Home Forums WWII Panzer Aces 6mm Batrep with Hell Hath No Fury

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  • #44959
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    So, this is it, the first battle report from our new campaign, “Panzer Aces.”  The campaign will be played out using 6mm forces, and we will follow two brothers leading a tank platoon with the fictional 52nd Panzer Division, from Barbarossa in June 1941 to the bitter end in May 1945, all on the eastern front.  The platoon will start in Pz IIIFs (short 50mm guns), then graduate to long 50mm guns (Pz IIIJ, March 1942), to Pz IVG (December 1943), Pz IVH (June 1943), and end with the Panther (November 1944).  They will face an array of Soviet vehicles, guns, and troops, from the little T-60s all the way through the JS-2s.

    Hans (the elder brother and platoon commander), a Sergeant and commander of the Tank 201, and Franz Mueller (the younger brother), a Corporal and commander of Tank 203, are from a small village in Bavaria.  They joined in the inter-war years, both in the infantry but volunteering for the blossoming Panzer Corps when the opportunity arose.  They were members of the 4th Panzer Division during the blitzkrieg through Poland and then France, performing well.  This led to their promotions, and when, following the fall of France, the formation of the 52nd Panzer Division was being formed, they both volunteered as it secured spots for them to become tank commanders.  Their platoon is comprised of four tanks split into two sections of two tanks, one led by Hans in 01 and one led by Franz in 03.  Tank 202 is led by Corporal Heine and Tank 204 is led by Corporal Schultze.

    After much training and preparation, today is the day of invasion, 22 June 1941.  German forces, massed on the frontier in Poland opposite the Soviet lines, moved forward in the pre-dawn darkness, and then a ferocious artillery barrage was unleashed.  As the barrage pounded Soviet forward positions and the sun crested the horizon, airplanes of the Luftwaffe filled the skies, destroying Soviet aircraft on the ground and further pounding the Red Army.  Wehrmacht infantry poured through the Soviet front line, largely a walk through but with pockets of intense fighting.

    The company commander called his platoon commanders together at approximately 1100; in two hours we march on the Soviets.  The infantry have opened holes in the lines and now the panzers will strike.  Our guidance is to pour through the holes created by the infantry, do not get bogged down!  We will push, moving to encircle the Soviet formations, and then we will continue to push, cutting them off and destroying their rear echelon elements, we must keep them off balance.  We will move forward through here (tapping map), advance along this axis (tapping map), advancing on this bridge (tapping map).  The Soviets will try to throw up new defensive lines, but these must be smashed on the run, the bridge must be taken (slapping the map with his swagger stick)!

    **This is the first scenario from the Hell Hath No Fury book, “Dawn Patrol,” while the bridge will be the next fight.


    Overview of map, left is north, west is bottom.  The Panzer Platoon is at bottom center right, while the three poker chips are blinds (or ‘PEFs’ in NUTS!/Hell Hath No Fury speak).  The road is for decoration only, not conferring any movement bonus, while there are two hills and numerous woods that block line of sight.  The Panzer order of march is: Hans in 201, Heine in 202, Franz in 203, and Schultze in 204.


    First contact is the German tank platoon speeding up the road, spotting two Soviet trucks towing 45mm anti-tank guns over to their right.  To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://blackhawkhet.blogspot.com/2016/07/panzer-aces-6mm-batrep-with-hell-hath.html

    We had a great time, the boy is already asking me when we can play again, and we look forward to getting another fight in this coming weekend.  I plan on playing about eight engagements per ‘stage’ of the war, so eight for early Barbarossa, eight for the autumn/winter push on Moscow, eight for spring/fall of 1942, eight for the relief of Stalingrad, eight for the spring of ’43 and Kursk, eight for the defensive battles that winter, eight for Bagration/summer ’44, eight for the breakout fights of that winter, and eight for the end, which will probably go through Hungary and end in Czeckoslakia, though I’m also toying with going on a different route and getting trapped in the Baltics.  I will not be doing Berlin.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #44960
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    I really liked this scenario! The anti-tank screen was a great outcome for the blinds. Tank vs. tank combat was actually a rare occurance in Russia usually. Were the AT guns the standard M1937 45mm ATG’s with the crappy ammo? What is the approximate ground scale in the game? It’s a pity the ATR’s didn’t get into the action more. Great stuff and tell Little-Jack I liked his pluck and aggressive initiative, you may have a nascent tanker in the making there Marine. Get him a set of throat mics and a pair of goggles and binocs for the next game! Tally Ho!

