Home Forums WWII GHQ Microamor for WWII Eastern Front

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  • #44921
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    I recently read some batreps on Two-Hour Wargames new “Hell Hath No Fury” rules. I liked what I saw so I picked them up, and the boy and I playtested a few quick scenarios last week. We liked it so much I decided it’s time for another campaign; I sent off for some GHQ Microarmor last Sunday, received them Friday, and spent all Saturday painting them up. My plan is for us to follow a German Panzer Platoon (of four tanks; I’ll control two, the boy will control the other two) from Barbarossa all the way to the end of the war. I was doing some research on German Panzer Divisions, but in the end I think I’ll just make one up so that I can make sure the platoon is in all the places I want it to be, unconstrained by what happened in real life. The closest was 20th Panzer Division, but then I found out they started Barbarossa with Pz 38ts, and I just plunked for Pz IIIs…

    In any case, I purchased the little bit I need for the Germans and a whole bunch of Soviets. Please understand that Hell Hath No Fury is meant to be purely a tank vs tank game, but I can’t really bring myself to do that, so I bought a bunch of ‘other’ stuff. I bought some halftracks and infantry for the Germans, but they’re purely for looks and story-telling, the Panzer Platoon will be the only ‘players’ on the German side. But for the Soviets a picked up a bucket load of tanks, plus some armored cars, trucks, anti-tank guns, and infantry, and they will be actual players in the games. Sorry, but I wanted to have that level of realism in the games. Though I may do a purely tank on tank at some point, thinking Israelis vs Egyptians/Syrians.


    The whole sha-bang, with Germans at left and Soviets at right. You don’t have to have so many of the opposing force, but I like variety rather than facing the same old enemy force time after time. Each side has twelve infantry, then the Germans have five Pz Mk IIIs and five halftracks, while the Soviets have five Ba-10 armored cars, five T-60s, five T-26s, five BT-5s, five T-34s, five KV-1s, five Studebaker trucks, and six 57mm anti-tank guns.

    To see closeups of each, please check the blog at:
    http://blackhawkhet.blogspot.com/2016/07/ghq-microamor-for-wwii-eastern-front.html

    Alright, there are the opposing forces, stand by for the first batrep. I’ll tell ya that the boy and I faced relatively light resistance and we accomplished our mission. It might seem a bit of a pushover, but there were a few moments in there where I was starting to sweat at it could have gone either way, and I think it was probably fairly in line with the early battles as the Wehrmacht crashed through the Soviet defenses in Poland. More to come.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #44922
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    Looking good but five KV-1’s vs. five Pz III’s is going to be a bit futile, no? No 88’s or 105’s to back you up? The Germans are going to have it rough with them seemly abandoning combined arms warfare. From a Soviet perspective this is excellent news and I applaud your forward thinking comrade! The micro armour looks very good and the teeny-tiny decals turned out surprising well! Bravo on the artistic end of things. And now for the traditional gripe. How, how, how could you substitute Pz III’s for the exquisite and sublime perfection that was the rivet-ridden Pz. 38(t)? How could you do this Jack? You have abjured and denied the most beautiful tank of the early war? I shall never forgive you this calumny. You have cast aside caviar and substituted trail-mix! It is truly barbaric! Zut alors, les Américains sont tellement dégoûtant! Coulée perles devant les pourceaux. 

    Cheers and good gaming.

    A broken-hearted Rod Robertson pining for a micro-Skoda fix.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 7 months ago by Rod Robertson.
    #44924
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Look’s good but I’m with Rod….you will need some arty and 88’s to take on KV-1’s !!!!

    #44925
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Rod,

    1.  Don’t worry, there will never be five KV-1s on the table; I’m thinking there will never be more than two, and I possibly may limit them to one KV-1 or T-34, which I’ll explain a bit more…

    2.  The Germans haven’t abandoned combined arms warfare, nor artillery and anti-tank guns; please remember that “Hell Hath No Fury” is actually a pure tank vs tank game.  The only reason halftracks, trucks, infantry, guns, and armored cars are present is because I added them in myself because I wanted an experience more in line with what I’ve read in the Panzer Aces books, which is more than simply tank vs tank combat.

