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  • #65855
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    I guess I also mean a fighting position on the hill not just and OP. sorry I was not clearer.  Good to have Rod back.

    #66002
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    AKA, the fourth and final fight in the Battle of Mar Gush

    It is 0630 on 31 March 1948, and Danny Tzur’s 2nd Platoon is preparing to finish its fight on the northern edge of the village.  Two days ago, 1st Platoon fought the company’s first fight in the War for Independence; Jordanian Army troops advanced on Mar Gush and the Jews were able to deflect it.  Rebuffed, the Arabs returned the next morning, and Danny’s platoon fought them to a standstill, with both sides falling back.  While that was happening, 1st Platoon was manning the roadblock on the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road, east of the village.  They had not received any direct contact from Jordanian infantry, but as of 0630 on 31 March they’d been under intermittent shell fire for about 24 straight hours.  Additionally, yesterday morning, while Danny’s men were fighting on the north side of the village, 3rd Platoon was involved in a desperate fight on the southern side of Mar Gush, barely turning back the Jordanian advance.

    Overnight, Jordanian infantry infiltrated back into the northern end of Mar Gush, and now that morning has arrived, Danny is leading the counterattack to eject the Arabs from the village.


    Overview, north is up.  At center left is Cemetery Hill, and at center right is The Orchard, both the scenes of much bloodletting during the fight yesterday morning.  Strewn across the bottom of the map are various homes and shops on the north side of Mar Gush.  Of particular prominence are: Dor’s house at bottom center left (Dor is the platoon commander fro 3rd Platoon), Giora’s house (far right, just above the road), the Mayor’s office (bottom right), and the Post Office (bottom center right, just right of the fruit stand).

    The Jewish platoon (squad, really) is split into two sections (left, coming up Cemetery Hill, and bottom center left, coming up on Dor’s House).  The Jordanians are spread across the right (east) side of the map: a Bren team on the north bank of the Nelani River (top right), a Bren team on the 2nd floor of the Mayor’s Office (bottom right), two soldiers on the roof of Giora’s House (far right), and three pickets.  One is on the road at top center, one is in The Orchard at center right, and one is on the 2nd floor of the Post Office (bottom center right, right of the fruit stand).


    Danny, Eli, and Davi assault the Post Office.  To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://swordofgideonwargaming.blogspot.com/2017/06/war-for-independence-fight-4.html

    Thus concludes the Battle of Mar Gush.  Total casualties:
    Jews:
    3 men killed in action
    3 men discharged due to permanent injury
    7 men wounded but able to return to duty within 30 days
    2 men wounded but able to return to duty immediately

    Jordanians:
    55 men killed in action
    10 men captured

    A tremendous amount of arms and munitions were also captured, and it was all passed along to other Palmach/Haganah units, not even a single Bren was kept in the company (that’s for you, Kyote).  Avi was quite proud of his lieutenants and his men, they had proven themselves in the crucible of combat.  And while this entire ordeal had begun only as a means to defend their homes, to a man they now understood the task that lay before them, the mission to establish a state of Israel.  So as Avi, Baruch, Danny, and Dor began reorganizing and preparing the company for action to open the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road, no one complained, all moved with a sense of pride and purpose.  The operation apparently already had a name: “Operation Nachshon,” scheduled to begin on 5 April 1948, only days away.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66017
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    I can’t catch a break from ya Jack !!!  So whats next ????

    #66022
    Just Jack
    Participant

    John,

    “I can’t catch a break from ya Jack !!!”
    Whaddaya mean???  What’s wrong with it?

    “So whats next ????”
    This was just the first operation in the War of Independence, still got a long way to go (probably another 16-20 fights).