    Cheers and good gaming to you both and I forgive you for your abjuration of the comely and ever so seductive Pz. 38(t)’s.

    Rod Robertson.

    #44962
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Good game Just Jack, glad the Boy had fun and wants to game again !!!

    #44969
    Thuseld
    Participant

    Unfortunately my wallet does not like this, because I will probably be making a move into 6mm WW2 over the coming months. I can’t really afford to, but it just looks amazing.

    #44974
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Rod – Thanks man, the game was fun and we’ll hit scenario #2 this weekend, where I know there’ll be at least one tank, a KV-1 guarding the bridge.  The name of the scenario is “The Troll,” and the mission is to seize a bridge, the point being every bridge has its troll.  We’ll see how it goes.  I treated the ATGs as 45mm guns, didn’t get specific enough to worry about ammo type (for the tanks we’re working on a simple ‘AT or HE’).  I actually don’t know what the proposed ground scale is for the rules; they are designed to be played on a 3′ x 3′ table, which is what I used.  However, they were also designed to be played in 15mm (to be fair, the rules say you can use whatever size you want), which obviously makes everything point blank range.  I don’t like constant, in your-face fights so I went with 6mm to try to give it some space.

    John – Thanks, and the boy has turned into quite the little wargamer.

    Thusfeld – Thanks to you as well, and the microarmor is a good price per vehicle, and you don’t have to go as crazy as I did.  If you’re looking specifically at these rules, you don’t need halftracks, trucks, guns, infantry, or armored cars, and I could have gotten away (at least for early Barbarossa, having to upgrade later, which I’ll have to do anyway) with simply buying a pack of Pz IIIs and two or three packs of Soviet tanks (I’d go with T-26s and BTs) and you’re ready to play.  In the next phase of the war, keep your Pz IIIs and buy 2-3 packs of T-34s.  In any case, good luck!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #44975
    Gaz045
    Participant

    Terrific little scenario and AAR! Occasionally I stumble on a source of INSPIRATION for my sometimes waning interest and then Whammo! This is one of those moments!

    Great stuff indeed,low level and tactically challenging, I shall be attempting to emulate this!!

    Thanks for posting!

    "Even dry tree bark is not bitter to the hungry squirrel"

    #44978
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Gary,

    Thanks for the kind words, and I’m glad to be of service.  I’m the same; I wouldn’t have a wargaming blog if it weren’t for other gamers that inspired me.  I look forward to hearing about your battles.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #44981
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    Why not paint a KV-1 electric blue with cornflower blue highlights and call it a KB-1 in honour of a certain Okie with leftist-Norse pagan leanings? It would be very photogenic on your table!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #44983
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Snort…..

    #44985
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Nah, there are already plenty of Commies on the table.  Plus he’s too old for the Eastern Front 😉

    V/R,
    Jack

    #44986
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    It’s true….I am old now….I’ll just guard the Swiss border while you kids take Moscow….

    #44987
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Careful Jack, you’ll make him feel blue!

    So if you have created a table of possible opposition forces for the Fighting 52nd, then what kind of forces might we expect to see? Are they limited to the minis which you have shown us or are you holding back forces in order to surprise the audience? Will you be forthright and share or coy and mysterious?

