Home Forums WWII Deliberate(?) mistake

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  • #54168
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    This is one of my son’s birthday presents. We haven’t opened it yet. I have no idea what we’ll find inside.

    Military history author
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    #54170
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Dissapointment I will wager.

    #54182
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    Mike, I doubt my son will be disappointed, whatever is inside.

    Tim, I hadn’t thought of that. I’ll let you know if there are any 🙂

    Military history author
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    #54183
    DM
    Participant

    Probably a Sherman 🙂

    #54300
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    This is what we found:

    As an aside, the kits are described as “snap together” but require screws. The supplied screwdriver is tiny, and a real pain to use.

    Military history author
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    #54303
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    I don’t think it’s to scale, but I think it is recognisably a T-34.

    Military history author
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    #54312
    Norm S
    Participant

    It is the T34 model J, an experimental model in 1941 and produced in large numbers after being introduced in March 1942. The unique features are that it was a shortened version of the C / D models and to make that happen, it didn’t have an engine.

    The crew were reduced to three which made pedalling all the more difficult with a top speed of less that 9 yards an hour.

    It retains the classic 76/41 barrelled gun, though ammo, due to space limitations was swapped out for 45mm shells. These had to be wrapped tighly with newspaper to get a proper fit in the barrel and unfortunately there were more accidents than knock out hits.

    Although abandoned by mid 1942, as an impractical solution to the fast tactics of the panzer formations, it was to later provide the inspiration of some western vehicle designs, most noteable the front hull for the Sherman and the transmission / track of the M24 Chaffee – though obviously with mechanical drive!

    Look forward to seeing other models in the series, hopefully the Tiger J, which as an experimental unit, directly influenced tank design for two generations and can clearly be seen in the lines of the Abrams.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 9 months ago by Norm S.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 9 months ago by Norm S.
    #54315
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    The crew were reduced to three which made pedalling all the more difficult with a top speed of less that 9 yards an hour.

    The model has a pull-back-and-release friction motor. I’ve now got an image in my head of T-34 crews pushing their tanks backwards, then scrambling to jump in as the tank shot forwards 🙂

    Military history author
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    #54316
    Mike
    Keymaster

    LOLZ

    #54332
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    You know… I kind of like it. It’s cute. It’s an aesthetic of its own. Reminds me of the chibi-style way tanks are depicted in some old 2D Japanese tactical video games.

    But also, LOLZ 

    #54351
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    I wonder if it would be the right size for my cuties…

    #54352
    Jerboa
    Participant

    It is the T34 model J, an experimental model in 1941 and produced in large numbers after being introduced in March 1942. The unique features are that it was a shortened version of the C / D models and to make that happen, it didn’t have an engine. 

    Though I recognize that your knowledge on this most obscure variant is impressive, on the model I have to point out that the return roller is too wide for this type and that it is missing one 1/4 circle rivet on the left rear.  Disappointing.

     

    http://dnir.net/JerboaNet/Jindex.htm

    #54353
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    Victoria, the T-34 is about 50mm long and 40mm tall. It (and the other vehicles in the box – there are eight in total) do seem like they’d fit in well with your figures, if they’re about the right size.

    Military history author
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    #54354
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Victoria D:

    I wonder if it would be the right size for my cuties…

    That’s funny because that’s exactly what I thought when Russell P. posted the picture. That and how cool it would be if Sumerians had sawed-off T-34’s to fight the Guti and Zagros highlanders. Keep up the great work and maybe we’ll see cutie-Valentine tanks in support Old Kingdom Elamites?

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

     

    #54364
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    These look to be the same tanks, but the price seems too good to be true.

    http://www.partystuff4u.co.uk/node/1038

    20 ordered, lets see what they send me 🙂

    #54367
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    They do look like the same ones. The pack my son got has those four, plus some other vehicles. Having seen them, I don’t think I’d want to pay any more than 45p per tank 🙂

    The “W-12” is some sort of self-propelled AA vehicle, might be their representation of a Gepard.

    Military history author
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    #54369
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    Well, I used the word ‘crazy’ in my blog for a reason, I’ve now ordered the 8 pack with the other vehicles in it to see what they are like lol

    I can think of 3 uses for these:

    1. As the vehicles they are meant to be, cutie style.

    2. Parts for making my own unique sci-fi AFVs. Four tanks without turrets could be the track units of an Ogre style super tank, for example.