    It’s a long weekend though, so I’m also hoping to knock out the last four dogfight from Cuba Libre’s “Phantoms Over Havana.”  Once I’m done with that I can look at getting back to USMC in WWII.  But I also have a hankering to finish up Cuba Libre’s “Operation Payback” with SOF using “SOF Warrior” rules, and I’ve also been reading over the old “Ambush Alley” rules, which I could use for Cuba Libre’s “South Leon” campaign.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66023
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Nothing wrong..cough Bren Guns cough….. It was a good ARR and I did enjoy it.  I look forward to more Independence ARR’s and your Jets, but yes please get back to WW2 Marines !!!

    #66029
    Rod RobertsonRod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack and Keyoteblue:

    Many Israelis used bits of British battle dress during the 47-48 War of Independence so a British 8th Army Bren gunner from North Africa or Italy in shorts, shirt and helmet would do fine as a proxy for an early Israeli Bren gunner.

    Now I begin catching up on Jack’s many recent reports from Cuba Libre through Laquered Coffins to the Arab-Israeli skirmishes. It’s no fun being a teacher when the first thing you face on a break is hobby-homework!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #66039
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    Great report as always, two issues though…

    How does a guy on the ground see a target crawling to rally a buddy on a rooftop with a low wall round it?

    And your Jordanian casualty figures, 55 killed and 10 captured.  What happened to the wounded?

    (Really looking forward to the next report, just felt I had to stop being such a fan girl all the time.)

    🙂

    #66042
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Hey Rod and Victoria !!!

    #66047
    Just Jack
    Participant

    John – You already know why I don’t have an LMG for the Jews; I’m not going to buy a pack of troops just to get a single LMG.  I’ll get back to the Marines as soon as I can.

    Rod – See above, plus I don’t want to use an 8th Army Bren Gunner for the Jews as 1) he’d be the only Jew with a helmet, pack, and infantry gear on, and 2) I’m using 8th Army for the Arabs.  You guys can accuse me of being cheap, I’m okay with that.  And it’s not just the money; I can only prep and paint so  many guys at once (you haven’t seen all the Naps and other stuff I’ve been working on).   I’m pretty proud of how prolific I am with painting, playing, and posting, but even I have limits!

    Trust me guys, I’ve spent lots of time looking at the Peter Pig website; the best I’ve come up with is using Peter Pig 14th Army troops and doing some headswaps (US Army M1 helmets into the mix with the British pie-plate and Bush hats).  But then I’d have to order three more sets of troops (riflemen, Stens, and Brens), pay for those plus international shipping, wait a couple/three weeks for them to get here, do the headswaps, paint and base them, and then have seven spare Brens lying around.  I also looked at Early War Brits, US Marines (M1 helmets and trousers in-bloused), and German Afrika Korps, all I could make work with enough time and money.  But I want to play now!

    So, I will reiterate: if someone has a spare light machine gunner (Bren, Chatellerault, MG-34, DP-28) that would match up with my Peter Pig French Partisans, I could work with that, and I’d be mighty obliged…

    And hurry up with the reading!  If you’re finding it too hard being a teacher AND reading my stuff, perhaps it’s time to retire? 😉

    Vicki – How does a guy see?  He’s close and the lip of the roof isn’t that high.  Regarding WIA, I’m not differentiating between KIA and WIA.  If enemy troops were knocked out of the fight they are simply being counted as KIA.  I’m not going to put effort into tracking wounded (and if they were recovered by the Arabs, the Jews, or bled out) enemy troops, it’s pain enough doing friendlies.

    Thanks guys, I appreciate ya!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66526
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    AKA, the first fight in Operation Nachshon

    It is 0630 on 6 April 1948, and the company is going into action as part of Operation Nachshon, the Jewish operation to open the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road in order to bring relief to the Jewish community in Jerusalem.  While the men of the company were fighting to defend their homes in the village of Mar Gush, west of Jerusalem, Arab Liberation Army forces under Abd Al-Qadr Al-Husayni completed their encirclement of Jerusalem.  A convoy bound for the Jewish Quarter (in Jerusalem) was ambushed on 31 March 1948, forced back with the loss of five vehicles and seventeen dead.  Plans were made to mount as much offensive power as possible in order to re-open the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road; the company, now more or less formally recognized as part of the Haganah (Jewish military), was included in those plans.

