Home Forums General General How do you represent an occupied building?

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #138193
    Thuseld
    Participant

    As I play largely in 6mm, I don’t have buildings that fit a base of infantry inside. I dislike counters on the table, and can just about handle micro D6s that can sort of blend in with the scenery. Placing a squad of infantry next to the building is too ambiguous for me and messy. What if I want a unit inside and a unit taking cover behind it?

    As such, for my WW2 games, I have just come up with this:

    I feel like this is a good, sort of immersive method of demonstrating that a building is occupied. I will then have to remember which unit is inside though. However, it does feel a little computer-gamey.

    #138194
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    For most games I have a set of boxes drawn on a piece/s of paper off table, with numbers or description of the buildings on table on them.

    A unit moves into a building – it disappears from the table and sits in the relevant box until it exits or dies.

    Yes people forget they are there – attackers suddenly get shot to pieces from what they had assumed was an unoccupied farm complex or defenders don’t shoot at troops outside they could have.

    Two things I regard as  a bonus not a problem.

    Declutters the table and you add a small layer of fog of war.

    But if you want people to know at a glance; your system certainly does a good job.

    #138201
    Ruarigh
    Participant

    The flags look like a good way of showing the building is occupied. I use flags to show which objectives are controlled by which side in my games. For buildings, I have used two techniques for my Command Decision games. The simplest one is that all my buildings are on bases/templates representing the whole built up area and figures are just placed on the base to show that it is occupied. Where a built-up area template is large enough to have multiple zones, the figures are placed in roughly the right area for each zone. The other one is to have a template with the building floorplan or zones of occupation marked on it. The buildings are removed from the template when they are occupied and the figures placed on the template. The building goes back on the template when it is unoccupied. Both work well enough. I prefer the former method because it does not have the same negative aesthetic impact that the latter has. It helps that I started using Brigade Models 3mm (or whatever it is) buildings for my 6mm games so the buildings are not too large and there is more room on the BUA bases.

    Never argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    https://emidsvikings.ac.uk/
    https://roderickdale.co.uk/

    #138203
    Thuseld
    Participant

    For most games I have a set of boxes drawn on a piece/s of paper off table, with numbers or description of the buildings on table on them. A unit moves into a building – it disappears from the table and sits in the relevant box until it exits or dies. Yes people forget they are there – attackers suddenly get shot to pieces from what they had assumed was an unoccupied farm complex or defenders don’t shoot at troops outside they could have. Two things I regard as a bonus not a problem. Declutters the table and you add a small layer of fog of war. But if you want people to know at a glance; your system certainly does a good job.

    I like the idea of your fog of war element and can see a benefit to that. I play mostly solo so I know anyway where each unit is, unless I specifically plan for some hidden deployment/surprise deployment in a specific scenario.

    #138207
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    I still do it when playing solo.

    And yes I do forget they are there sometimes!

    I have quite a bit of ‘fog of war’ built into my brain at the best of times.

    Your flags have a very familiar aesthetic to them –  works really well if you play a lot of computer games. I’d probably opt to use the flags as flat counters myself, but principally because I’d end up knocking them over/around in play.

    Nice idea.

    #138210
    Thuseld
    Participant

    I still do it when playing solo. And yes I do forget they are there sometimes! I have quite a bit of ‘fog of war’ built into my brain at the best of times. Your flags have a very familiar aesthetic to them – works really well if you play a lot of computer games. I’d probably opt to use the flags as flat counters myself, but principally because I’d end up knocking them over/around in play. Nice idea.

    Wait and see, I will probably forget I have them and never use them. Also, I am probably on some kind of list for downloading images of Swastikas, so I may suddenly disappear.

    #138214
    MartinR
    Participant

    I just stand the figures on/next to the building.

    back in old WRG days the bases were small enough to physically put the figures inside.

    If using hidden deployment we mark it on a map.

     

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #138253
    deephorse
    Participant

    I don’t play in 6mm so I have no answer for that scale.  In 20mm we just put the figures inside the building.  If the roofs don’t come off then the figures just line the outside walls and you tell the other players what that represents.  I don’t see the flags as being any different to a counter, they are still on-table markers.  How can you like one and not the other?  If anything the flags are more jarring to the eye, unless that is the effect you are after.

    Trust science, not the scientists.

    #138261
    Thuseld
    Participant

    I don’t play in 6mm so I have no answer for that scale. In 20mm we just put the figures inside the building. If the roofs don’t come off then the figures just line the outside walls and you tell the other players what that represents. I don’t see the flags as being any different to a counter, they are still on-table markers. How can you like one and not the other? If anything the flags are more jarring to the eye, unless that is the effect you are after.

    I see where you are coming from about the flags basically being counters. Something about it though just feels different to me than having a tiddlywink with an allied star lying down next to the building. I mean it is entirely subjective isn’t it. My eye isn’t as jarred as it as by other on table markers.

    #138348
    Andrew Beasley
    Participant

    For skirmish games I often had larger scale floor plans allowing figures to be moved around the rooms as required but this can eat table space like no other game addition (except pizza).

    The main issues I see are ‘zone of control’ or line of sight when you just use any marker – both important for modern day / sci-fi games more than fantasy and something I’ve only solved by having a simple plain base the same size as the building that can be swapped in and out as needed.  Even this though has its issues where the building is more than one story as I dislike the flight stand / upturned glass / multi-legged stand arrangements…

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.