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  • #154511
    Sane Max
    Participant

    For me, one of the benefits of lockdown is 2 hours a day extra painting time. I have painted more in the last year than in the previous 3 – and I am coming to one overall conclusion – I obtain no pleasure painting multipart plastics. Strip and repaint my Seleucids? Massive job, no problem. Strip and repaint my Skaven? Huge task. No problem.

    But paint a few dozen mediaeval footmen ? It’s like pulling teeth. I just don’t enjoy the process at all. and it’s not ALL plastics I dont like – I have just painted four plastic toy dinosaurs, it was fast and fun.

    I worry though – more and more stuff is plastic. Am I going to wind up in some sort of self-enforced Ghetto if I only paint metals?

     

     

     

    #154514
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Am I going to wind up in some sort of self-enforced Ghetto if I only paint metals?

    Nah.

    next?

    😀

    #154515
    Whirlwind
    Participant

    @Sane Max,

    Just to be clear, is it the process of assembling plastics you don’t like, or you feel that there is a difference in the actual painting of the models?

    https://hereticalgaming.blogspot.co.uk/

    #154519
    Sane Max
    Participant

    It’s the painting bit. but it must be connected to the way Multiparts are made, as I feel no such enui painting single-part plastics in 1/72, or Gigantic Resin beasts, or anything.

     

    Mysterious, but undeniable really.

     

     

    #154523
    MartinR
    Participant

    Plastic figures you have to stick together are the work of Satan. Tanks, planes, trucks, guns, ships, no problem – but figures? No thanks, I’ve hated those since the 1970s.

    They are:

    a) really, really fiddly (and that is compared to horrors like Russian kits with six part artillery breeechblocks)

    b) have bits sticking out all over the place which make them hard to paint, and, depending on material, prone to snapping off.

    One piece mouldings and castings for my wargames figures please, and that includes cavalry. Just mould those riders on.

    I make rare exceptions for figures intended for modelling as opposed to wargaming purposes.

     

     

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #154534
    Gaz
    Participant

    I just purchased some of the Erewhon plastic skeletons from Warlord. Looking at the sprue, it looks like the feet are separate from the legs. SEPARATE FEET FFS!!! Is somebody at WG having a laugh!

    #154536
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    I also hate those multi-part plastic figures. A toy soldier should be cast in one piece, and is not a modelkit.

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #154538
    Patrice
    Participant

    When I was a teenager I enjoyed building plastic models, and painting them and painting 1/72 figures etc. Then some years ago when I bought some plastic 28mm soldiers who came in sprues I found VERY boring to glue them, I felt like a very awkward Doctor Frankenstein. Painting them afterwards, not so much, but I don’t feel at ease with them before they are complete.

    I have just painted four plastic toy dinosaurs, it was fast and fun.

    OOooh… You said too much. NOW WE NEED PICTURES. 😉 …just because I’m also painting a toy dinosaur now (for my 28mm Goblins).
    “Picts or it doesn’t exist” as some Roman Sentinel once said on the Hadrian wall.

    http://www.argad-bzh.fr/argad/en.html
    https://www.anargader.net/

    #154540
    Geof Downton
    Participant

    Plastic figures you have to stick together are the work of Satan.

    I’m not certain that Satan is evil enough to have created them…

    One who puts on his armour should not boast like one who takes it off.
    Ahab, King of Israel; 1 Kings 20:11

    #154543
    Andrew Beasley
    Participant

    Strange 🙂

    I started wargaming with Airfix 1/72 plastic figures and kits but this was after using metal figures for D&D games so I’ve never really thought about the difference.  As long as the cast is clean (I hate cleaning up figures) then I’m not fussed.

    I do get wound up painting figures I’m not keen on but doing it for family or as part of a set (hence skirmish is more my go-to now).

    #154546
    Thaddeus Blanchette
    Participant

    Odd. I have just returned to painting 28mm after almost thirty years and I am having a BLAST, largely because of the new, interchangeable, “cheap” kits.

    Even here in Brazil, they are accessibly priced. You can pick up a basic SAGA army in plastic for 40 pounds.

    I love being able to chop and change my figures with ease and with all the Frostgrave bits floating about, I feel spoiled for choice.

    I do not like the Warlord plastics, however. They are stilted and have poor detail. But Victrix’s stuff is a dream! And the Oathmark figures hit a sweet spot for me: just exagerated enough to be fun, but not ridiculous like Mantic or GW.

    One thing that really helps assemblage for me is using classic model glue instead of super glue. Sticks on after a few seconds and fuses the plastic together so things are difficult to break apart.

    Yes, you do have to put some thought in how to pose them, but for me, that is part of the fun.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #154547
    Etranger
    Participant

    It never bothered me, perhaps because I’m a modeller as much as a gamer. At least you don’t have to get the banana oil out these days.