    It is now 6 April 1948; on 3 April Jewish forces attacked the Palestinian village of Al-Qastal.  Fighting has raged there for several days.  The company is now being thrown into the fight, and Captain Avi Peled, the company commander, is personally leading the first action.  He has maneuvered the company southeast of Al-Qastal, sneaking up behind an enemy machine gun position that has pinned down members of the Jewish Etzioni Brigade, which is trying to reinforce members of its unit cut off in Al-Qastal.  Avi has Lt Baruch Eitan and his 1st Platoon with him, and they’re plan is not only to eliminate the pesky Palestinian machine gun position, but then to attack into Al-Qastal itself.  Following the battle of Mar Gush, Avi reorganized the company (which is actually platoon-strength), so that now each platoon (squad) has eight men (if you’re not aware, casualties were pretty heavy).


    Overview, north is up.  At top left is Raftan Hill, where the Palestinians have a machine gun that is holding up the Etzioni Brigade from making contact with troops they have cut off in the village of Al-Qastal (off camera to top), while at bottom right is Balagan Hill.  A dirt track runs between the two, and at bottom left you can see an Arab farmer’s humble abode.

    At top left you can see a number of Palestinians on Raftan Hill, which is the position that needs knocking out so the Etzioni Brigade can get moving.  Down at bottom center you can see the Jewish 1st Platoon.  But at bottom right you can see something the Jews are unaware of: the Palestinians have another, supporting position up on Balagan Hill!


    “Quiet boys, and follow me.”    Avi and Baruch lead the men across the dirt track (right), closing in on the enemy position (top left), as the former Jewish Brigade Sergeant, Eli Rabat, and the old WWI veteran of the German Army, Abel Landau, set up the machine gun (center right bottom). They are quite unaware of the enemy machine gun position behind them… To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://swordofgideonwargaming.blogspot.com/2017/07/war-for-independence-fight-5.html

    In any case, the world keeps turning.  Freed up by 1st Platoon knocking out the machine gun position, the Etzioni Brigade pushes into the village of Al-Qastal, taking it, but then being pushed back out.  The next morning the company was holding security to the south of Al-Qastal when orders came down: Etzioni Brigde was again making a push from the east, but the Arab Liberation Army had strongpointed an old Roman fort on the outskirts of the town.  High Command wanted the company to make a nighttime assault to eliminate the enemy position.

    Avi turned to Danny Tzur, the leader of the 2nd Platoon: “my friend, prepare your men.”

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66553
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    You let Abel die. 

    I demand a reroll.

    #66563
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Oh No !!! Not Abel !!! I haz sadz now… Oh and an MG 34 at long last !!!

    #66631
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Vicki – Hey, it’s not my fault, and it certainly wasn’t my idea!  I was kinda partial to Abel as well.  It’s been rough, the men have been dropping like flies…  I played a total of five games (including this one), I think there were only six guys left by the end 🙁  The unit is resting and reorganizing…

    John – Yeah, I went and found a light machine gun so you’d quit your whining! 😉

    Anyway, I should be able to post the next batrep tomorrow morning.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66645
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Victoria and I really liked Abel….

    #66650
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    Victoria and I really liked Abel….

     

    We can look forward to seeing him again when Jack goes through a WWI phase. 🙂

    #66653
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    I have some unpainted WW 1 figures…..wink wink.

    #66660
    Just Jack
    Participant

    I’ve got some 10mm WWI US and German troops lying around somewhere; they’re already painted, just need to be based.  I’d like to get some field guns for them, too.

    And my stuff can get overly intertwined: when I briefly gave a thought to doing Arab-Israeli air combat, I was thinking to have a set of pilots start out as American Volunteer Group (AVG, the “Flying Tigers”), then fight as US Marine pilots in WWII (as part of my “With the Old Breed” blog), then have one or two of them join the Israeli Air Force.

