Home Forums General General Do you shoot further from battlements?

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  • #193104
    Avatar photoAndrew Beasley
    Participant

    Interesting use of a 140lb longbow to test this.

    Real interesting bits are how tired a skilled archer becomes (slower than I thought) and how many arrows where shot in the siege.

    #193124
    Avatar photoDarkest Star Games
    Participant

    140lbs is a pretty hefty bow,  I shot a few when I was (much) younger and it ain’t easy, especially the pace he set.  I do wonder about the posture though, back arched like that is a sure way to strain, I’ve done it!

    I get Todd’s reasoning, but I didn’t think there was really doubt that the arrows would go farther.  There are accounts of troops on hills outranging their foes below them, quite an advantage to have.

    Didn’t Todd do a short vid of historical archers shooting from the right side (outside) rather than how we do it modern ways with the arrow set on the left (inside) of the bow?

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #193128
    Avatar photoAndrew Beasley
    Participant

    …I do wonder about the posture though, back arched like that is a sure way to strain, I’ve done it!…

    If you watch the back movement towards the end you can see it beginning to hurt and the forced stretch to try and put it back. I’ve shot an 80lb for a handful of arrows with rest and that hurt after a more ‘normal’ bow – last 3 inches are the killer!

    ..Didn’t Todd do a short vid of historical archers shooting from the right side (outside) rather than how we do it modern ways with the arrow set on the left (inside) of the bow?

    Could not find this but there are so many video with titles that do not give you a clue (‘Who would use the instant Legolas’ being my favourite) its possible! I know I’ve seen archers use that in field archery as they claimed it helped the arrows stay with the rest as the bow is drawn at a tilt but as I’ve only tried that type of archery once I cannot vouch for the result 🙂

    #193135
    Avatar photogreg954
    Participant

    Wow, 140lbs long bow is brutal, tried one once. Can’t remember the draw weight it was less l think but it was really hard. At the time I had a 250lbs hunting crossbow. I had to lay on my back using all the length of my body and strength to cock it. The trigger was so heavy I could hardly pull it.

    #193137
    Avatar photoMike
    Keymaster

    Tod has another longbow video?
    He must have Joe with him!!

    #193156

    140lbs is a pretty hefty bow, I shot a few when I was (much) younger and it ain’t easy, especially the pace he set. I do wonder about the posture though, back arched like that is a sure way to strain, I’ve done it! I get Todd’s reasoning, but I didn’t think there was really doubt that the arrows would go farther. There are accounts of troops on hills outranging their foes below them, quite an advantage to have. Didn’t Todd do a short vid of historical archers shooting from the right side (outside) rather than how we do it modern ways with the arrow set on the left (inside) of the bow?

     

    I don’t think the correct answer is that they travel further horizontally when shooting downward than they would on level ground, but that when shooting up at a target on higher elevation they can’t range as far.  The effects of gravity versus the impetus of the bow means that a shot fired from on high might have enough time to let all the impetus horizontally to be exhausted and end up with an arrow that is now plunging almost vertically, but you have to be really, really high to make a difference.

     

    The g forces applied during the during time of flight of an arrow (which is what at most? 2-3 seconds?) is going to be pretty much the same).  Galileo pointed out that a dropped cannonball hits the ground at the same time as as a level shot from a cannon at the same height.  even firing from a 30 foot battlement is not enough height to give a weapon much horizontal advantage over a shot from below.  It’s the shot up that must counter gravity that loses it. arcing the shot doesn’t give any advantage.

    Mick Hayman
    Margate and New Orleans

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