    Furthermore, this campaign will be following a single German platoon of four tanks, two commanded by me and two by my son, through the entire war on the Eastern Front.  Another part of adding enemy infantry, trucks, and armored cars in was that it should make the missions a bit easier to accomplish, which may be cheating a bit, but remember that I actually want at least my son and I to survive to the end.  This is also the reason I’ll be limiting the number of Soviet monsters (KV-1s and T-34s in the early war battles when the Germans are still running around in puny tanks) on the table at one time.  I will literally be playing that the German Panzers have to do the following: to take out a T-34 they have to hit it from behind, and to take out a KV-1 they have to get to point blank range and roll 5’s and 6’s on 2D6 (hitting with both) in order to either shoot holes in the KV’s muzzle (disabling the main gun), immobilize it and cause the crew to bail, or just pound the vision blocks, hatches, and rivets until the crew bails.

    3.  Those aren’t decals, I hand painted all the stuff.  I probably should have bought decals 😉

    4.  I used the Panzer III rather than the Panzer 38(t) because I think the Panzer III is cool as hell, and will be using it all the way to the winter of ’42, when the platoon will get upgraded to Pz IVGs right before “Winter Storm.”

    5.  “Zut alors, les Américains sont tellement dégoûtant! Coulée perles devant les pourceaux.”
    And cut it out with all that Canadian, I can’t never understand that stuff 😉

    V/R,
    Jack

    #44926
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Can’t do it John, the game is about four German tanks.

    Im also thinking T-34s should only be 1, 2, maybe even three on the table.  And be prepared for perhaps some boring batreps.  If my four little short 50mm-armed tanks come up against 2 or 3 T-34s, and they knock out one of our tanks and it doesn’t look like we can get around behind them, we’re pulling back (off table) to let air and arty do their thing.

    There will be no fights to the death, we’re trying to survive this war!

    V/R,

    Jack

    #44927
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    OK……

    #44928
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    “If my four little short 50mm-armed tanks come up against 2 or 3 T-34s, and they knock out one of our tanks and it doesn’t look like we can get around behind them, we’re pulling back (off table) to let air and arty do their thing.”

    What happens if the Soviets don’t let you withdraw but pursue your withdrawal with their much faster T-34’s? They might not let you withdraw!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 7 months ago by Rod Robertson.
    #44957
    Just Jack
    Participant

    “What happens if the Soviets don’t let you withdraw but pursue your withdrawal with their much faster T-34’s? They might not let you withdraw!”

    Well, they won’t do that, because they’re not as mean as you think they are!
    My reading suggests that it’s not that common for forces in a slugging match to chase after a withdrawing enemy force.  Certainly I was an infantryman and not a tanker, but I think (based on reading) that pursuit operations are a higher echelon concept; when a small unit takes a position you look to consolidate (your forces are strung out to hell so you need to reorganize, check ammo, equipment, and personnel, etc…), rather than run off willy-nilly after them.  Not to mention there’s the human aspect of “okay, I won the fight, am I all that keen to haul ass after him and further expose myself, particularly when I only know what’s happening directly in front of me.”  Hell, we may be falling back on the left and right.

    Even at higher echelon, pursuit operations are designed to encircle and cut off, winning by bagging the enemy, not killing him.  The encirclement ops are won by maneuver, not fire, capturing boatloads of enemy troops and equipment.  Certainly fighting on the Eastern Front, even up to the very end, shows this.

    The one case I might grant you is an assault through an enemy position, where the local commander has probably already lost control of his troops as they’ve entered close combat, and as the enemy runs your own troops (tanks) are acting on their own initiative (without orders, or directly in defiance of the commander’s orders trying to reign them in and consolidate) to run down every last enemy soldier and/or vehicle.  In that case, we’ll simply have to fight our way out.

    My overall point was that this is a campaign (and hopefully most of my battles are similar) and the troops want to survive, so these battles won’t be a series of Germans charging in against overwhelming odds, getting tank after tank shot out from under them, taking horrendous casualties, then simply reconstituting prior to the next mission.  We will make attempts at accomplishing the mission while simultaneously preserving our force for future operations, and in those cases where we believe we cannot accomplish the mission we will fall back and live to fight another day.

    V/R,
    Jack

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