    Still tempting…

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66665
    McKinstry
    Participant

    I like the feel of a motivated but essentially amateur force with just a leavening of veterans up against a well armed but less motivated force that is numerically superior. Asymmetrical fights are hard to capture/reproduce and you’ve done a very nice job.

    Never wrestle with a pig. You both get muddy and the pig just likes it.

    #66667
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    Oh, you’ve got me searching for my copy of Jerusalem by John Hill so I can play this out on a higher scale.

    https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/4011/jerusalem

    If only I could remember where I put it…

    #66670
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    But 15mm is so much cooler that 10mm…

    #66673
    Just Jack
    Participant

    McKinstry – Thanks man, I really appreciate it, and I’m glad you’re enjoying the batreps.

    Vicki – It’s funny, a guy mentioned that same boardgame over in the comments section on my blog.

    I’ll throw this out to you and anyone else: I’m about to start “Operation Harel,” but I haven’t been able to find anything on it.  I don’t need much, just more than “the Harel Brigade operated in and around Jerusalem, delivering 600+ trucks to the Jewish Quarter.”

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66696
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Hey Victoria, I’m doing a Vietnam game it you want to check it out , I’m the only Jonathan Keepers in Oklahoma on Facebook.

    Sorry for the Hi Jack , Jack…..

    #66699
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    Hey Victoria, I’m doing a Vietnam game it you want to check it out , I’m the only Jonathan Keepers in Oklahoma on Facebook. Sorry for the Hi Jack , Jack…..

     

    I found you but I don’t see any game pics.  Do I need to send a friend request or something?

    (Normal service will be resumed as soon as possible folks, please ignore this digression.)

    #66701
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    I have not started the game yet and yes send a friend request.

    #66760
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    AKA, the second fight in Operation Nachshon

    It is 0330 on 7 April 1948, and Avi is leading Danny Tzur’s 2nd Platoon into the attack on an old Roman fort on the outskirts of the village of Al-Qastal.  The village lies along the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road, which is the lifeline for the Jewish Quarter in Jerusalem.  But the Arabs cut the road in late March, and now the Haganah has launched an operation (Operation Nachshon) to re-open the road in order to bring supplies and reinforcements to the Jewish Quarter.

    Yesterday the Etzioni Brigade made an attack on Al-Qastal that was stalled by an enemy machine gun position, so Avi led Baruch Eitan’s 1st Platoon in to eliminate the enemy MG.  This allowed the Etzioni Brigade to take the village, but the Arab Liberation Army subsequently counterattacked and kicked the Jews out of Al-Qastal.  This morning the Etzioni Brigade is again scheduled to attack the village, and in order to help clear the way for the assault, the company has been ordered to assault an old Roman fort on the southern outskirts of the village.  Which is where Avi, Danny, and the men of 2nd Platoon come in.

    It’s 0330 and the Jews are creeping east along a sunken riverbed.  As they get near their objective they will split into two elements: Danny will lead a machine gun team over to serve as a base of fire as Avi leads the assault element.


    Overview, north is up.  The streambed is at bottom left, with fields across the center leading to the old Roman Fort at right.  You’ll also note the two strands of barbed wire, with channel at center.  And where there is barbed wire there are usually… landmines.  2nd Platoon is at bottom left, and now there are Arabs not only in the old Roman Fort, but they also have a three-man outpost in a sandbagged position (bottom right).


    Avi and Hiram dash forward to assault the old Roman Fort.  To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://swordofgideonwargaming.blogspot.com/2017/07/war-for-independence-fight-6.html

    3rd Platoon was called up to help evacuate the casualties as 1st and 2nd Platoons combined to occupy defenses in and around the old Roman Fort.  They weren’t there long though before news arrived that the Etzioni Brigade was having a tough time in Al-Qastal.  They had penetrated the western end of the village, but were held up.  High Command was calling for the company to attack from the south, targeting the Arab Liberation Army’s headquarters in the east end of Al-Qastal.  Dor Peleg, the 3rd Platoon commander and senior ranking officer of the company at this point, began prepping 3rd Platoon for the attack.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66768
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    A few more victories like this and you’ll have no platoon left. 

