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This topic contains 28 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by Guy Farrish Guy Farrish 2 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #56657
    shelldrake
    shelldrake
    Participant

    I have always know I tend to use a lot of red when painting minis provided I can justify using it on the mini that is. That is because red is my favourite colour.

    But I recently noticed that I seem to like green as well. It seems when I was choosing which Napoleonic figures to buy, I was almost basing my decisions on the type of uniform the figure had and how I would paint it.

    I have French Chasseurs on my list – green uniforms. British Rifles – green uniforms. British Flank Coy (light) – red with green plumes. French Dragoons – green uniforms.  Nassau – green uniforms. and the list goes on.

    This morning I was looking at uniforms for my French Light Infantry, and this is when I noticed the trend. I thought “oh, that unit looks good”, and yep, they wore green uniforms (the 3rd Foreign Regiment , which were Irish… and wore green uniforms. I might still do this unit, as they ended up in the same part of Europe that my campaign is based).

    I am forcing my self to not use so much green now that I know.

    Do you have a colour you tend to overuse, knowingly or unknowingly?

    #56660
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I’ve used way too much purple in the past, especially old Citadel Liche Purple which is a fairly “rich” and saturated (if somewhat dark) shade. I’m still drawn to purple, but not the rich and saturated kind. I now like the expressly desaturated kind of purple that’s verging on grey, brown or both. In fact, it might be more accurate to say that I like shades of grey or grey-brown that have a hint of purple in them. I stocked up on several pots of Citadel Foundations Hormagaunt Purple after that went out of production, but now even that paint is starting to seem too saturated for me, so I like to mix even more grey into it.

    I’ve also had a propensity for green, particularly forest greens and medium emerald greens, and most particularly on fantasy figures. There’s something comfortably archetypal about a forest green cloak or tunic, and when painting “feudal-type” fantasy heraldry I’m fond of including emerald green, especially in combination with white or yellow.

    #56661
    Cerdic
    Cerdic
    Participant

    I seem to do the opposite with Napoleonic figures. I like to do anyone wearing a uniform that is not blue. I get bored with blue. Why did so many Napoleonic units wear blue?

    #56663
    shelldrake
    shelldrake
    Participant

    I seem to do the opposite with Napoleonic figures. I like to do anyone wearing a uniform that is not blue. I get bored with blue. Why did so many Napoleonic units wear blue?

    I seem to remember that blue might have been easier to make due to the dye.  But I could be remembering incorrectly… it might have been red.

    #56671
    Patrice
    Patrice
    Participant

    Before modern times it was not so easy to give colour to a cloth or uniform… Blue, and red, are the most easy to dye, and fade very slowly that’s why they are the most common colours in medieval heraldry. Yellow is nice if you are rich enough to use golden thread. Green was unstable — French Foreign Legion generals complained about it in the mid-19th century, it changed colour in the sun or rain; and orange also was unstable — that’s why the modern Dutch flag includes red instead of the original orange (which faded at sea).

    And I’m talking about wool (or silk). It was very difficult to dye cotton or linen properly before modern times.

    http://www.argad-bzh.fr/argad/en.html
    http://www.anargader.net/

    #56672

    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I definitely love blue. I use it probably too much. I even gave my sci fi mercenary unit Blue Helix their ironic name as an acknowledgement of the fact that I radically overuse the color blue.

    #56673

    McKinstry
    Participant

    Gray but as a naval gamer primarily, it goes with the turf.

    Never wrestle with a pig. You both get muddy and the pig just likes it.

    #56690
    Iain Fuller
    Iain Fuller
    Participant

    As I am working on the Napoleonic Confederation of the Rhine regiments at the moment I get to use the 3 basic uniform colours of the period: Green, Blue and White but at least they are a mixture so it stops things getting boring.

    When I finally get round to my Ancient Pontic army though it will have to be a mix of the best 3 colours: Claret, Lt Blue and White…..

    #56701

    Anonymous

    Looking at an Imagi-Nations tricorne era project using yellows, reds, black, white, and brown as major color of uniforms for the factions/sides..

    Very tongue in cheek such as the Margrave of Moosturd, the Count of Katzsup, the Sinecure of Salt, the Principality of Pepperingz being considered among others.

    I should start a thread on Imagi-Nations to avoid hijacking this thread later today.

    When if any condiment based factions will be considered if a base color is related – B&W, primary, secondary colors.

    #56704

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    By nature I’m morose and snarkish. I’m most interested in history’s ironies and catastrophes, in the story of the common man and woman, in the hard-working people, the lowly of birth…So, rather than princes and parade uniforms, my miniature armies often comprise lots of guys with dust all over their faded, ragged uniforms; hungry, hairy, smelly men, flea-infested, with skin conditions and uneasy bowels, and with a fair sprinkling of shirkers, sharpers, camp followers and urchins among them. Bless them all. Hiya Grampa, Grammaw!

    My paint box includes many shades of brown, beige, tan, taupe and certainly fifty shades of grey, to represent the dust of the earth and people who roll around in it. But it’s all a bit subtle for 28mm miniature figures, let alone the 15mm ones. My challenge is putting enough tone contrast on one of these drab little fellows so that you can see it from 3 feet away. My painted figures tend to blur into featureless blobs…disappointing.

    These days I put a lot of thought into coordinating the shades on a figure, not so much the colors. Light coat, so dark belting and dark trousers, but in different shades. And keep the colors plausible for the subject, those people didn’t have black leather, and their walnut dye yielded a washed-out dark grey…Of course I paint *lots* of irregular troops, civilians and tribal warriors, so every figure is a unique composition. And I go for mass armies. I’ve been at this a long time.

