Home Forums WWII New SOTCW article: 44M Buzogányvető anti-tank rocket

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  • #127523
    Russell PhillipsRussell Phillips
    Participant

    There’s a new article on the SOTCW website, by Grant Parkin. This one is about the WWII Hungarian 44M Buzogányvető anti-tank rocket.

    This spice packs a punch!

    Military history author
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    #127529
    deephorsedeephorse
    Participant

    An interesting read, thanks.  I am left wondering just how accurate an unguided rocket would be trying to engage individual AFVs at up to 2000m range?  There are plenty of images produced by a Google search BTW.

    Before I joined Facebook I thought that a) most people were reasonable and intelligent, and b) they could spell words correctly. Guess what ......

    #127530
    Russell PhillipsRussell Phillips
    Participant

    An interesting read, thanks. I am left wondering just how accurate an unguided rocket would be trying to engage individual AFVs at up to 2000m range?

    My guess would be “not very accurate at all”, but I don’t really know.

    There are plenty of images produced by a Google search BTW.

    Yes, but as it says in the note at the start, I couldn’t find copyright information on any of them, so couldn’t use them.

    Military history author
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    #127557
    John D SaltJohn D Salt
    Participant

    Fascinating, and a new one on me. One to add to the collection of weird and wonderful WW2 tank-busting weaponry alongside the Kartukov ampulomyot, the LMG rocket-mine, and the 70mm Type 4 rocket launcher.

    But isn’t the “mace” referred to here the weapon, rather than the plant? The Russians have a strange fondness for naming their artillery pieces after flowers, and of course the Brits had “Tulip”, but I doubt the Hungarians did it, and on-line dictionaries seem to indicate the hitting-stick.

    All the best,

    John.

    #127645
    Russell PhillipsRussell Phillips
    Participant

    But isn’t the “mace” referred to here the weapon, rather than the plant?

    I don’t really know, but the author has said that all his sources claimed that it was named after the plant. *shrug*

    Military history author
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