    Good report, I don’t think I like landmines very much.

    #66783
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Vicki,

    To be honest, Operation Nachshon had to end a bit early for the platoon as it was done to about only six guys left in the fight…

    And I’m absolutely positive that I don’t like land mines very much.  I can’t believe the incredible bad luck; four rolls, three men down with a 33% chance per roll…

    As an aside, here’s something I’ve been pondering going forward.  I still have a long way to go in the War for Independence, lots of operations, individual battles, and casualties still ahead of me.  But it’s not always going to be this way:

    Operation Kadesh (Suez, 1956), is only 29 October to 6 November.

    The Six-Day War (1967), is only 5 June to 10 June

    The Yom-Kippur War (1973), is only 6 October to 26 October.

    The 1st Lebanon War (1982, with earlier incursions) lasted a number of years, but fighting was sporadic and centralized around major operations.

    Same thing with anything more modern: short incursions into Lebanon and Gaza.

    The point is, after the War for Independence, things are going to go relatively quick as there are not going to be nearly as many fights.  And if there aren’t as many fights, it’s going to be tough to get a whole platoon into the action, one squad at a time (which is what I plan on continuing to do, using 5MAK, just like I’m doing here).  So with shorter wars and fewer fights, I’m considering pulling the platoon down to a single squad, with occasional appearances by the platoon or company commander (leading the point squad of an assault, and they would be former platoon/squad members).

    The other factor is that somehow I’ve made these fights a lot more intimate (at least for me, though I think you guys have seen it, too) with regards to personal back stories.  So far I’ve been able to factor in backstories and battlefield exploits into the tabletop games a little bit, but I think I’d like to do more of that, and it’s kind of hard with a whole platoon of guys, much easier with just a squad.

    So that’s kind of where my mind is at going forward, whaddaya think?

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66787
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    I think it sounds like a great idea, though you do run the risk of losing most of the squad to wounds in one action.  The more character you give to your miniature heroes the better as far as I’m concerned, just hate it when my favourite ones die. 

    I feel you’re creating something worthwhile and maybe unique with these reports, it’s sort of blurring the line between a game report and historical fiction in a really good way.  🙂

     

    #66791
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Vicki,

    Thank you Ma’am, you’re too kind.  And like I said, I’m in the same boat; I get attached to guys and don’t want them gone either.  I’m really having fun with the getting to know the characters better, and wish this was how all my games are/were.  I think I did it a couple times early on (“All Americans” and “In Country”), and this is what Cuba Libre was supposed to be, I just let it get to big (and I’m working on that, too, but more on that later).

    And you’re absolutely right about the possibility of a catastrophic event wiping out the squad, but I’ve got a few thoughts on that as well (and always welcome new ideas):

    1.  In future wars the platoon/squad will be better trained and equipped, more professional, and more capable (shouldn’t take as many casualties).

    2.  While they will remain audacious in their small unit tactics, the recklessness will be dialed back a bit.

    3.  They can still receive replacements.*

    4.  I think I’d plan on using a large squad; Israeli TO/Es are notoriously hard to find and pin down, so I think I could kind of do whatever I want.  So I could make a big, 12 or 13 man squad, which is big enough to absorb some casualties, deal with a handful of replacements, and even play games where the whole squad is not present.

    *And don’t forget, I absolutely have to have replacements.  This is starting in 1948, so while a lot of guys can make it to 1956, many of the guys we’re following now are going to make it even to 1967 (they might still be in the IDF, but they’d be Field Grade or General Officers, not still in a squad or platoon), much less 1973, 1982, etc…   So I actually need some casualties in order to introduce new characters and have them a bit known to us,  a bit of experience, rather than just showing up to the next war with a squad leader known to us and ten new guys we don’t know and don’t care about.

    But I definitely like where this is going, and I’m glad you’re enjoying it.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #66810
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Oh man, that sucked. But I was wondering how to handle land mines in 5 core… Those will come up when I start the Road to Hue.

