Home Forums Air and Sea Air Highish Level Bomb Run Dispersal?

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #60728
    Les Hammond
    Participant

    You’ll have to excuse me a bit, I am mostly a land wargamer and thus I am not sure exactly what I mean by ‘highish level’ (I suppose aircraft can be engaged by AA of about 3.7″ or 88mm?) but I was wondering how long a trail of impact craters would be for one aircraft bomb load?

    Lots of variables, I know, even excluding effects weather for instance aircraft speed and time taken to release whole load and indeed how many bombs carried.

    Just need some sort of idea, 1km at ‘high’ level reducing down to 500m at ‘low’ level??

    6mm France 1940

    http://les1940.blogspot.co.uk/
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/386297688467965/

    #60732
    MartinR
    Participant

    It more depends on the intervals the bombs are released at than the altitude. If the Al come out in a clump, they land in a clump. If realised at 2 second intervals, they’ll land in a long line. Altitude will more affect overall accuracy.

    However, based on looking up and down the street, German 250kg bombs from He 111 or Just 88 seem to have landed roughly 8 houses apart, so maybe 100m between individual bombs.

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #60733
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    In WW2 a German bomber, part of a raid on the Forth Rail Bridge apparently, which was being pursued by fighters ditched it’s bomb load so that it hit the other side of the street I used to live in. You can still see the repairs done to the buildings.

    I doubt the line of damage extended more than 100 yards in total.

    I’d agree with MartinR’s “it depends” answer.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    #60736
    MartinR
    Participant

    There is a discussion in Catch 22 about bomb dispersion patterns. The squadron is supposed to be bombing a road so the ops officer has ordered the bomb releases to be set so each plane hits around 400 yards of road, but is overruled by the CO as group like “nice tight bomb patterns” on the photos.

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #60745
    Les Hammond
    Participant

    …based on looking up and down the street, German 250kg bombs from He 111 or Just 88 seem to have landed roughly 8 houses apart, so maybe 100m between individual bombs.

    That’s an interesting benchmark to start from, thanks

    6mm France 1940

    http://les1940.blogspot.co.uk/
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/386297688467965/

    #64992
    John D Salt
    Participant

    Of course “it depends” is a fairly useless answer, but this is a variable that operators can choose for themselves, so (said Mr Micawber with a sudden burst of confidence) it depends on what they choose.

    I observe that a photo on Pinterest and elsewhere of an AN-B3 intervalometer (presumably from a Norden bombsight as it was fitted in B-17s and B-24s) that shows a dial marked “INTERVAL BETWEEN BOMBS = FT” with selectable intervals on the dial apparently between 7 and 750 feet (2.1 and 229 metres in English money). There might just be more markings below 7 obscured by a knob in the picture, but a couple of metres seems close enough for any kind of bomb I can think of. A photo from the Smithsonian showing a “Computer, Bomb Spacing, Navy” which I imagine to be of similar vintage (the maximum airspeed shown is 200 knots) has a dial marked “BOMB SPACING – FT” scaled between 20 and 200 feet (6 and 61 metres).

    What interval is chosen will depend on the extent of the target, the type of bomb being dropped, how many bombs in the stick, and what maths your operational research team have done to try to find the interval giving the highest probability of a hit or the highest expected number of hits.

    All the best,

    John.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.