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This topic contains 39 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by Hafen von Schlockenberg Hafen von Schlockenberg 3 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #115322
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Pretend for whatever reason, you could only embark on one C19th Colonial campaign project. One only.

    What’s it to be? Zulus? The NW Frontier? The Sudan? The Foreign Legion in North Africa? Something more esoteric?

    Please include reasons or your choice whether it be a particularly tasty figure range, you have a yen to do a specific terrain type, a rule set that lends itself particularly to this conflict, a boyhood love of an inspirational film: whatever.

     

    donald

    #115335

    Etranger
    Participant

    You may have missed the target forum here mate!

     

    It would be a toss up between France in Indochina, or North West Frontier. I’ve got suitable scenery for either in 15mm, but only a few possible figures.

    #115339
    Harry Faversham
    Harry Faversham
    Participant

    NWF with Fistful of Lead rules…

    Harry Faversham like stiff upper lipped English, Lord Flashard like backstabbing English, hairy arsed Highlanders, Mad Mullahs and wild eyed bloodthirsty Tribesmen!

    ps I agree with Etranger… I think yer TARDIS’s time space continuum plug thingy’s worked a tad loose.

    "Wot did you do in the war Grandad?"

    "I was with Harry... At The Bridge!"

    #115341
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    India around the time of the Rebellion, I guess. Mainly because of some inspirational photos I’ve seen on this forum.

    I’d reserve the right to decide at a later point whether to do it as a “traditional” wargame project or more of a skirmish-adventure project emulating old adventure fiction.

    #115344
    General Slade
    General Slade
    Participant

    I know bugger all about the period but I won’t let that stop me from offering an opinion.  I would opt from the North West Frontier just because it would give me an excuse to watch The Man Who Would Be King againIt also seems to offer a lot more variety than the other options.  Lots of exotic sounding units and colourful uniforms.

    In fact, I have almost talked myself into giving it a go …

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by General Slade General Slade.
    #115350

    Chris Pringle
    Participant

    Does Second Boer War fall within your definition of C19 colonial? If so: that, please.

    It’s a war that didn’t excite me for gaming at all, with visions of tedious games of frontal slogs by masses of Brits pinned down by Boer rifle fire. However, my South African buddy Anton has run a number of games for us that have turned out to be really good fun and distinctively different. It has the extreme asymmetry that I guess most colonial conflicts do, which presents different tactical challenges to the two sides. There are the times when the Brits get pinned down and die in heaps, but the open terrain and big battlefields actually gives room for tons of sweeping maneuver. So far we’ve done Colenso, Spion Kop, Modder Spruit, Magersfontein and Paardeberg. Excellent games without exception. Eg AAR here:

    https://bloodybigbattles.blogspot.com/2018/07/more-boer-war-modder-spruit-ladysmith.html

    So if I had to start from scratch and do armies and terrain for one colonial conflict, that would be it, for asymmetry, tactical interest and maneuver.

    Chris

    Bloody Big BATTLES!

    https://uk.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/BBB_wargames/info

     

    #115354

    Maori Wars, for the asymetry.

    No,wait — Xhosa Wars, for the beautiful Perry figures.

    No, wait — Indian Mutiny, for the wild variety of “uniforms” — plus elephants.

    No, wait — Sikh Wars, for the opportunity of gaming Napoleonic-style battles with the entire OB’s on the table —  plus Akalis and camel guns.

    No, wait — Masai, for the color, and Copplestone figures.

    No, wait — NW Frontier — bagpipe music while I paint and play  (I’m aware that some consider the term “bagpipe music” an oxymoron).

    No wait —

    No — I can’t. I just can’t.

    #115357
    irishserb
    irishserb
    Participant

    I’ve found the colonial gaming era to provide maybe the greatest number of interesting and inviting subjects for the table top, but once introduced to the Boxer Rebellion, I had found the colonial conflict that most interested me.  At the time, given finances and available figures, I went with the Frontier range of 15mm figs, as they offered almost all of the figures that could be asked for, and used TSATF.  In the end though, despite painting a couple thouasnd figures, and buiding a portion of Peking,  I could not ignite much interest in the period in my gaming group, and despite my continued interest in the period, I eventually left it for a somewhat different approach.

    In the 1990s, as the various figures associated with “darkest Africa” started to become available, I realized that another colonial subject, that had floated in the back of my mind, could finally be brought to the table top.  The idea had originally been inspired by the movie “Nate and Hayes”, which  later grew dramatically after reading a book called “The People From the Horizon” and reading an article in Miniature Wargames about a fabulously done traditional pirate game/campaign.