    #66919
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Yeah, I can’t believe how bad my luck with the land mines was…

    V/R,
    Jack

    #67089
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    AKA, the third fight in Operation Nachshon

    It is 1100 on 7 April 1948, and Dor Peleg’s 3rd Platoon is attacking south to north on the eastern end of the Arab village of Al-Qastal, its objective: the Arab Liberation Army headquarters in the village.  This attack is in support of the Etzioni Brigade’s attack, which has bogged down in the west end of the village.  2nd Platoon had just taken the old Roman Fort south of the village, but casualties have been so bad that 1st and 2nd Platoons have been combined, and they are manning defensive positions there while 3rd Platoon assaults into Al-Qastal from the south.


    Overview of the eastern end of the village of Al-Qastal, north is up.  Lots of dwellings and shops made of stone, numerous stone walls, the Jews will attack from the south, and their objective is the Arab Liberation Army headquarters, which is the building at top center.

    You can see Palestinian Arabs spread across the top of the map, occupying the HQ (top center) and the buildings to its left and right.  3rd Platoon is spread across the bottom: Dor has a certain tactical flair.  If you recall, his platoon fought in the south of Mar Gush, where he split his forces in the face of an attack by superior numbers, leaving several men to occupy a trenchline while he led the remainder on a ‘right hook’ to flank the enemy attack.  It worked then, and now he’s trying an equally risky plan: he has placed his machine gun team in the center, but then he decided on having two small (three men each) enveloping elements (bottom left and bottom right), rather than a more traditional, and more tactically sound, single enveloping element of six men.  Aside from the fact they are more of assault elements than enveloping elements as the enemy’s front is too broad to be flanked (due to tactical considerations: friendly fire to the left as the Etzioni Brigade is there, and not wanting to have an exposed flank as the edge of the village is just off table to right).  We’ll see how this goes…


    The platoon commander, Dor Peleg, spots an enemy soldier dashing across the road to help a comrade.  Dor sights in with his Lee-Enfield, and fires.  To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://swordofgideonwargaming.blogspot.com/2017/07/war-for-independence-fight-7.html

    The remaining Jews of the company quickly consolidated their positions in the village of Al-Qasat; lack of manpower dictated they abandon their positions at the old Roman Fort, though they sent messengers to inform the local Palmach commander, Yitzhak Rabin, of the situation, and he was able to spare some troops to cover the southern flank, though he was unable to spare any troops to reinforce the company, now whittled down to a nub and expecting an Arab counterattack to re-take their headquarters.  Which arrived mere hours later.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #67099
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    Great report as always. 🙂

    Try to leave a few more fit to fight next time, ok? 🙂

    #67152
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    Good tough fight, I would have used one assault force not two.  The reading I’ve done on the IWI said that the Jews got more reinforcements as the war went on, so……maybe beef up your Jewish forces.

    #67220
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Vicki – Thanks, and I’m trying…

    John – Yeah, I would have preferred one assault force as well, but it wasn’t me, it was Dor, known for his tactical flamboyance.  And absolutely, the Company will receive replacements, just not in the middle of a fight.

    Next one coming right up.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #67221
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    AKA, the fourth fight in Operation Nachshon

    It is 1430 on 7 April 1948, and the remains of the Company are preparing for the inevitable Arab Liberation Army counterattack.  Operation Nachson has been a real bastard so far, really racking up the casualties: it began yesterday with an attack by 1st Platoon on an Arab machine gun position that was holding up the advance of the Etzioni Brigade’s attack on the Arab village of Al-Qastal.  Things got tough when it turned out the Palestinians had a second machine gun covering their flank, which caught 1st Platoon in a crossfire.  Despite this, Avi Peled’s combat leadership carried the day, though the 1st Platoon leader, Baruch Eitan, was wounded bad enough that he would spend the rest of the war recovering.  Early this morning, Avi led a second attack, this time on an old Roman Fort; the attack got off to a rough start when three Jewish soldiers, including 2nd Platoon’s leader, Danny Tzur, stepped on landmines.  Avi pushed the remainder of the platoon forward, but then he was wounded, with Eli Yadin and Hiram Laskov stepping up to take the objective.  And then a few hours ago Haganah High Command tasked the Company to assault into Al-Qastal and take the Arab Liberation Army’s headquarters.  Dor Peleg, the 3rd Platoon commander, led his troops into the assault, but his plan was probably contained a bit too much tactical finesse.  The left-hand assault element, including Dor himself, was torn apart by enemy machine guns, as was the platoon’s base of fire; the attack succeeded purely on the personal bravery of Boaz Efrat.