    If you’re interested in a good read look up “Tank Warfare on the Eastern Front, 1941-1942” by Robert Forczyk (Sp?). It’s a great book which is chock-full of great scenario ideas. He also covered the period 1943-1945 in a second book of the same name. Both are excellent pieces of work and both are well written too.

    On to Minsk!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #44988
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Don’t worry John, we’ll keep you tucked away, safe and sound 😉

    Rod – nah man, not being mysterious, you’ve seen everything I have.  What happens in each game is that three Potential Enemy Force (PEF) markers are placed on the table, and when the marker (I use poker chips, they can be seen in the first photo) is in LOS of my troops I roll on one table to see if something is there, and if there is something, I roll on a second table to see what it is.  In this game the first PEF was nothing, the second two trucks towing ATGs, and the third was four ATGs and three infantry squads.  But either could have been a platoon of tanks, or nothing, it all depends on the die rolls.

    Not sure what else I should have; what am I missing?  I should say these forces are just for the beginning of the war.  The Germans will go from Pz IIIFs to IIIJs, to IVGs to IVH/Js, to Panthers as the war goes in.

    The Soviets will phase most of these vehicles out, adding substantially more T-34s (which will upgrade from 76mm guns to 85mm guns), and adding BA-64s, SU-76s, 85s, 122s, and 152s, and some JS-IIs at the end.  I’ll probably cheat and use my T-60s as T-70s, and I’ll definitely cheat and use my current ATGs as 45mm, 57mm, and 76.2mm guns.

    I guess if you’re looking for T-28s, T-35s, and KV-2s for early war, no, I won’t be using any of those.  There just weren’t that many of them, I don’t want to shell out more cash for them, and they don’t provide anything capability-wise that is significantly different/greater than what I already have.  If you’re simply looking for a monster on the table, the KV-1 suits that role just fine.

    Did you see my reply regarding your pursuit question (in the forces post here inTWW)?

    V/R,

    Jack

    #44989
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    LOL !!!!

    #44990
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack
    I did indeed see your answer to the pursuit question and it is a good one assuming that the Soviets are on the defensive. But many of the tank-on-tank engagements between the Wehrmacht and the Red Army in the early part of the invasion were frantic and near suicidal attacks by Soviet armoured formations. During such attacks the Soviets did press the attack as hard as they could and when it came to T-34’s or KV-1’s they would drive right into the Germans and press the attack as closely as they could. This often happened with lighter tanks too because their 45mm guns and ammo were so poor that they had to close to very short ranges to have a reasonable chance of disabling or destroying German medium tanks like the Pz. III and the Pz IV. The Soviets suffered from logistical failures on a grand scale in the early war and there are quite a few instances of Stavka ordering attacks using tanks which had not received ammunition or fuel. Thus Soviet tankers sometimes had little or no ammo to defeat the German panzers and thus took to the desperate tactic of ramming German tanks with their own in combat. So if the Soviets are on an offensive footing, and your German tanks are counter attacking, then the Red Amy tankers might very well pursue the Germans with speed and deadly resolve.

    As to what kit you need, the Germans seem pretty set. You might think about adding some short-barreled Pz IV’s for your platoon to escort and protect in anti infantry combat. Also some Pz II C/D-F’s might be good for light tanks scouting. Remember at this time a panzer company had a mix of light and medium tanks. So 17 Pz III and 5-6 Pz II would be the full strength of a medium tank company. I know your focus is on the Pz III platoon but it would often be tasked to work closely with Pz II’s and Pz IV’s.

    For later german kit you seem to have it nailed down pretty well. The only thing you might give some thought to would be using Pz IV F’s and F2’s before bringing on the G’s and H’s in late 43 and 44. The F’s and F2’s were the workhorse tanks of the mid war from 1942-44.

    For the Soviets you also seem to have things well in hand. The only suggestion I have here is to consider including some British and American kit from lend lease. For the Brits the most widely used tank was the Valentine IIRC but Matilda’s and Churchills were also sent. For America the Sherman and Sturats were sent in large numbers as well as M3 White Scout Cars and M3 Halftracks. The Sherman’s mostly had the long 76mm gun. Grants were also sent but from what I recall they were used but unpopular with the Red Army.