    After a bit more research into the history, development, and exploitation of the Pacific, ranging from Polynesia to Australia to Micronesia, and then to China, I came up with an adventure game that I called “Ponape” after Ben Pease’s destination in “Nate and Hayes”.  The game manifested as a light role-playing miniatures game set in the later Victorian era, and focusing on piracy and adventure in the Pacific.

    While somewhat outside the scope implied by the question above, Ponape proved to be my favorite colonial gaming experience, setting factions of military and/or civilians working with and against each other for survival and to build fortune.  The game was set on various Pacific islands or at sea, and featured ocean going gunboats and elaborate island terrain all in 28mm.  Rules were a home-brew system, and figures ranged from various colonial and old west lines from Foundry, Copplestone, Cannon Fodder, Old Glory, Essex, and many more.

    Military factions struggled to secure rights for naval coaling stations with local natives, who might have interest in guns, shrunken heads, gold, or just fighting off other tribes/navies/civilians.  Civilian groups consisted of pirates, black-birders, traders, antiquarian and scientific explorers, and many more, who each had one or more objectives involving kidnapping, theft, discovery, rescue, policing, etc.

    I haven’t run any games of it in several years, and even thought of getting rid of it at one point after my gaming group disbanded.  But, I’ve missed the games and intend to bring it back as a convention game as my free time grows in the coming years.  Though some of you have probably seen them, there are pics of some of the games and bits here, for those who haven’t:

    http://irishserb.blogspot.com/2012/07/the-ships-of-ponape-28mm-colonial.html

    http://irishserb.blogspot.com/2012/07/ponape-pacific-island-for-colonial.html

    http://irishserb.blogspot.com/2012/07/mission-to-pingelap-28mm-colonial.html

    #115360
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    You may have missed the target forum here mate!

     

    Should it have gone in Air & Sea or Ancients?

     

    I’m going for the AZW. I quite liked painting 300 Zulus. No, really.

    But I really liked painting the British forces. Red-coated, pith helmeted British infantry: best uniform eva!

    And the Colonial & auxilary units (NMP, 17th Lancers, Naval Brigade & Boers etc) add a lot of variety.

    Clearly, the movie, “Zulu” has an impact and the rolling, grassy plains are an appealing backdrop (with dongas to hide your Zulus in!)

     

    donald

    BTW the Boxer Rebellion is appealing but no figures in “my” scale.

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    • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by Ochoin Ochoin.
    #115366

    Ah, Zulu War, my first love. The “classic” uniform. And I enjoyed painting Zulus too — though I really, really hated painting all those contrasting shield laces!

    Those lovely Ral Partha figures were sold off many years ago. I still have 1500 15mm Zulus in a tub, awaiting paint. Someday. . .

    Ooh, Boxer Rebellion! Sorry, I still can’t choose. You’re a cruel man, Ochoin.

    Irishserb, I remember seeing your games at cons; always looked like people were having tons o’ fun.

    Oh, BTW,General Slade– ever see Northwest Frontier/Flame Over India? Here’s a trailer:

    But the whole film is on youtube:

    And don’t forget the classic:

    #115370
    Autodidact-O-Saurus
    Autodidact-O-Saurus
    Participant

    Hmmmm…. I think Airfix British and Zulus were the very first wargaming armies I ever had. TSATF. Though I think I only ever played one game with them. Typical. I still have a soft spot for the Thin Red Line. I still have some 54mm A-Z figures sitting on my painting desk. Only now I use them as an excuse to say “Someday I’ll purchase ‘The Men Who Would Be Kings” and have a go.

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #115386
    Ivan Sorensen
    Ivan Sorensen
    Participant

    Anything involving
    A: French Foreign Legion
    B: Musketry

    Nordic Weasel Games
    https://sites.google.com/site/nordicweaselgames/

    #115388
    Patrice
    Patrice
    Participant

    The French in “Western Sudan” (today Mali and surrounding areas) as some years ago I found on Gallica (the French National Library website) links to books written by officers and travellers about their experiences there in the 1880s, fascinating texts (including a book from a Navy officer who built a small ship at Bamako to explore the river Niger!) but mostly unknown because France has a difficult relation with its colonial past.

    http://www.argad-bzh.fr/argad/en.html
    http://www.anargader.net/

    #115410
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    The “exotic”* Colonial conflicts look very appealing.

    However, as we are in the midst of downsizing (from a house the size of an airplane hanger to one the size of a doghouse) I doubt if I’ll ever embark on anything new.No room.

    donald

     

     

     

    * yeah. I know: *all* Colonial wars are exotic by definition but you know what I mean

    #115411
    grizzlymc
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    For me, if it’s one, and only one, it must be second Afghan war. But, of course, a lot of those figs work with NW Frontier, as do your early war desert troops.

