen where your opponent moved.

    All the best,

    John.

    #89636
    Avatar photozippyfusenet
    Participant

    John, do you have a link to the free pdf of the basic rules? I plan to attend the Drums Along The Maumee game convention in a few weeks, and a demo of Blood Red Skies is on the PEL. I hope to get stuck in. It would be helpful to skim the rules ahead of the game.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    #89639
    Avatar photokyoteblue
    Participant

    Just had a look at Armaments In Miniature and they do a line of 1/200  resin aircraft for WW2.

    #89660
    Avatar photoJohn D Salt
    Participant

    John, do you have a link to the free pdf of the basic rules?

    Blood Red Skies PDF Starter Rulebook

    I say ‘free’, it will cost you the divulging of a mailing address and an e-mail address, but no money.

    All the best,

    John.

    #90034
    Avatar photokyoteblue
    Participant

    First outing with the rules, I got shot down twice. I need to re-read the rules!!

    #102200
    Avatar photoSteve Burt
    Participant

    I haven’t played it, but I was very pleased to see the publishers are dishing out a free .pdf of the basic rules. Having had a gander at these, it seems to me that a good deal of thought has done into them. The idea of “advantaged”, “neutral” and “disadvantaged” states is interesting, and different from the original definitions as used in SPI’s “Air War” and Jim Webster’s “Air Superiority”, “Air Strike” and so on. I rather like the idea that opposing aircraft need to beat the other side down to a disadvantaged state before they can get a kill. I would be interested to hear how you get on with the rules once you start playing. One thing baffles me; being advantaged meas that you go before a less-advantaged opponent, whereas in almost every wargame I have ever seen it is an advatage to go last, when you have seen where your opponent moved. All the best, John.

    That’s what I thought when I read the rules, but having played them, all I can say is it works very well. Going first is generally an advantage in these rules; you get to shoot first, you get to try and out manoeuvre the opponent or get on his tail first (both of which will disadvantage him).

    Very nice set of rules, and lots of interesting tactical decision making. Having wingmen is critical as it stops others getting on your tail

    #102293
    Avatar photoDeleted User
    Member

    I read the rules and thought the advantage mechanics was nifty but couldn’t wrap my head around how it works for lots of aircraft. Are all planes with advantage the same as each other or are there gradients ranking which has the most advantage and which is most disadvantaged?

    #102319
    Avatar photoSteve Burt
    Participant

    All advantaged planes are the same. But planes with higher pilot skill get to go first (and if there is still a tie, highest top speed is used as a tiebreak).

    Example incident. Two advantaged planes facing each other about 4 inches apart. One has a veteran pilot, the other a normal one, so the veteran gets to go first. He burns advantage to do an Immelman – moving 7 inches forwards and then spinning 180 degrees. He is now neutral, but he is also on the tail of the other plane, which drops to disadvantaged. Now it is time for his pilot action; he could climb back up to advantaged, try to outmanouevre an enemy plane to drop it one level, or he could shoot at a plane more disadvantaged than himself. The obvious thing might be to shoot at the guy whose tail he has just got on, especially as you can only shoot down disadvantaged aircraft; hits on others just drop them one advantage level.

    Had the other plane had a wingman covering his back, the veteran would not have been able to get on his tail.

    It’s a very nice system; much more tactical nuance than meets the eye.

    In the example above, the risk to the veteran pilot is that some gets on *his* tail, so perhaps the next thing will be to move a wingman up to give him some cover.

     

    #102341
    Avatar photoDeleted User
    Member

    Thanks for the explanation.

    Pilot A took an action and drops from Advantage to Neutral while B drops from Advantage to Disadvantage?

    Sounds weird to me, I probably have to see it in action to understand this.

    #102543
    Avatar photoSteve Burt
    Participant

    Pilot A lost a level of advantage because he did a complex manoeuvre (referred to as ‘burning advantage’ in the rules)

    Pilot B dropped to disadvantaged because he was tailed; tailed pilots always drop to disadvantaged.

    If pilot A had not been in position to get on B’s tail, he could instead have used his pilot action to outmanoeuvre B. If he is higher skill, that is automatic, otherwise B gets to roll. If a plane is outmanoeuvred, it drops 1 advantage level, so B would drop to neutral in the example above.

    You really need to try the rules to see how it works; since the basic rules are free, there’s no good reason not to, and a game plays out in an hour or two at most.

    #102546
    Avatar photokyoteblue
    Participant

    I need to paint my Zeros and Wildcats.

    #103100
    Avatar photoMaff Sparkes
    Participant

    Watch “Hurricane”; that’ll get you throwing Hurricanes around over Kent…..

    #103345
    Avatar photoSteve Burt
    Participant

    Played another game last night, this time with the full rules with cards and clouds in play. That really enhances the game. The Spitfire’s tight turn and the Me109s climbing and diving ability came into play. The aces had special abilities, RAF had Home Advantage, but were Poorly trained.

    The stands that come with the game don’t look as nice as my home-made stands which show altitude, but they are very functional and easy to use.

    The only thing I’d change is the tie breaker for planes with the same speed. It’s a huge advantage to go first; in the first game we used Spitfire 2s which are just a tiny bit faster than Me109, but didn’t actually arrive until November 1940, so after the BoB was over. This time, we used Spitfire 1s which are just a tiny bit slower. In both games, it was a fairly easy win for whoever had the planes which went first, but with such tiny differences in speed it seems too much of an advantage. I think in future if two planes have actual speeds within 10mph of each other we’ll dice to see who goes first if advantage and pilot skill and coarse plane speed are all tied.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.