Home Forums Air and Sea Naval British and Commonwealth Warship Camouflage of WW II

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  • #192786
    Avatar photoNot Connard Sage
    Participant

    Rekindling my long ago interest in naval warfare (it’s Sam Mustafa’s fault!), I’m looking for more recent information about paint schemes for the Royal Navy and Deutsches Kriegsmarine. To that end, are Mal Wright’s and Leon and Asmussen’s series of books worth having?

     

    Obvious contrarian and passive aggressive old prat, who is taken far too seriously by some and not seriously enough by others.

    #192794
    Avatar photoMcKinstry
    Participant

    Mal’s work is top notch and for depth and detail, I’ve not encountered better. I have the four Alan Raven books on British Camouflage as well as the single volume on Royal Navy Camouflage by Peter Hodges and both are useful but I believe they are out of print. I’m unfamiliar with the Leon and Asmussen books but for individual classes, the Man O’ War series from RSV Publications did a very good job on Royal Navy cruiser and battleship classes.

    I have some of the Squadron Signal books on the Kreigsmarine but in my opinion, the data and images available on the web are as good as anything I’ve seen in print.

     

     

    The tree of Life is self pruning.

    #192797
    Avatar photoAlbert of Winterpig
    Participant

    Mal’s are the best on British and commonwealth around.

    #192814
    Avatar photoNot Connard Sage
    Participant

    Good to know. Thanks both.

     

    The German volumes are published by the same people. Anyone got those? 🙂

    Obvious contrarian and passive aggressive old prat, who is taken far too seriously by some and not seriously enough by others.

    #192887
    Avatar photoMcKinstry
    Participant

    I have seen that Leon & Asmussen book and failed to remember the authors. It is quite good and as I recall, very good on the changes throughout the war which were pretty common for the Kreigsmarine.

    The tree of Life is self pruning.

    #192896
    Avatar photoNot Connard Sage
    Participant

    I have seen that Leon & Asmussen book and failed to remember the authors. It is quite good and as I recall, very good on the changes throughout the war which were pretty common for the Kreigsmarine.

    Thanks. This could get expensive! 🙂

    I sometimes think that seamen spent more of their time painting than doing anything else…

    Obvious contrarian and passive aggressive old prat, who is taken far too seriously by some and not seriously enough by others.

    #192926
    Avatar photoMcKinstry
    Participant

    I understand the various turret colors as recognition aids and they certainly are less of an advertisement than the Italian barber poles but still, bright turret tops combined with a camouflage scheme, not to mention a often prominent swastika on the deck, would seem counterintuitive.

    The tree of Life is self pruning.

    #192933
    Avatar photoGuy Farrish
    Participant

    I sometimes think that seamen spent more of their time painting than doing anything else…

    Nearly…my Dad spent a lot of his time after the end of the war demobbing conscripts at a naval air station. They started off at the end of ’45 drawing a rum ration for a few hundred a month. In the May of ’46 the base stopped flying ops and by the autumn the demob lot were down to a trickle, but somehow the rum ration kept coming for the full quota. They tried their best, but failed to keep up with the supply, so he spent quite a lot of ’47 travelling round local pubs seeing if any landlords might have a use for it…

    They did, however, paint everything else that didn’t move.

    Not sure what colours they painted them after all that rum!

    #192934
    Avatar photoNot Connard Sage
    Participant

    I understand the various turret colors as recognition aids and they certainly are less of an advertisement than the Italian barber poles but still, bright turret tops combined with a camouflage scheme, not to mention a often prominent swastika on the deck, would seem counterintuitive.

    Well, to be fair, the Royal Navy’s method of IDing its ships was hardly genius. Writing EX on the turret tops of the Exeter (for example) not only told  German aviators what class the ship belonged to, it also informed them of the exact ship it was.

     

    Obvious contrarian and passive aggressive old prat, who is taken far too seriously by some and not seriously enough by others.

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