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #44991
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    The TWW gremlins are making a strong appearance tonight with editing script appearing and jumping cursors galore. I can’t seem to edit these out effectively as it only allows one edit before the jumping cursor takes you to other parts of your text. You have to save and re-edit over and over again.

    #45004
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Rod,

    Regarding pursuit, I agree with a lot of the points.  I think where I diverge is early war vs late war, where Soviet armor was much more aggressive in the latter, and…  I don’t know if I want to say passive/non-aggressive, but just suffered from logistics (as you mentioned) and command and control issues.  Lethargic might be a good word.  And while there was some intense armor fighting early in the war, I recall reading that, prior to the winter counteroffensive in 1941, more than half of Soviet armor losses were non-battle.  Aside from mechanical issues there were a tremendous amount of armored vehicles bagged in the grand encirclements, simply surrendered, and quite a few tanks that managed to break out of the encirclements were still lost when they were abandoned due to lack of fuel.

    Regarding ramming, well, that’s always been the subject of quite a bit of discussion, hasn’t it?  How often did it actually occur in real life vice Soviet stories of their heroic troops defending the Rodina…

    And the last part of this is, from my reading, it seems the Germans (I’d imagine due to better training and command and control) were generally good at continuous movement in the attack, but they would slow down so as to keep the enemy in front of them, using gunnery to destroy enemy guns and tanks, whereas the Soviet tanks in the attack were much more into the breakthrough/breakout, simply running through the Germans.  In reading I think you see this throughout the war, and I’ve read numerous stories where that’s how some of the early-war monsters were destroyed.  The Soviet heavy tanks just kept pushing forward, and the German tanks actually about-faced and followed them, ultimately defeating weaker rear armor, or simply immobilizing the beast.  So I’m still pretty confident of not running into too many situations where the Soviets run down individual vehicles, and of my German platoon’s ability to break contact if/when necessary (assuming they make it through the initial gun fight).  We may see in the next battle.

    Regarding more forces, I’m not going to be purchasing any more German tanks (that is, tanks not for the platoon I’m following).  I take your point about working closely with Pz IIs and IVs, etc…, but that’s just not what my game is about.  My game is about these four German tanks, and even the German halftracks and infantry are purely for decoration.  I used them in this batrep simply to handle beat up Soviet infantry cowering at the edge of the wood to push the narrative of the tanks pushing forward; for game purposes I could have just had the tanks nose around the edge of the wood and finish them off.  That didn’t seem sporting 😉  And it would have resulted simply in a bunch of dice rolls that wouldn’t have altered the complexion of the game, so infantry up!

    And whatcha talking about with the Pz IVs?  I plan on the platoon running IIIFs until March 1942, then upgrading to IIIJs.  Then they will upgrade to IVGs in December 1942, right before charging into Winter Storm.  Then they’ll get IVHs right before Kursk, and keep them until getting Panthers either at the end of ’44 or the very beginning of ’45, still need to figure that out.

    For the Soviets, I hadn’t really considered US/British Lend-Lease.  I don’t want to go too far down that path; maybe for a bit of variety I’ll throw in a pack of Shermans (I know the Valentines were more numerous, but were crap for armor engagements).  And they’ll be staying away from the “Coffin For Seven Brothers” 😉

    V/R,
    Jack

    #45013
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    Look up the Battles of Raseiniai and Brody to see how aggressive and often suicidal Soviet tank attacks were at the start of Barbarossa.

    About the Pz IV F and F2, I stand corrected. It seems that the Pz IV G was produced in greater numbers and was the greater workhorse in the mid-war period. Thanks for forcing me to research my misconception and to correct it. 

    With regards to lend lease tanks your chances of surviving against Valentine VII’s would be better than against Shermans! 

