Home Forums WWII Churchill's Secret Army – The Auxiliaries & Special Duty Units

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Jemima Fawr Jemima Fawr 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #105790
    carojon
    carojon
    Participant

    Elite raiding forces played a significant role in Britain’s military capability during WWII and much has been written recording the exploits of units such as the SAS, Commandos and others.

    However due to the secrecy of their setting up and the role they were designed to play should Britain have been invaded in WWII the role of the stay-behind forces known as the Auxiliaries and Special Duty Units has had a lot less coverage and much still needs to be done to learn more about these units dotted around Britain ready to form the core of early resistance to a German invasion.

    I was fortunate to hear a presentation by CART (Coleshill Auxiliary Research Team) covering the activities of one of these patrols set to operate in my home part of East Devon and have put together a post recording the talk and inviting people who might know more about patrols operating in their area to get in contact with the team.

    If you would like to know more then follow the link to JJ’s

    https://jjwargames.blogspot.com/2018/12/churchills-secret-army-auxiliary-and.html

    Jonathan (JJ)

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    #105823
    hammurabi70
    hammurabi70
    Participant

    The BBC did a documentary about them.

     

    This on Youtube.

    #105837
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    I saw that programme, very interesting it was too.

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #106004
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    My mate and I used to play in a very large Auxiliary Hide when we were kids.  It was about three times the size of the usual hide, with several connected chambers, now largely collapsed.  It’s in the woods right next to the Bluestone holiday complex and Oakwood theme park.

    My mate’s grandfather showed us where it was and it’s highly likely that he was one of them.  I also recently discovered that our Scout leader was an Auxiliary – he’d been a teenager at the time and his service with the Auxiliaries ended when he was called up (he fought through Normandy and beyond).

     

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #107094

    Fredd Bloggs
    Participant

    My Grandfather was (and my dad would have been had his dad not been), he had been a Royal Marine in the Boer War and WW1 (in the Naval Division) and was a game keeper in Hampshire, so was well versed in both Military and the land. Dad showed me one of their camps in the mid 70s, also how they had undermined the local bridge to make it easy to blow, and where the water meadow and river flood defences were marked for demolition to slow down any advance. In Hampshire just flooding the roads is an issue as most of them are up to 6 foot lower than the fields around them, however it would have been temporary as being on chalk it would have drained quite fast as well. They also had a route into the heart of the airfield (Odiham) but dad did not know where that was but suspected a tunnel into a basement of the newly build buildings.

     

    Always wondered about that as a post Sealowe game, Scallywags popping up in the middle of a key German held Airfield (the head of the Luftwaffe had it earmarked as his command base). So inside the ring defences….

    #107116
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    Strange things do occasionally pop up on RAF Stations – a few years ago, one of them found a whole series of demoltion charges under the runways and another dug up a brace of ‘disappearing’ turrets.  At Uxbridge in the 1980s, the Station Warrant Officer found the key to a bunker and decided to pop inside for a quick look, only to find a perfectly-preserved sector fighter command station, with everything still in place, as if they’d simply locked up at the end of a day in 1940 and not come back!

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Jemima Fawr Jemima Fawr.

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #107120

    Fredd Bloggs
    Participant

    The oddest thing of course about that, was it was Group command for 10 Group under Sir Keith Parkes. Last I heard they were threatening to shut Uxbridge.

    #107148
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    The oddest thing of course about that, was it was Group command for 10 Group under Sir Keith Parkes. Last I heard they were threatening to shut Uxbridge.

    RAF Uxbridge shut down some time ago, but the bunker museum is still open to visit.  A shame about RAF Uxbridge, but least the bunker is more generally accessible now!  The retired WO who rediscovered it and established it as a museum sadly passed away shortly before Uxbridge closed, which was enormously sad as he was a truly superb speaker and I saw him actually reduce teenagers to tears through his descriptions of the battle.

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

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