Home Forums Ancients Fit out a ship with twenty oars, the best,…

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  • #167425
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    …and go and find out about your long-lost father.

    The Odyssey; book I, Homer, trans. Emily Wilson.

     

    Here I offer my completed Mycenaean galley, made and sold by Magister Militum, but with a few changes. The model was a present at Christmas 2020, and I finally completed it on Boxing Day 2021, a day outside my one-year target. I can live with that!

    The model was very difficult to put together, and I ended up making some significant modifications and leaving off some unnecessary components.

    The most obvious change is the crew. The originals had ridiculously huge oars, and were armoured in the Mycenaean style, whereas I want to be able to use it for my Biblicals as well as the Odyssey, so the new crew were recruited from Essex, with their integral seats removed with a razor saw. They were then drilled ‘where the sun don’t shine’, and magnets inserted, allowing them to attract to the epoxy and iron powder mix used to fill holes I had drilled in the benches.

    The steersmen’s platforms were constructed towards the stern, rather than the pointy end as intended, and an additional pair of rowers’ benches were added at the front. The steersmen are also from Essex. The oars are etched brass from Caldercraft, to each of which I soldered a short length of brass tube, allowing the oar to be located on a thole pin made from a brass pin fixed into the gunwale.

    Painting, at various stages of construction, was from (mostly) Vallejo paints and washes. Ropes and rigging are from hemp, cotton and linen thread, darkened and dirtied with Vallejo sepia wash. The base is from Fluid 3D.

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #167429
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Nice work, you do good stuff.

    #167430
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Thank you. I try!

    Polyphemus and his fellow cyclopes next – briefly distracted from the Bible by Homer…

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #167431
    Jim Webster
    Participant

    A lovely piece of work

    Genuine craftsmanship

    https://jimssfnovelsandwargamerules.wordpress.com/

    #167465
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Lovely job on that, Geof! Straight out of the frescoes.

    “The steersmen’s platforms were constructed towards the stern, rather than the pointy end as intended, and an additional pair of rowers’ benches were added at the front”

    Lots of people seem to be confused, by the lion sternwork and the “Y-shaped” attachment at the back, into thinking they are seeing a figurehead and a ram. Last I looked speculation was rife as to what purpose the attachment served. An aid to steering or beaching seemed the front runners.

    I notice the crew are rowing rather than paddling. Most of the frescoes that I can recall seem to show ships being paddled. I can only recall one that is obviously being rowed. Was that a personal choice or forced on you by what figures were available?

    Whatever, beautiful piece of work.

    I wish someone made some 1/1200, or even 1/2400, scale Minoan ships. Bit of a niche market I guess, oh well.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    #167468
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Thanks, gents!

    Mike, I was led to believe (‘though I’m not sure by whom) that the stern device was to keep the ship pointing into the waves in high seas, and so reduce the likelihood of capsizing. In any case, it belongs at the back!

    As for the rowers, I looked at the Akrotiri procession fresco (OK, a picture of it!) where the ships seem to have people facing in all directions, and it’s far from clear whether they are rowers, paddlers or passengers. The one ship where it is clear is this one…

    …which is definitely being rowed. Also the only paddlers I could find are kneeling!

    I wish someone made some 1/1200, or even 1/2400, scale Minoan ships.

    1000 black ships before Troy…

    My wife is called Helen, so I must be very, very careful, ‘though she’s more into Corrie than the classics.

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #167472
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Great minds, Geof. That’s the very ship I was thinking of!

    Most of the others have lines of paddlers leaning over the side and passengers under canopies on deck. The passengers are larger and are in pairs facing each other.

    1000 black ships before Troy… Yes, please 🙂

    A friend, whose wife was also called Helen, once leaned across a restaurant table and, in an effort at being romantic, said, “Was this the face that launch’d a thousand ships, And burnt the topless towers of Ilium? Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss.”

    And she said,”Are you saying I have a face like a champagne bottle?”

    Some people can’t take a compliment. 🙂

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    #167536
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    Geez Mike, ya just made me spit my drink all over my desk!  That’s hilarious, guess she needed a bit deeper of a dive into classics!  Or perhaps she’s just the right amount of goofy.

    Lovely ship, now you need another one to battle against.

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #167537
    Jim Webster
    Participant

    I told my lady wife about the champagne bottle comment and she laughed as well 🙂

    https://jimssfnovelsandwargamerules.wordpress.com/

    #167538
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Absolutely no chance at all of building another of those &*[email protected]£R$! A nightmare. I think we’ll return from Troy, the long way, rather than build another ship, let alone 999!

    The first hull I had was miscast, so they sent me a new one, meaning I have a dodgy hull to build a wreck on the island of the sirens, so The Odyssey rather than the Iliad (‘though I do have a Trojan horse, but that’s nowt to do with Homer in any case!)

     

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

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