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

     

    #45035
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Rod,

    The two battles you mentioned seemed to do nothing but reinforce what I said. I Dubno the Soviets had more tanks than the entire Getman Army, and despite the fact they had a huge number (443) of KV-1s and T-34s (and another approximately 3000 tanks!), they not only got beat, they were obliterated, with only aapproximately 10% even surviving into July ’41.

    But you’re definitely right about the Valentines;)

    V/R,

    Jack

    #45381
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    No more Panzer Aces? I thought another Barbarossa report was in the pipeline – have you been distracted by naughty Napoleonics again? Bad Jack!

    Cheers and looking forward to the next installment.

    Rod Robertson.

     

    #45385
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    Rod – Ask, and ye shall receive!

    The Wehrmacht is pushing east relentlessly, its men snatching sleep an hour or two at a time. It’s 0930 on June 24, 1941, the third day of the invasion. The brothers Mueller have led their platoon onward at speed; following the initial fight on D-Day, they haven’t had any real contact. The few Soviets they’ve seen were either dead (from airstrikes), doggedly retreating, or surrendering, and the platoon paid them no mind, pushing forward towards the bridge serving as the objective for the initial thrust. All four Panzer IIIs are in good fighting order, crews looking for a fight. Good thing, as aerial reconnaissance has reported a strong Soviet presence near the bridge.

    Once again this fight is in 6mm Microarmor from GHQ, using Two-Hour Wargames’ “Hell Hath No Fury” rules, which I have modified to add in infantry, anti-tank guns, trucks, and armored cars.


    Overview of map, north is left. The Panzer Platoon is at bottom left (northwest), while the bridge is at top center (east). There are two poker chips (top right and center) representing Potential Enemy Forces (PEFs), and the bridge is also, for all intents and purposes, a third PEF. As a quick aside, I’ve gotten questions regarding my PEF table, so I’ve included it in this blog post.

    To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://blackhawkhet.blogspot.com/2016/07/wwii-microarmor-panzer-aces-batrep-2.html

    Well, I don’t want to hand out any spoilers, but it was a bit rough… The boy is not happy and is looking for revenge, as am I, so stay tuned as we’ll be playing another this coming weekend. I also got in fights number 7 and 8 for the Royal Marines in Afghanistan, I’ll be posting them as soon as I can.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #45386
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Have you no Stuka’s !!!!! You need them to take out a KV-1 !!! Sure the bombs would blow up the bridge as well but…….Pz111 against a KV-1 !!!!

    #45485
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    Wow! From walk overs to riding into the valley of death! Two extremes in two posts. Great action and divine intervention too. What more could we ask for? Really enjoyed this one Jack and thanks for including your set-up tables. Was Pz 201 destroyed by her crew or will the Soviets be able to recover her and use her against you as a modified SU-76i?

    I am heartened to see that Kaptan Kobold will be harassing you to dish more details. He seems like a very sensible fellow indeed. Well done, Jack!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #45487
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Kyote – Dammit John, read the above posts!!!  😉  No, I don’t have any Stukas, at least not under my operational control, so they won’t be showing up on table.  It’s not that the German Army/Air Force doesn’t exist, it just doesn’t on the tabletop.  So, for example, in this game my little platoon was spearheading its company, which was spearheading its battalion, which was spearheading its regiment, which was spearheading the entire 52nd Panzer Division (at least in this sector).  So my platoon runs up to grab the bridge; all we have is our four tanks.  We get smacked and fall back.  Now the Division pulls up arty, calls in air support, deploys the rest of the company, and makes a push for the bridge, finally taking it.  But that is not reflected on the ‘on  table’ action, only the stuff about my four tanks is.  It’s ‘perspective based wargaming,’ where you only control your own little portion of the fight.  There may even be other German units on the board at times (such as the PzGren you saw at the end of fight #1), but I don’t control those, they are non-player characters, and that sort of stuff will be kept to a minimum for my tabletop fights.