    Once Boaz secured the enemy headquarters building, the remainder of the company, now only twelve men, consolidated in preparation for an enemy counterattack.  With Avi wounded, his friend and former comrade in the Jewish Brigade, Eliyahu Rabat, has assumed command, promoting himself to Lieutenant.  He then put it to the platoon to elect two Sergeants and, in the face of their demonstrated valor, the picks were unanimous: the youngsters, Eli Yadin and Boaz Efrat.  Out of respect for his former Jewish Brigade comrade, the machine gunner, Alon Shahak, was recognized as a Corporal.

    In any case, the Company reorganized and prepared its defenses, and it wasn’t long before lookouts reported Arab troops approaching from the east and northeast.


    Overview of the Arab village of Al-Qastal, north is up.  Not much to say: The Plaza is at center, the Arab Liberation Army headquarters is at top center, and the food storage facility is at far right.  The Jews are defending from the western (left) side of the table, while the Arabs are attacking from the east (right).  The map, now with troops: you can see the Company spread across the far left side of the board, with outposts in the center and bottom center left buildings, while the Palestinians are advancing all across the far right side of the map.


    The newly promoted Sergeant, the 18-year old Eli Yadin, goes on a rampage!  To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://swordofgideonwargaming.blogspot.com/2017/07/war-for-independence-fight-8.html

    There are still Arabs in the northeast, busily fortifying and reinforcing a home between their former headquarters and the food storage facility.  Eliyahu responds: “Men, prepare for a counterattack, we must eject the Arabs from Al-Qastal!”  Which is the next fight, of course.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #67229
    kyotebluekyoteblue
    Participant

    That was amazing no one killed or even hurt !! Thanks Jack !!

    #67249
    Victoria DicksonVictoria Dickson
    Participant

    Nice result. 🙂

    At what point did you switch from game to post game narrative?  Once all the remaining enemy were suppressed? Or when Eli got up on the roof?  Just curious, not complaining or anything. 🙂

    #67394
    Just Jack
    Participant

    John – thanks man.

    Vicki – everything was ‘live’ until Eli got on the roof and found himself staring at four suppressed enemy soldiers.

    V/R,

    Jack

    #67729
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    AKA, the fifth and final fight in Operation Nachshon

    It is 1530 on 7 April 1948, and the Company is preparing a counterattack.  It’s been quite an eventful couple of days: Operation Nachshon began yesterday with an attack by 1st Platoon on an Arab machine gun position that was holding up the advance of the Etzioni Brigade’s attack on the Arab village of Al-Qastal.  Things got tough when it turned out the Palestinians had a second machine gun covering their flank, which caught 1st Platoon in a crossfire.  Despite this, Avi Peled’s combat leadership carried the day, though the 1st Platoon leader, Baruch Eitan, was wounded bad enough that he would spend the rest of the war recovering.  Early this morning, Avi led a second attack, this time on an old Roman Fort; the attack got off to a rough start when three Jewish soldiers, including 2nd Platoon’s leader, Danny Tzur, stepped on landmines.  Avi pushed the remainder of the platoon forward, but then he was wounded, with Eli Yadin and Hiram Laskov stepping up to take the objective.  And then a few hours ago Haganah High Command tasked the Company to assault into Al-Qastal and take the Arab Liberation Army’s headquarters.  Dor Peleg, the 3rd Platoon commander, led his troops into the assault, but his plan was probably contained a bit too much tactical finesse.  The left-hand assault element, including Dor himself, was torn apart by enemy machine guns, as was the platoon’s base of fire; the attack succeeded purely on the personal bravery of Boaz Efrat.

