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  • #163345

    I’ve just posted an article about how I keep track of my toys. Everybody has a different way of doing this. Some are more advanced than others… 😉

    Come on over and take a look at my system at Petite Guerre.

    How do you do it?

    Muster landing page

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #163346
    Mike
    Keymaster

    I have so few I just look at them to see what I have 😛

    #163347

    Oh, that wouldn’t work for me. Too much of a hoarder!

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #163350
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Keep track? What is this strange concept?

    I have so few painted and so many unpainted I wouldn’t waste precious painting time (rare enough as is) on tracking things.

    Good on you though for being so organised.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    #163351
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Keep track? What is this strange concept?

    I’m not sure, but I think it may be the system which prevents unwanted multiple purchases of the same thing, because they’ve been in Mount Lead for so long that you have forgotten buying them first time…

    Whatever it is, I’ve never managed to achieve it!

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #163352
    Alex
    Participant

    I’m just an excel spreadsheet kinda guy! And that’s mostly so I can gain a sense of achievement by being able to ‘tick off’ what is actually painted (a very small percentage of the overall collection shamefully!)

    Alex (Does Hobby Stuff)
    practising hobby eclecticism

    #163357
    Andrew Beasley
    Participant

    Lost count the number of times over the years I’ve bought two of the same figure or set of rules in error as I could not find out where I had put the first or even worse ‘downsized’ and changed my mind.

    A few years ago I tried the clear out sales again, then stopped, then found more I had totally forgotten about and have just started another sort out, so for a change I have simple pile of paper notes detailing the boxes in the most ‘high level’ I could do. Not been brave enough to look inside them yet beyond it’s MDF / 28mm fantasy etc but I get the feeling I’ll use the Apple Notes app as then I can sync it to my phone and stop shopping for duplicates!!!

    TBH I’m in two minds how far I downsize. Do I go to a few selections or go right back to a couple of games? It’s going to be an interesting cataloguing exercise.

    #163358
    jeffers
    Participant

    I just shove ‘em in boxes in the loft.

    More nonsense on my blog: http://battle77.blogspot.com/

    #163360
    MartinR
    Participant

    I put my stuff in box files with labels on. I can read the labels to remind me what is inside them. I did make a start cataloguing everything for insurance purposes, but in the end decided that life is too short.

    If the house burns down, I’ll just start again.

     

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #163362
    ian pillay
    Participant

    Here’s my management system. It ain’t fancy but practical……

     

    Tally-Ho!

    #163363
    vexillia
    Participant

    I’d be interested in trying a copy of this system. Nice to see someone using Linux! How do we get in touch? I have a contact form on my blog.

    Martin Stephenson :: Work | Blog | Auctions

    #163364
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    I only keep track of my painted miniatures, and I use a simple spreadsheet. But in practice, I rarely use it, except when I add new entries. All my painted figures (a few 1000s) are in labeled drawers, and that works fine when I need figures to set up games and putting them back.

    The main function of my spreadsheet is to list for most figures who the manufacturer is and/or where I bought them.

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #163365

    Hmmm… it looks like I’m fairly unique in going to such lengths to track figures and gaming supplies. I guess the packing and unpacking from various household moves prompted me to document everything–especially when so much of my stuff spent a year in a storage unit rather than at home. I used to get so frustrated knowing I had something but not knowing where to find it!

    In reality, it’s not much work to keep the system up to date these days. I even programmed the system to print drawer labels so each storage drawer has a tag with its identity number and a listing of what it contains.

    –jeff

     

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #163366

    @Martin, I’ll get in touch via your blog.

    –jeff

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #163367
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    I guess using something more elaborate also depends on how cumbersome it is to access your physical collection.

    I have a seperate wargaming room with neatly organized drawers under the gaming table for easy access for all my painted miniatures. If your collection is stored in a pile of oddly-shaped shoeboxes, plastic containers, all stacked multiple layers deep in your garden shed – then yes, I can see you need something so you can plan the digging expedition.

    I always felt it is more useful to spend time and money on good and practical physical storage, rather than spend time and money on building a (software) management system on top of an unorganized heap of junk. YMMV. 😉

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #163368
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    Sometimes I’ve seen people tracking monetary value as well, but I don’t understand the use of that. The value of a wargaming collection is (apart from some collector’s items) mostly a delusional thing. The real value is the time you’ve put in, and no matter whatbhappens, you’ll never get that back.

    I know that some do it for insurance purposes, but I just use a lump sum for everything that’s in the house and pay insurance for that. Country-specific insurance practices might dictate otherwise, of course.

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #163369

    Well, that’s the flip side of the coin, Phil. I already had the skill set to build the system and the type of problem I like to solve. So building ‘Muster’ was as much a hobby project as painting figures.

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #163370
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    Well, that’s the flip side of the coin, Phil. I already had the skill set to build the system and the type of problem I like to solve. So building ‘Muster’ was as much a hobby project as painting figures.

    So your real hobby is managing a wargaming collection instead of actual wargaming. 🙂🙂

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #163371

    So your real hobby is managing a wargaming collection instead of actual wargaming. 🙂🙂

    Well, I think of them as parallel hobbies 😉

    ‘Playing’ has always been a rarity for me. I buy figures, paint and plan. Buy rules, read and plan. Write rules, test and plan. Make terrain, lay it out, put it away.

    Familiar with Myers-Briggs personality types? I’m an INTP. We like to plan. Execute? Not so much.

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #163372
    deephorse
    Participant

    This is how I organise my 20mm WWII collection.

    Figures are in various compartmented boxes.  Vehicles, tanks, artillery etc., are in the box files with labels on.  Bulky terrain items, hills, buildings, trees etc., are in larger Really Useful boxes.  I find that the combination of memory and some labels is sufficient for my needs.

    On the other hand I had to resort to software for my books.  I have a lot of books.  So many, in fact, that they are split between two houses.  My collection of Ospreys alone is at 800+ at present.  And that was the problem.  Hardbacks, I can remember.  Ospreys, for some reason, I can’t.  Maybe it’s because some titles are so similar (Germany’s Eastern Front Allies nos. 1 to 657!), or because they release the same book with a different cover?  I’ve even had the same cover but with a different book inside it!

    Anyway, after buying the same Osprey for the third time I decided that I needed some kind of list that I could take to shows to stop me making this mistake over and over.  I discovered that I had an old Microsoft database program which fitted the bill perfectly.  So I entered every Osprey into the database, discovered yet more duplicates, and ended up with something akin to a phone book in size to carry around the shows.  Not very practical.

    So I’m back to relying upon memory regarding Ospreys when I visit shows, but because it’s been two years since I last went to one, it’s not been an issue.  Fortunately Amazon tells me if and when I last bought any title from them, so that eliminates duplicates from that source.

    Play is what makes life bearable - Michael Rosen

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