    Rod – Yeah, a heck of a fight.  What I’m most angry about is the fact I actually got a lucky shot in, one good enough to force him to take a crisis test, and he miraculously passed it on Rep 3!!!  Yeah, Kaptain Kobold was some of my motivation for getting into Hell Hath No Fury to begin with, and I’ll throw my vehicle stats into the next post.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #45489
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Bummer about the Stukas……

    #45491
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Ah, it’s no sweat man, it’s just the rules.

    It would be my like me commenting on your Team Yankee campaign and saying ‘you need to bring in the B-52s,’ or ‘if you’re really getting beat down you need to launch your tactical nukes.’

    It’s not that NATO doesn’t have B-52s or tactical nukes, it’s just that they are not part of the rules of the game you’re playing.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #45492
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    After losing I’m bummed that I didn’t have B-52’s……….

    #45493
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    There, there Kyoteblue. You can carpet-bomb the Soviets in the next campaign. Turn that frown upside-down and be a happy little camper.

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #46428
    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    The platoon has received three shiny new Panzer Mk IIIs and manpower to make good it’s losses, and it has rejoined the active ranks after almost a month working in the recovery, maintenance, and supply sections. It’s 1430 on July 20, 1941, and the brothers Mueller are leading their tanks eastward. Several ‘pocket’ battles have already occurred, and the 52nd Panzer Division is at the vanguard of bagging yet another sizable Soviet force. Soviet infantry are without transportation due to near-constant pounding by the Luftwaffe; being immobile there is little hope they might escape the developing pocket. And Soviet armor is low on fuel, ammunition, and spare parts, but its remaining forces are pushing north and south in a rush to get outside the closing German pincers.

    The platoon:
    201: Sgt Mueller in a new tank with a new loader.
    202: Cpl Heine, who survived last battle by running away, leads the only original tank and crew.
    203: Cpl Mueller has a new tank and new loader.
    204: This is a new tank and entirely new crew, led by Cpl Wetzel.


    Overview of map, north is left. The platoon is at bottom left (northwest) and must exit at least two of its vehicles via the road through the village at top center (east). It’s a hardball road surrounded by crop fields, a few stands of trees, and two decent-sized hills in the top left (northeast).

    To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    http://blackhawkhet.blogspot.com/2016/08/wwii-microarmor-panzer-aces-batrep-3.html

    Sorry it’s taken me so long to get this written up; I actually have a Hakuna-Matata air battle and a Hakuna-Matata ground battle to write up. I’ve had a lot going on lately with work, some work travel, and then swimming with the wife and kids pretty much every evening I’m home. In any case, I’m working on the write-ups, and will be playing more games this weekend.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #46430
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Thanks Just Jack, needed something like this. I feel for the Boy. Have you read Team Yankee ??? The main character also laments not knowing his replacements names.

    #46468
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Thanks John, and yes, I read Team Yankee as a kid. I was hoping to do better than Capt Bannon…

    V/R,

    Jack

    #46740
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Just Jack:

    A good battle report and exciting action. So Herr Alt-Mueller almost bought the farm. I liked the BT’s and the pair of T-26’s, you can’t go wrong with early war titans of the battlefield. It is a shame that your not feeling the game and that you are having difficulty becoming attached to the tankers in this saga. This was shaping up to be a great little series and I shall be sad to see it shelved so soon. But butterflies must fly and flit from flower to flower I suppose, thus so it goes. I know you hate chart-heavy games but the scale and the scope of this little campaign lends itself to the Battleground WW II rules where every crewman’s actions matter and directly effect the outcome of a game. That system might breathe some dramatic life into your campaign perhaps. It really is a grand little campaign even if it lacks frenzied Marines charging headlong into the enemy’s positions and meleeing in a modern/medieval sort of way.

    Does your boy contribute to the personality development of his crews through conversation with you? Perhaps there lies the key to spicing up the social game to match the tactical challenges the platoon faces.