    #154548
    McKinstry
    Participant

    I don’t mind painting 28mm plastic any more than metal. That said, I detest putting those things together and simply avoid any plastics that have to be assembled.

    Never wrestle with a pig. You both get muddy and the pig just likes it.

    #154549
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    Strange 🙂 I started wargaming with Airfix 1/72 plastic figures and kits but this was after using metal figures for D&D games so I’ve never really thought about the difference. As long as the cast is clean (I hate cleaning up figures) then I’m not fussed. I do get wound up painting figures I’m not keen on but doing it for family or as part of a set (hence skirmish is more my go-to now).

     

    The difference being that Airfix ‘HO/OO/whatever’ plastic figures weren’t, with a few exceptions, multipart.

    I was a kit builder and kit basher, assembling plastic models holds no terrors for me. but sticking together 28mm multipart figures requires:

    The patience of a saint

    The eyes of a hawk

    The steadiness of a bomb disposal expert

    The penury of Pere Goriot* (buy metals, you cheapskate)

    The wants and needs of a woman your age**…(there are no metal versions of the sprue of assorted bits you’re holding)

    …and while that might make an interesting fantasy figure, it ain’t me 🙂

    *s’Literature innit.

    **humour, nearly.

     

     

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #154550
    willz
    Participant

    I am impressed by the wide choice of 28-30mm hard plastic multi part plastic figures available today, loads of different periods to chose from as wargamers we are spoilt for choice.  However I wish some firm would produce 28-30mm hard plastic figures not as multi build but as  one piece figure in marching, standing shooting, advancing and charging poses.  I would love these as 18th century figures but Napoleonic, ACW and FPW would be cool.  Spare heads on a sperate sprue would be ideal, I can but dream, that’s the beauty of wargaming imagination.

    #154551
    Mike
    Keymaster

    I wonder how metal moulds rather than rubber moulds limit the pose options, as with rubber moulds you can bend them to get fiddly poses out once made, not so much with bending metal moulds.

    #154552
    Sane Max
    Participant

    OOooh… You said too much. NOW WE NEED PICTURES. 😉 …just because I’m also painting a toy dinosaur now (for my 28mm Goblins). “Picts or it doesn’t exist” as some Roman Sentinel once said on the Hadrian wall.

     

    I would direct m’learned friend to the pics on this thread below

     

    Decorative Dinosaurs

    #154553
    Sane Max
    Participant

    The main issue I have with multipart figures is that you require some basic knowledge of anatomy, or you end up with figures that appear to be in the midst of a warp-spasm.

    I note that when they first came out, ‘multipart’ figures often trumpeted their multi-poseness. I don’t think that’s really true. most multipart figures can be put together one or two ways or look silly. sure, you can swap weapons and heads, but even then I have noticed more and more that some figures really only take one or two of the arms, one or two of the heads.

    seconded from me that people should make one-piece plastics. I cope perfectly well with it in 20mm, why cant it be done in 28mm?

     

     

    #154554
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    I am impressed by the wide choice of 28-30mm hard plastic multi part plastic figures available today, loads of different periods to chose from as wargamers we are spoilt for choice. However I wish some firm would produce 28-30mm hard plastic figures not as multi build but as one piece figure in marching, standing shooting, advancing and charging poses. I would love these as 18th century figures but Napoleonic, ACW and FPW would be cool. Spare heads on a sperate sprue would be ideal, I can but dream, that’s the beauty of wargaming imagination.

    I wonder how metal moulds rather than rubber moulds limit the pose options, as with rubber moulds you can bend them to get fiddly poses out once made, not so much with bending metal moulds.

     

     

    One piece plastic figures are possible, but the undercutting  needed would probably make them prohibitively expensive.  Unlike multipart plastic figures, multipart injection moulds don’t come cheap

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #154559
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    The main issue I have with multipart figures is that you require some basic knowledge of anatomy, or you end up with figures that appear to be in the midst of a warp-spasm.

    I think everyone with a set of arms , legs and a spine knows the limits of movement of these essential items. Trouble is some people would rather have novelty than anatomy 🙂

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #154565
    Sane Max
    Participant

    I think everyone with a set of arms , legs and a spine knows the limits of movement of these essential items. Trouble is some people would rather have novelty than anatomy 🙂

     

    You would think so, but I have seen some comedy multi-part plastics in my time, (there’s probably a point and laugh website out there somewhere.)   Add in the ‘everyone in the unit charging leaning forward screaming’ poses that is unavoidable with some of the figures available and it’s just a recipe for Ugly.

     

    Anyhow, back to painting Mediaeval foot I go, I have started so I must finish, and I have naff all else in my pile of shame that I want to start anyways.

