Home Forums General Books and Magazines Part Works mag with 3 pots of GW paint

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  • #98026
    Norm S
    Participant

    I Saw issue one of a Games Workshop Part Works magazine in WH Smiths (UK high street stationer) this morning for £1.99 with goodies worth much more than that on the front cover (including 3 full pots of paint).

    Full details on my blog

    http://battlefieldswarriors.blogspot.com/2018/08/part-works-magazine-with-cheap-gw-paint.html

    #98034
    MattH
    Participant

    Good find! I’m off to WH Smith tomorrow to grab a copy or 2. Like you say, worth it for the paint and brushes alone. I have zero interest in space marines, but I can nick the weapons off them and use them for Gaslands car conversions.

    #98035
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I’m unfamiliar (but intrigued) with what “part works” is, but that’s a nice little find that I’m sad I probably won’t find where I live. I’d have bought it in multiples for that price. The Space Marines are the new bigger (“proper-sized for 8ft supersoldiers”) ones too, I gather.

    #98036
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    I’m unfamiliar (but intrigued) with what “part works” is,

     

    Allow me to enlighten you.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partwork

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #98038
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I’m unfamiliar (but intrigued) with what “part works” is,

    Allow me to enlighten you. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partwork

    I meant “I’ve been unfamiliar with what ‘part works’ is but am now intrigued as I read up about it”. But thanks – I’ve stumbled across that funny little Wikipedia site once or twice in the past. Seems to be an up-and-comer for those in the know 

    #98043
    cmnash
    Participant

    Thanks for sharing that Norm – hopefully will remember to pop into WHSmiths this weekend

    .

    #98318
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    I don’t have any interest in GW or 40K, but I’ve now got a few figures that were free or very cheap, enough for skirmishing.

    I have a question. What sort of paint scheme do people generally use for generic sci-fi gaming? A camouflage scheme, or bright colours like 40K tends to be?

    Military history author
    Website : Twitter : Facebook

    #98319
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Hmmm not sure what you mean by generic in this  context. I for one only paint sci-fi to fit in with a specific world setting.

    So my RDFs colours were chosen specifically to fit into the background of Kometenmelodie.

    I would not paint them without first knowing what setting they were going to be used in.

    Now… that is not to say they would not work in other settings but the idea of painting without a setting in mind gives me the unease.

    If you brought any colour  Space Marines to my games it would not work within the setting. They simply don’t belong. Others may have no worries on that count, but some would for sure.

    If you have some of the Space Marines I would stick with official GW schemes. That way they will definitely fit into something… ?

    #98320
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    I haven’t played sci-fi since WH40K about 30 years ago, so don’t really have a frame of reference.

    I don’t want to play WH40K, but have a few of the marines from the magazine Norm mentioned in the first post. I also have a dog or two from a completely different sci-fi setting.

    I thought I’d paint them up and find some generic rules. I’m just not sure how to paint them. It sounds like I might have to do some homework first.

    Military history author
    Website : Twitter : Facebook

    #98323
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I read a blog post somewhere that lamented the “greying of sci-fi”, which in this context meant that popular sci-fi aesthetics have generally taken on greyer and ever greyer colour palettes over the last couple of decades (not that there aren’t some spectacular exceptions). To that end it might be keeping with the times to paint them a cold, neutral grey, or else a very greyed-out version of blue, green or purple, but of course that might not be the most interesting choice.

    It’s very rare to see GW Space Marines painted in camo (whether camo patterns or just “block” camo-ish colours, excluding the aforementioned cold greys as urban camo), and relatively rare for non-GW power-armoured figures too I’d say. It might clash a bit with the great big winged skull on their chests, but other than that, I don’t see why not give it a try if you’re not doing the 40K universe.

    Certainly bold colours are very common on that particular range of figures, and on power-armoured figures in general. Equally popular are colour schemes that reinforce the gothicness of 40K Space Marines, such as burgundy and gunmetal, or black and gold, but if you’re after generic sci-fi then you’ll probably want to downplay the gothicness, not reinforce it.

    If I was suddenly painting a set of GW Space Marines for general sci-fi use, then my current inclination (which may have changed by tomorrow) would be to paint them a kind of bone/eggshell white, possibly combined with dark gold. But this is taking into account that I tend to view that particular take on power-armoured infantry as more “space fantasy” than “hard sci-fi”, and deserving of an appurtenant colour scheme.

    On a completely different note, and not to suggest that this Parts Works deal wouldn’t be worth the price (I still think it is), it might be relevant to point out that a regular-size GW paint pot only contains 12ml. Most other brands of miniature paints will give you almost half again as much or more. GW doesn’t want us to notice, of course. It’s difficult to tell from the size of the pot that it doesn’t contain nearly as much as, for instance, a Vallejo bottle.

    #98334
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    I like the idea of greys for troops in power armour. Thanks, Rhoderic.

    Military history author
    Website : Twitter : Facebook

    #98687
    John Treadaway
    Participant

    Bold colours always seems to redeuce it to a cartoon style for me. Yeah, I know: Samurai and so forth. I just find I hard to take them in any way seriously. Fine if it’s Blood Bowl, I guess…

    John Treadaway

    www.hammers-slammers.com
    http://www.hammers-slammers.com

    "They don't have to like us, snake, they just have t' make the payment schedule" Lt Cooter - Hammer's Slammers
    #98702
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Cheers, Russell. I also think it’s quite a typical way of painting generic sci-fi figures these days, which is what you were after.

     

    Bold colours always seems to redeuce it to a cartoon style for me. Yeah, I know: Samurai and so forth. I just find I hard to take them in any way seriously. Fine if it’s Blood Bowl, I guess…

    Not that “cartoon style” isn’t a legitimate style.

    I like both cartoon-style sci-fi and more “realistic” sci-fi (keeping in mind that realism is also just another style; it’s not the same thing as reality), and incidentally I’m not myself opposed to “grey” sci-fi. Power armour for instance does look good in grey.

    One thing I like about bold colours in some sci-fi settings/games/projects is the established tradition of it. I didn’t get to experience 40K prior to the end of the 90s, but I greatly enjoy looking at pictures from the Rogue Trader and 2nd ed eras. There’s a charming naiveté and also a fairly appealing subcultural identity (connected to 2000AD comics among other things) to those bold, colourful paintjobs. They’re batty, but not in a bad way.

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