Home Forums Terrain and Scenery Jungle Terrain and Tutorial Video on my Blog

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  • #129714
    AbwehrschlachtAbwehrschlacht
    Participant

    Here’s my new blog with some new Jungle terrain and a video showing you how I made it! I hope you enjoy them both!

    https://www.stormofsteelwargaming.com/2020/01/welcome-to-jungle.html

    http://www.stormofsteelwargaming.com

    #129725
    telzy ambertelzy amber
    Participant

    Very good.

    I meant to leave a comment on your blog but google ate it.

    Excellent tutorial with step by step visual work.

    I do have two questions. Why do you use the small pieces as impassible terrain?

    On the larger coconut tree pieces it does not appear that your infantry can occupy the terrain piece. They are very scenic, lovely bits. Thank you for the excellent how to video.

    #129733
    AbwehrschlachtAbwehrschlacht
    Participant

    Cheers buddy! I’m glad you liked the blog and the video!

    Two answers: I will just use the smaller pieces as blocking terrain pieces, to funnel movement around the board and create cover really. There’s no reason why they can’t also be passable, but I will define them depending on the scenario.

    No the infantry can’t occupy the larger pieces. Some parts of the jungle are impenetrable and this is what these are representing, again to block areas and create cover on the board. I was going to make some pieces with removable trees, so that you can fit figures in amongst the foliage, but that is something for future.

     

    http://www.stormofsteelwargaming.com

    #129771
    Gaz045
    Participant

    Cool video and very timely- my winter project is to knock out some CD jungles! Great tips and pitfall avoidance too, thanks for the gen!

    "Even dry tree bark is not bitter to the hungry squirrel"

    #129772
    AbwehrschlachtAbwehrschlacht
    Participant

    Cheers buddy! I’m glad you liked it, I hope it is of some help to you.

    http://www.stormofsteelwargaming.com

    #129783
    Thomaston
    Participant

    Thanks for teh guide. I really like the brown wash on teh aquarium plants to dull them down. I’ve been avoiding using aquarium plants because they were too bright and shiny, will have to try your method now.

    Tired is enough.

    #129801
    AbwehrschlachtAbwehrschlacht
    Participant

    Cheers Thomaston, yes, those plants are VERY green. I’ve seen a lot of people using them as is, but I preferred a subtler look to mine. I hope it works out for you.

    http://www.stormofsteelwargaming.com

    #130017
    Cacique CaribeCacique Caribe
    Participant

    The use of rubberized horsehair to recreate the thick vines and brambles is also something I’ve been struggling with for some time.  Fortunately I was able to find a US source for the material:

    https://www.onlinefabricstore.net/1-x-24-rubberized-hair-.htm?turntosku=185350&turntoEmailType=reviewSolicitation&turntosuid=SEcHa0Ae&transId=364909&reviewStartAction=rateIt&starSelected=0&turntoflow=review#turntodone

     

    Dan
    Loads of WIPs: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/with/72157710630529376

    #130019
    RhodericRhoderic
    Participant

    The use of rubberized horsehair to recreate the thick vines and brambles is also something I’ve been struggling with for some time. Fortunately I was able to find a US source for the material

    In case anyone is having difficulty sourcing rubberised horsehair, or doesn’t want to use animal products, coir (coconut “hair”) is a good substitute and easier to source. There’s a good chance you’ll find it in gardening centers in the form of liners for outdoor hanging baskets (the kind meant for potted plants). That said, depending on where you live they may only carry them for parts of the year (where I live there’s not much call for them in winter, so they don’t carry them at that time of year).

    I have both coir basket liner and rubberised horsehair, and I find them to be quite interchangeable. The rubberised horsehair is more airy and “bouncy” thanks to the latex, but the latex also adds specks of white that, to my eye, detract somewhat from the appearance of vegetation unless it’s painted over or covered with flock. Un-rubberised coir comes packed denser so you have to tease out the fibers a bit, and maybe hit it with a PVA “wash” afterward to make it sturdier like rubberised horsehair, but this is easy.

    For that matter, I’ve heard that some manufacturers of rubberised “horsehair” have switched over to making the product with coir instead, though they may still call it horsehair out of conventionality. The fibers are functionally the same for all intents and purposes. I could try making my own rubberised coir by dipping bits of basket liner in latex (which I also have left over from some amateur mouldmaking experiments), but I don’t really have a reason to.

    #130071
    Cacique CaribeCacique Caribe
    Participant

    “For that matter, I’ve heard that some manufacturers of rubberised ‘horsehair’ have switched over to making the product with coir instead, though they may still call it horsehair out of conventionality. The fibers are functionally the same for all intents and purposes. I could try making my own rubberised coir by dipping bits of basket liner in latex (which I also have left over from some amateur mouldmaking experiments), but I don’t really have a reason to.”

    The blue “horsehair” in my link is much thinner (most of it truly hair-like) than any of the coco fibers I’ve seen in my neck of the woods, which means that the blue “horsehair” works best for 15mm vegetation.

    Here is a Flickr folder of mangrove “trees” and a folder of acacia trees, both for 15mm gaming.  Click on each to see their accompanying images:

    A8888510-EACB-4AE9-AA49-B1BF950E88DB

    0C67BA55-A4F9-47B2-9AB7-0FA6AF68F7EE

    I do like your idea of using a PVA “wash” to strengthen a weave in a clump of coir, if I ever find the need to use those thicker fibers.

    Dan
    Loads of WIPs: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/with/72157710630529376

    #130074
    RhodericRhoderic
    Participant

    The blue “horsehair” in my link is much thinner (most of it truly hair-like) than any of the coco fibers I’ve seen in my neck of the woods, which means that the blue “horsehair” works best for 15mm vegetation.

    Sorry, I didn’t realise that the material you were talking about was, itself, a substitute for horsehair, rather than actual horsehair. I did wonder why it looked to be a different colour than I’m used to in the pictures. In my experience, real horsehair strands are quite thick and coarse, like coir.

    I might look into sourcing some of that blue material, then. I do have, in my stash of terrain-making materials, a type of synthetic strands that are black-blue and thinner than horsehair or coir, so it may be the same stuff, only not in “rubberised” form (meaning dipped in latex and shaped into airy bricks with some “bounce” to them).

     

    #130122
    Cacique CaribeCacique Caribe
    Participant

    You still need to tease out the material, and pull out the odd thick strand here and there.

    446A4103-313D-4E97-8794-A18906D39197

    A1AF4F81-B254-4A4B-ABA3-2207589CF11C

    As I’ve discovered through trial and error, the more you tease it out and thin out the weave before applying to the tree armature the better.

    Same goes for the foliage/flock. You need to be able to see some of the “branches” through parts of the foliage.  In other words, less is more.

    AFE5EE8A-6ADC-4BAA-A494-9E85ECAD0E2F

    Dan
    Loads of WIPs: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/with/72157710630529376

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