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  • #173138
    vtsaogames
    Participant

    I’m considering a game based on the 1779 non-action in the Penobscot Bay, assuming the Americans actually decided to attack before the British reinforcements showed up.

    Biggest ship would be the Continental frigate Warren, 32 guns. Then sloops, a brig and a raft of smaller privateers. Any suggestions for who makes these? The smaller, the better. I can jury rig the fort.

    It's never too late to have a happy childhood

    #173140
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I’ll look forward to seeing them.

    #173442
    AdmiralHawke
    Participant

    Few if any manufacturers seem to have focused on the American War of Independence, which always strikes me as a pity as it was in many ways a much more interesting and eventful naval war than the Napoleonic Wars (or, indeed, the War of 1812). Most ships from the Napoleonic Wars are largely or entirely correct for the American War of Independence.

    The three mainstream choices are now 1/700, 1/1200 and 1/2400 with the obvious trade off between model detail, price and space. Obviously, you roughly quadruple the sea area for the same table as you go down in scale.

    • 1/700 has become popular because of Warlord Games’s Black Seas. Warlord’s models are generic, with some variation in sterns and figureheads. Perhaps more interestingly, there’s a wide variety of 3D printed models from designers like Henry Turner.
    • 1/1200 is the classic scale. There are four main manufacturers: GHQ, Langton, Navwar and Red Eagle (ex-Skytrex). Opinions vary, but broadly GHQ and Langton are more expensive and higher quality, Red Eagle are cheap but OK, while Navwar are cheap but quite crude. My favourites are GHQ (https://www.ghqmodels.com/collections/1-1200-scale), which offers a number of smaller vessels like frigates, brigs, corvettes, sloops, schooners, and cutters that you will give you most of what need for Penobscot Bay. GHQ mixes fine with Red Eagle (http://redeagleminiatures.co.uk/napoleonic.html), which would be a cheaper option. There’s also a good range of buildings, including forts, from Brigade Models (https://www.brigademodels.co.uk/SmallScaleScenery/index.html).
    • 1/2400 are obviously pretty small, and therefore popular for actions with larger fleets than the Penobscot squadrons. Figurehead makes various smaller ships like brigs, schooners and coastal craft that would suit Penobscot. So does Tumbling Dice.

    There’s a pretty comprehensive listing, with links, here: http://admiralty.ixtraneous.net/shopping.

    You won’t find perfect matches for every ship, but GHQ’s 1/1200 Agamemnon, 64, is perfect for Collier’s Raisonable, which was a sister ship.

    I hope that helps. 😉

    #173450
    vtsaogames
    Participant

    AdmiralHawke, thank you so much for this.

    I have to say that I’m primarily a land gamer. My one previous try at 1/2400 Age of Sail can be seen here. I am thinking of doing the Penobscot expedition in 1/2400 for the following reasons.

    1. I am intimidated by building larger age of sail models. 1/2400 is so much easier, no rigging.

    2. I have limited storage space, most taken up by thousands of 15mm models and terrain.

    3. I am cheap – silly to say after the amount spent on the above.

    4. I think I can put the Penobscot fight on my 6X4 table using actual scale distances, 1 inch = 200 feet. It would be the only time that figure scale would equal ground scale – or in this case, bay scale.

    I have Figurehead ships of the line and a frigate. The main sources on this side of the pond have stocking issues in the smaller sizes. But since you clued me in to Tumbling Dice, I think a combination of the two should get me squared away. Now to read Cornwell’s “The Fort” since he seems to have done a fair bit of research on this, like # guns per ship and weight of guns, etc. Did not know young John Moore was present at this.

    Thank you again.

    It's never too late to have a happy childhood

    #173779
    AdmiralHawke
    Participant

    My pleasure.

    Yes, naval wargaming does not require half as much space as military wargaming.

    I agree with you on rigging. I know I don’t have the patience or talent to rig tiny models, so I don’t rig mine. Here are some of my models for, coincidentally, the exact same month of July 1779: https://www.thewargameswebsite.com/forums/topic/battle-of-grenada-6th-july-1779/.

    Modelling Penobscot Bay will be quite an undertaking. Interesting that Moore was there.

    I look forward to seeing your progress. Good luck.

    #173783
    vtsaogames
    Participant

    I am looking at Andy Callan’s ultra-simple “Warm Work, Hardy!” and converting it to smaller ships. Rather than having larger ships roll more dice, I am thinking of having 32 gun ships cause twice as much damage per hit, and the 64 gun ship thrice as much. Otherwise, with buckets of dice, they will always cause damage. I think they might miss just as much as any ship, but if they hit…

     

    I have found another map, not as nice as the first but it makes much more sense when reading about the actions. Young Moore did well. Can’t say the same for Colonel Paul Revere. Reading “The Fort” at the moment.  What a dog’s dinner. Or on this side of the pond, a cluster ****

    It's never too late to have a happy childhood

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