     

    #154566
    Blackhat
    Participant

    The main issue I have with multipart figures is that you require some basic knowledge of anatomy, or you end up with figures that appear to be in the midst of a warp-spasm. I note that when they first came out, ‘multipart’ figures often trumpeted their multi-poseness. I don’t think that’s really true. most multipart figures can be put together one or two ways or look silly. sure, you can swap weapons and heads, but even then I have noticed more and more that some figures really only take one or two of the arms, one or two of the heads. seconded from me that people should make one-piece plastics. I cope perfectly well with it in 20mm, why cant it be done in 28mm?

    this is exactly my problem with hard plastic 28mm and the reason I won’t buy them or attempt to assemble them any more.  My other objection is that the figure poses you end up with can be done in single pose in a metal figure so there is no advantage to the “poseability” of plastics.

    I am limiting myself to Warlord Crimean Russians that just need a head adding to them….

    Black Hat Miniatures -
    http://www.www.blackhat.co.uk/

    #154567
    Sane Max
    Participant

    I just purchased some of the Erewhon plastic skeletons from Warlord. Looking at the sprue, it looks like the feet are separate from the legs. SEPARATE FEET FFS!!! Is somebody at WG having a laugh!

    Yes, that’s a general opinion of that set. I have heard that they look very nice once you put them together but that having done so you can never look at them again without a shudder of loathing. :). BTW i have also been told that the Wargames Atlantic are much easier (but not as nice)

    But this raises an interesting example of a gap in my phobia – the very first plastic figure set I owned was the GW plastic skeletons from the late 80’s, they were lovely looking and great fun. I only bought them as ‘summon skeletons’ was a spell you could have in them days even if you were not an undead player, and I ended up buying several boxes. so maybe it’s not ALL plastic figures. Interesting.

     

    But seriously, I pay Top Sculptors big bucks to know what a human should look like. If I wanted to have to pose my own figures I would take a course.

     

     

     

     

    #154568
    Mike
    Keymaster

    the very first plastic figures I owned was the GW plastic skeletons from the late 80’s, they were lovely looking and great fun.

    Agreed, I found the 40k plastics easy and fun also, Beakies and IG.

    #154582
    willz
    Participant

    the very first plastic figures I owned was the GW plastic skeletons from the late 80’s, they were lovely looking and great fun.

    Agreed, I found the 40k plastics easy and fun also, Beakies and IG.

    I agree I loved the beaky marines and the early GW plastic, ah nostalgia.

    #154584
    willz
    Participant

    I am impressed by the wide choice of 28-30mm hard plastic multi part plastic figures available today, loads of different periods to chose from as wargamers we are spoilt for choice. However I wish some firm would produce 28-30mm hard plastic figures not as multi build but as one piece figure in marching, standing shooting, advancing and charging poses. I would love these as 18th century figures but Napoleonic, ACW and FPW would be cool. Spare heads on a sperate sprue would be ideal, I can but dream, that’s the beauty of wargaming imagination.

    I wonder how metal moulds rather than rubber moulds limit the pose options, as with rubber moulds you can bend them to get fiddly poses out once made, not so much with bending metal moulds.

    One piece plastic figures are possible, but the undercutting needed would probably make them prohibitively expensive. Unlike multipart plastic figures, multipart injection moulds don’t come cheap

    I know several years ago a single injection mould sprue cost about £10,000 – 12,000 to produce.  How many figures do you have to sell to get a return on your investment.

    #154592
    Etranger
    Participant

    I know several years ago a single injection mould sprue cost about £10,000 – 12,000 to produce. How many figures do you have to sell to get a return on your investment.

    Which is of course why hard plastic ranges (multipose or not) are usually limited to the bigger selling periods & eras. Even with multiple figures on a single frame there is a large investment cost in producing them.

    #154593
    Thaddeus Blanchette
    Participant

    I have one of those little posable wooden illustrator’s dolls, Ssane Max, which I occasionally use to pose figures. That said, Warlord’s are particularly easy to screw up, while North Star’s stuff for Oathmark is almost impossible to screw up. Victrix is in the middle, but they give you a big list of what arms fit with what figures, so that helps.

    Victrix is the worst on the fiddly-meter, but the mold quality is stunning. Much better than the metals of thirty years ago, that’s for sure!

    Oathmark is less flexible, but very easy to put together. They are less realistic, but nicely detailed.

    Warlord has mushy details, stilled poses, and are a royal pain to put together. I bought some thirty because they are relatively cheap in Brazil and I liked their Black Seas plastics. The figs are now filling out back ranks in my archer blocks and that is where they will stay.

    Really, with contact cement, putting these together is soooooo much easier than the filing, pinning and filling one needs to do with multipart metals. Even if there are gaps, all you need to do is wait a minute, then smoosh the parts together a bit more.

    For those who fondly remember old GW plastics, check out Northstar’s Oathmark and Frostgrave lines. They are finally what drew me back to giants from 3mm. Some serious thought went into these in terms of giving you a decent amount of choices, but reducing fiddliness to a minimum. Putting them together reminds me very much of tackling the old beakies.

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

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