    Eliyahu Rabat assumed command of the Company and organized a defense, west of the Arab Liberation Army’s headquarters building.  The enemy came in strength, but they were channelized by the narrow village streets and the Jews were able to bludgeon them with small arms fire.  With practically the entire enemy force suppressed by Jewish fire, Sergeant Eli Yadin charged into close combat and practically single-handedly broke the back of the Arab counterattack, personally killing four enemy soldiers and capturing another four.

    But the enemy is holding onto a position in the northeast, and Lt Rabat has determined it is up to his men to eject the Arabs from the east end of the village.


    Overview of the Arab village of Al-Qastal, north is up.  Not much to say: The Plaza is at center, the Arab Liberation Army headquarters is at top center, and the food storage facility is at far right.  The Jews are attacking in the center, west (left) and south (bottom) of The Plaza, against the Arab strongpoint in the northeast (top right), which is a home they are hurriedly fortifying and reinforcing.  The Jews are again being a bit careless about concentration of force, yet there’s not much tactical finesse as the plan essentially to have the machine gun team (bottom center right) engage the Arabs (top right) while one assault element charges up the street on the left (left center) and the other charges up the street on the right (center bottom).

    I guess this is what happens when your Company Commander and all three Platoon Commanders are recuperating from their wounds…


    Dor’s assault, some might say predictably, is not going well.  To see how the fight turned out, please check the blog at:
    http://swordofgideonwargaming.blogspot.com/2017/07/war-for-independence-fight-9.html

    Operation Nachshon continued for another week, succeeding in temporarily opening the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem road, allowing several convoys to reach the Jewish Quarter.  But it wasn’t enough, and Arab forces soon blocked the road again, this time further east on some dominating heights near the village of Bab El-Wad.  In Al-Qastal, the village changed hands multiple times, and the Arab Liberation Army local commander, Abd Al-Qadr Al-Husayni, was killed.  The Palestinians retook the village in order to recover Al-Husayni’s body, but then withdrew for several days in order to grieve their fallen commander.  Following this the Arabs returned to Al-Qastal in force; the Jews withdrew from the village without a fight, but leveled every structure before leaving.

    The re-closing of the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road was a pressing issue, and once again Haganah leadership began drawing up plans for another offensive to re-open the road, christened Operation Harel.  As part of this process, and in the process of better organizing the Jewish forces, on 16 April 1948 a new unit was created, the 10th Brigade, AKA, the “Harel Brigade.”  The Harel Brigade was comprised of four Palmach Battalions and commanded by Yitzhak Rabin.  The Company made quite a name for itself in the Battle for Mar Gush and in Operation Nachshon, and so when the Harel Brigade was formed, Yitzhak Rabin himself asked Avi Peled if he would join them.  Of course Avi agreed, and so that day Avi’s men became part of Company A, 4th Battalion.  And the men became a part of Company D because part of becoming a ‘real’ infantry unit was understanding their numbers placed them at the platoon level, not the company level; this also meant that some of the promotions were going to have to be walked back, in order to conform to the brigade’s table of organization.  That is, the men became 1st Platoon, Company A, 4th Battalion, 10th (“Harel”) Brigade, and “Captain” Avi Peled would soon become Lieutenant Avi Peled.

    As part of Operation Harel, the Harel Brigade, of course, would be leading the way.  It was set to begin that same day, 16 April 1948, but of course 1st Plt, D Co, 1st Bn was not ready due to casualties.  Their Company commander, Rafael Eitan, sat them out of the beginning of the operation to convalesce and absorb some replacements.  But very soon Avi would be leading 1st Platoon into action as part of Operation Harel.

    V/R,
    Jack

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