    3. The basis of a mechanised cutie Sumerian empire as Rob suggested, which I find ridiculously tempting.

    And even if none of that works out I’ve bought myself a week or two of dreaming that it might. 🙂

    #54415
    McKinstry
    Participant

    A mechanized Cutie Sumerian Empire? Oh PLEASE make that happen!

    The tree of Life is self pruning.

    #54667
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    I received the 8 pack of vehicles today, I’m ridiculously pleased with them. 🙂

    The QT34 🙂

    #54670
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Victoria D:

    Go on! Give us a piccie of some cutie T-34’s in support of Sumerian battle-wagons and spear units. The SUUUR (Sumerian Union of Uruk and Umma Regions) has been born! Stop the Elamite panzers and the Gutian M-13/40’s! Long live Queen Kababa, the tavern queen! Defend the Ur-mat! All of this should be in cuneiform but it’s not on the font family options.

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    Happy New Years to all!

    #54671
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    Those remind me of the sadly-neglected (and now, seemingly unavailable) Clankers from Flytrap Factory via Zombiesmith Games.  Although I’m informed that the Flytrap-Zombiesmith partnership is now nixed, and that FTF is promising support in the New Year, I remain skeptical…

    I hope to see more of this work, Victoria!  You have a great style and aesthetic sense for these!

    #54675
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    So, when I get this painted up as a wooden Sumerian tank, do I post about it under Ancients, Imaginations, Fantasy or here cause it’s a T34? lol

    #54676
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    So, when I get this painted up as a wooden Sumerian tank, do I post about it under Ancients, Imaginations, Fantasy or here cause it’s a T34? lol

    I believe that should be a wattle-and-daub tank, actually. Wooden tanks didn’t come along until the Assyrian empire, and even then reed and clay remained in use for the rear armour 

    #54679
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Victoria D:

    Wooden, no. Wooden framed but covered by copper or bronze sheeting! The command tank with Ivory, gold and silver decoration, lapis lazuli detailing and a commander’s parasol. This after all the transition between the Copper Age and the Bronze Age! It’s a Sumerian T-34 force after all.

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #54686
    Etranger
    Participant

    3. The basis of a mechanised cutie Sumerian empire as Rob suggested, which I find ridiculously tempting.

    I like your way of thinking!

    #54687
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Victoria D: Wooden, no. Wooden framed but covered by copper or bronze sheeting!

    You’re a fantasist, sir! Why, every military historian of merit knows Sumerian tanks were armoured with hardened cowhides at best!

    #54689
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant

    It’s wooden framed with cowhide armour, the cowhide dyed or painted, the wood left plain. Armament is an early type of ballista located in the turret. It has a crew of 4 (Gunner/Commander, Driver, 2 Crankers). The tracks run off a flywheel which is powered by hand cranks. Each crew position has a hand crank to allow the Commander and Driver to help power the flywheel during breaks in the action. In addition the Crankers have hatches at their feet which can be opened to allow them to push the tank over particularly difficult ground.

    If you want to see bright polished metal on the tank model you need to wait for the mid 19th century steam powered version. 🙂

    #54741
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant
    #54742
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Victoria D:

    A fitting send off for 2016. I laughed quite hard as I perused the cutie tank commanded by the noble Hammintanki of the Gilded Helm. The foes of the Ur-Cuties will flee in terror at this devastating war machine. This is the biggest breakthrough since ziggurats and irrigation! Happy 2017!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    An appreciative Rod Robertson (AKA Hammuneggi).

    #54759
    Norm S
    Participant

    Forward My Cuties’ – and so it was that the Cuties, hex by hex, hauled themselves to victory. In the final push, their esteemed commander ordered the Crankers to drop hatches and ‘give it some leg power’ and in a scene reminiscent of the Ant Hill Mob dashing for the finishing line in Wacky Races, the lumbering and beloved machine pressed on, inspiring all that followed on foot and striking fear in the hearts of their enemy.

    With shouts of Hoorah and Happy New Year, the cuties rounded up their defeated foe and honoured them by having them join their celebratory roast dinner on make-shift picnic tables made from upturned shields. Hammuneggi was treated to an extra portion and bestowed with the title Duke of EggiDippySoldiers and all was well as 2016 gasped it’s last and gave way to thoughts of new resolutions, hopes and aspirations.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 8 months ago by Norm S.
    #54784
    Victoria Dickson
    Participant
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