    #115412
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I cut my gaming teeth on TSATF and have gamed most of the wars mentioned above.  I’m interested in doing FIW AWI and ACW right now.

    #115416
    MartinR
    MartinR
    Participant

    My colonial stuff is all for the Sudan, although I’ve dabbled in NWF too.

    So I guess a mix of The Four Feathers and Lives of a Bengal Lancer!

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #115434
    DM
    DM
    Participant

    The wider side of the Sudan conflict, it wasn’t all desert battles, some of the campaigns fought to the South took place in more fertile lands, and with an array of interesting local forces

    #115438

    Stanley and Emin Pasha — a “Ripping Yarn” indeed!

    #115445
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    I would do the Sudan.  This is because it would remind me of one of the most enjoyable games I’ve ever played.  Back when Peter Gilder ran his Wargames Holiday Centre he put on a Sudan game for us punters as part of our week of gaming.  It all went well, at first, as the relief column slogged up the Nile, complete with supporting gunboat.  Our mission was to rescue the Governor and his beautiful daughter who were part of a besieged garrison.

    In attempting to have the gunboat support us all the way to the objective we had to force it through some rapids.  It got wrecked.  The natives appeared in ever increasing numbers until only the officers from each regiment were left.  In a moment of epic Victorian heroism/futility the officers mounted up and charged into the oncoming horde of the enemy.  It would have been medals all round had anyone survived to tell the tale.

    I’ve rarely had so much fun from a game, and, knowing nothing about the Sudan beforehand, it prompted me to buy some books on the subject.  Games like this stay in the memory.

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #115980
    telzy amber
    telzy amber
    Participant

    Donald what do you mean?

    BTW the Boxer Rebellion is appealing but no figures in “my” scale.

    What is “your” scale? There are two very nice 15mm ranges, Blue Moon and Old Glory 15s. I’m sure there are others

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by telzy amber telzy amber.
    #115982
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Donald what do you mean?

    BTW the Boxer Rebellion is appealing but no figures in “my” scale.

    What is “your” scale? There are two very nice 15mm ranges, Blue Moon and Old Glory 15s. I’m sure there are others

    Apologies. I only do 1/72 plastics & 20mm metals. No other scale need apply.

     

    donald

    #115992

    Are none of the ones listed here to your liking?

    http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/PeriodList.aspx?period=38

    #115995
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Haf, Red Box made awful Boxer Rebellion figures.

    A pity.

     

    donald

    #116006

    Fair enough — we all have our own standards.

    I’d note, though, there is a difference between “no figures in my scale” and “no figures in my scale that I like“.

    #116009

    Gone Fishing
    Participant

    I’ve always thought the Stan Johansson 20mm Boxer range looked rather good.

    19th century Colonials was, along with samurai, my first wargaming love. Back in the day I painted hundreds and hundreds figures for the Sudan campaign, and memories of those times, and the games we had, still bring a smile. These days my passion is 16th century campaigning in the New World – Spanish rodeleros, war-dogs, cannibals, lost cities and fabulously wealthy empires all offer tremendous scope for exciting games – but as that’s not pertinent to the question I’ll say no more… 🙄

     

     

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by  Gone Fishing.
    #116018
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Fair enough — we all have our own standards. I’d note, though, there is a difference between “no figures in my scale” and “no figures in my scale that I like“.

     

    Are you suggesting I’m a prima donna (he says, with a sniff, tossing his head haughtily).

     

    “I’ve always thought the Stan Johansson 20mm Boxer range looked rather good” Who? I’ll track these down.

     

    donald

    #116022

    Gone Fishing
    Participant
    #116024

    Prima donna? No, of course not!

    Diva? Hmm. . .

    #116025
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Here you go, Donald! https://www.stanjohansenminiatures.com/boxer.htm

     

    Thank you. They don’t look too bad at all. How would they stack up to the 1/72 Orion Boxers, do you know?

    I am tempted to embark upon a Peking Legation project with relatively few Westerners and a couple of  (recyclable) hordes of Boxers using TMWMBK’s rules.

    Haf: you’re forgiven (he says, loftily & with some disdain)

     

    donald

    #116028
    Harry Faversham
    Harry Faversham
    Participant

    Hmmmm…. I think Airfix British and Zulus were the very first wargaming armies I ever had.

    You might think that… but you’d be wrong!

    "Wot did you do in the war Grandad?"

    "I was with Harry... At The Bridge!"

    #116029
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    Hmmmm…. I think Airfix British and Zulus were the very first wargaming armies I ever had.

    You might think that… but you’d be wrong!

     

    Quite.