    Well thanks again Jack for a great campaign which is fun to read and to see unfold. I hope that such games grab your interest more completely soon and give you a better measure of satisfaction. Keep up the great work and enjoy.

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson

    #46753
    Just Jack
    Participant

    Rod,

    Hey man, how ya doin’?  Glad you liked the batrep, it was fun, and I do like playing games where the Germans can’t simply sit on a hill and pop everything on the table (quite the opposite with that KV-1, eh?).  Don’t worry man, the campaign isn’t going to go away, I just need to figure out some tweaks to squeeze a little more fun out of it.  And I agree with you; everything is better with Marines 😉

    Though it’s time I address this: “…charging headlong into the enemy’s positions and meleeing in a modern/medieval sort of way.”  I agree that close combat is indeed medieval in its violence, but I would submit there’s not much choice in the matter.  The immediate action drills (AKA “battle drill”) for the US and military of every country I ever worked with for a ‘near ambush’ (variously described as unexpected contact occurring at less than 100m or less than 50m; I’d chalk it up to being more dependent upon how open or closed the terrain is) is to react immediately to build the firing line in order to gain fire superiority and then assault through the enemy position.  When you recieve unexpected contact at such short range violence of action, i.e., returning fire while moving towards aggressively towards the enemy, has proven to be pretty much your only shot at getting out of a really crappy situation, while maneuvering in the face of the enemy at such short range is almost certainly a death warrant.

    So keeping in mind my tables are usually very small (2′ x 2′ with 15mm is what, maybe 100m across at most?), yeah, we get medieval on their ass 😉

    “Does your boy contribute to the personality development of his crews through conversation with you?”
    I’m not sure what you mean here.  Perhaps it’s a failure of mine, but there really is no personality development of the crews.  Each crewmen, in practical terms, is really just a REP number (how skilled they are) and any special attributes (quick reflexes, sharp eyed, tough, slow, stupid, clumsy, etc…), which are used to factor in things like 1) who activates and in what order, 2) how accurate the shot is, and 3) if you’re able to get another shot off in quick succession.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #46762
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I need more AAR’s !!!!

    #46775
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Jack:

    On the Marine up the middle theme, I was just having some fun, Jack. However on the issue of maneuver in the face of the enemy your case may be less clear given the size of the battlefield in this scenario. Given that the distance between the first PEF and your lead panzer was about 1/4 to 1/3 of the board width when spotted and fired at and given that the stated range was 350 meters that gives your game board edge dimensions of between 1000-1400 meters. That’s a pretty big battlefield for early war tank and infantry movement. I think maneuver could be possible given the amount of cover on the board and the likely presence of defilade positions in the more open parts of the land. The opportunity to maneuver to get enfilade firing positions on each other’s forces was also there before either side was entering into effective range and effective sight of the enemy. By effective sight I mean after the enemy is sighted but before enough guns can be brought to bear to effectively destroy the enemy as quickly and safely as possible.

    This is an interesting discussion and has the added benefit of keeping me from assembling Cold War era APC’s and painting WWII Panzer III’s and IV’s! You are enabling my procrastination and my subconscious inner-sloth delights and thanks you for this kind diversion. Keep up the great work Jack and as always thanks for sharing the fruits of your considerable and consistent labours.

    Kyoteblue:

    Six BTR-60’s assembled and six more to go! I’m making slow progress, but progress nonetheless. Looking forward to seeing your Leo’s and BO-105’s assembled and painted. It could be the tonic I need to get into a more productive mind-set and to whip my inner-sloth into action.

    Cheers and good gaming gents!

    Rod (the Sloth) Robertson.

     

    #46781
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I started work on a Marder just to change it up…but I can’t find my camera battery recharter so my camera is about to poop out!!!!

    #46803
    Kaptain Kobold
    Participant

    Never got my vehicle stats in that last post though 🙂

    #46814
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Ho-Ho! You’ve been busted Jack! The Kaptain’s kicking yer arse! Give him his stats, stat!

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

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