    Airfix didn’t produce any late 19th century British AFAIK, and the only ‘Zulu’ types were the natives in the Tarzan set. 🙂

     

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #116030
    Cameronian
    Cameronian
    Participant

    Pretend for whatever reason, you could only embark on one C19th Colonial campaign project. One only. What’s it to be? Zulus? The NW Frontier? The Sudan? The Foreign Legion in North Africa? Something more esoteric? Please include reasons or your choice whether it be a particularly tasty figure range, you have a yen to do a specific terrain type, a rule set that lends itself particularly to this conflict, a boyhood love of an inspirational film: whatever. donald

    Sudan – specifically the Gordon Relief Expedition. HaT Camel Corps, Naval guns and artillery, Esci and Waterloo infantry sets (the latter as it contains mounted officers and Egyptian troops). This force operated in two separate parts, so numbers are reasonable and you can choose camels or highlanders.  Gaps can be filled from Newline 20mm ranges.

    Terrain is desert, dunes and oasises.

    Watch ‘Khartoum’, Charleton Heston and Laurence Olivier.

    Did a desert column force organized for HOTT rules.  Haven’t got around to the Mahdists yet (HaT infantry and Newline cavalry).

    'The time has come" The walrus said. "To talk of many things: Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--Of cabbages--and kings--And why the sea is boiling hot--And whether pigs have wings."

    #116036
    Autodidact-O-Saurus
    Autodidact-O-Saurus
    Participant

    You might think that… but you’d be wrong!

    What?! My ageing memory is leading me down the garden path to the poisonous apple of historical fantasy? Inconceivable!

    After a quick trip to the Plastic Soldier Review site… the Zulus and Brits I remember were Esci. However, at the same time I did have a Velveeta cheese box full of French Napoleonics which were definitely Airfix. Never did have any Brits. Funny thing, though. I distinctly remember the Victorian Brits being made in the pale yellow plastic of the Napoleonics, not the tan shown on PSR. Now I wonder…. Generally my visual memory is better than my declarative memory. But now I wonder….

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #116052
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Funny thing, though. I distinctly remember the Victorian Brits being made in the pale yellow plastic of the Napoleonics, not the tan shown on PSR. Now I wonder…. Generally my visual memory is better than my declarative memory. But now I wonder….

    The original plastic was indeed cream & a later production was tan.

    Fun Fact: many plastic sets come out in several colours & collectors (there are lots) will buy examples of every different available colour.

    These chaps don’t paint figures, talk about “authentic colours” (ie British colonial troops in red plastic etc) & get very, very irate if you suggest they spray paint them any colour they like.

     

    donald

    #116169
    Harry Faversham
    Harry Faversham
    Participant

    Yep, The Zulu War figures were Esci, I’ve got a load of them somewhere, The British were cream coloured and the Zulus dark brown. Back in the day we toyed with making a Zulu army out of the warriors in the Tarzan set, and converting German WW1 infantry, into redcoats. If memory serves, you got about three shield armed warriors per Airfix box…

    even the combined pocket/paper round money of our little gang couldn’t afford it!

    "Wot did you do in the war Grandad?"

    "I was with Harry... At The Bridge!"

    #116172
    General Slade
    General Slade
    Participant

    Oh, BTW,General Slade– ever see Northwest Frontier/Flame Over India?

    Hi Hafen,

    Sorry for not getting back to you sooner.  I haven’t seen Northwest Frontier or Gunga Din but thanks for the links. I have checked them out and I am definitely going to watch them.  I am in the mood for a bit of rip-roaring adventure.

     

    #116186

    No worries, General.

    NW Frontier is somewhat forgotten these days. But you haven’t seen Gunga Din?! Oh my!   Admittedly, it approaches Pulp at times, but Sam Jaffee climbing the tower to warn the British column always brings a thrill.

    Of course, that hasn’t prevented it from being parodied over the years — including in the tontine sequence at the beginning of “The Wrong Box”:

    #116190
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    The best Gunga Din parody scene ever from the immortal Peter Sellers:

     

     

    ‘The Party’ is also one of the funniest movies ever made IMHO. Sellers is in “brown face” which makes it a bit problematical now.

     

    donald

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Ochoin Ochoin.
    #116195

    Great scene, Ochoin; thanks for posting. Confession time for me, now — I’ve never seen “The Party”. Another one for the list.

    BTW, Peter Sellers was also in “The Wrong Box”, though with so many legendary actors packing the film, he had only two short (if memorable) scenes:

    “You’d never think there were two Pratts in one room, would you?”

    Speaking of film (and back on topic), I should mention that my desire to do the Maori Wars goes way back to seeing “Utu” in its first release:

    Took a long time for good figures to be available, though!

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