    My painting technique is primitive, but still improving. Recently I discovered a trick of painting a dark brown line down creases in anatomy on a nude figure, down the line of the spine, the crack of the butt, between and under the man-boobs. It really adds definition, you can see it from three feet. I’m enchanted.

     

    Rafm IN-5 Iroquois by zippyfusenet[/url], on Flickr

    Lincoln Log Built by zippyfusenet[/url], on Flickr

     

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by  zippyfusenet.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by  zippyfusenet.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    #56709
    Angel Barracks
    Angel Barracks
    Moderator

    Grey.
    The RDF are kind of like the UN or Police, and as such a lot of their value is as a visible deterrent.
    As such they have light grey colours in a world that is mostly brown and orange, they have big RDF markings on their vehicles in white and don’t use camouflage.

    My Junkers buildings are grey also, as I find it easy to weather and make look grimy.

    It would appear some of my generic stuff is also grey.

    #56718

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    That’s the ticket, Angel Barracks,

    I met my love by the gas works wall
    Dreamed a dream by the old canal
    I kissed my girl by the factory wall
    Dirty old town
    Dirty old town

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    #56721
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    My paint box includes many shades of brown, beige, tan, taupe and certainly fifty shades of grey, to represent the dust of the earth and people who roll around in it.

    Grey. The RDF are kind of like the UN or Police, and as such a lot of their value is as a visible deterrent. As such they have light grey colours in a world that is mostly brown and orange, they have big RDF markings on their vehicles in white and don’t use camouflage.  My Junkers buildings are grey also, as I find it easy to weather and make look grimy.

    It would appear some of my generic stuff is also grey.

    On that subject, exploring the realm of greys, browns and grey-browns is something I’ve become enthusiastic about in the past couple of years. Recently when buying paints I’ve had a way of amassing these colours in numerous subtle variations, even though I sometimes accidentally end up with almost-identical shades from different manufacturers. The main reason for this is that, whereas I used to paint in a fairly naive style when I was younger (using colours -including black – that often didn’t really make sense for the garments/kit/items/components in question), I’ve now come to accept that most figures I paint “ought to” logically, common-sensically have quite a few greys and browns on them. Meanwhile I don’t want to paint disparate things in the exact same colour, but I also don’t want to be mixing new shades all the time, so I’ve begun to amass a large “arsenal” of subtly different grey and brown paints.

    In that process I’ve also become enthusiastic about the concept of greys and browns that “hint” toward different primary, secondary or tertiary colours. For example, I’ve begun to realise that a grey that hints toward purple can be a world apart from a grey that hints toward green. For that matter, a grey that hints toward blue-green can appear radically different than a grey that hints toward yellow-green, and both of these can be appreciably different than a grey that hints toward “straight” green.

    #56751

    Another Wargamer
    Participant

    Earth tone is my downfall.  Knowing my weakness, I have gone to Home Depot and picked up some free room paint decoration cards.  The cards provide an easy color coordinating/contrast idea to use.  The paint color suggestions are really for painting rooms in your home, but they seem to work with clothing as well most of the time.

    #56753

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Thanks for those thoughts Rhoderic, Another Wargamer. I’m a graphic arts ignoramus, always tended to favor the language arts. I’ve noticed the differing qualities of different shades of brown and grey, the concept of ‘hinting’ towards other colors makes sense…now how do I use that concept? And I’ll have to hit Home Depot for those color cards. I’ve always left that kind of thinking to my wife.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    #56754

    Another Wargamer
    Participant

    Zippyfusenet.  Currently, I mainly play skirmish games due to time constraint.  At times I’m absolutely tired of having to think of the colors to use for my dark age warbands — no standard uniform so each figure should be dressed differently.  I just paint using the suggested colors from 1 painting card and I may end up using 5 or 6 different color cards for a single warband.  Sometimes a color card may suggest monochromatic theme others complementary or contrasting.  Most importantly, the color cards are FREE and saves me time.  I’m not a graphics artist either and I’m thankful to be able to dress myself every morning without looking like a Christmas tree.

    While at Home Depot, take a look at some other free samples as well in various departments: carpet square (small wheat field or garden patch), flooring (great basing material for special character/hero)…  .  I have taken 2 or 3 free samples and I don’t think Home Depot really cares as they are all free.  Although you might want to keep them away from the Mrs, wouldn’t want to give her the idea of new carpet or flooring…   Good luck and have fun with the hunt.

    #56760
    General Slade
    General Slade
    Participant

    I mainly do Napoleonics and I have ended up with a lot of units with pink facings.  I’ve got Wurttemberg line infantry, Prussian musketeers, Austrian grenadiers, French dragoons and Russian cuirassiers all with pink facings. I don’t know why it is but if pink is an option for the facing colour then it is always the one I will choose.

    #56765
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    I haven’t got a favourite, but if I never see a bottle of Vallejo Silver Grey again it’ll be too soon.

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #56770

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    “At times I’m absolutely tired of having to think of the colors to use for my dark age warbands — no standard uniform so each figure should be dressed differently. ”

    Another Wargamer, of course much of the joy of irregulars is their challenge to our creativity. But, something that’s occurred to me lately is that in small-scale societies with simple tech and little commerce, many people will be similarly dressed, because there’s limited choice of materials. If people wear mainly deer hide, there’s a limited color range for tanned buckskin, with variation for how fresh or worn a piece might be. If the people of Split Beaver Village dye their leggings with black walnut hulls, it’s likely that most of the men wear fashionable washed-out-dark-grey leggings. If a fur trader regularly visits Tall Toad Village, the people there probably wear a lot of blanket cloth with selvage lines and in standard colors.

    Following this principle, I’m able to reduce my design effort by developing predominant color schemes for groups of irregulars. This also has the advantage that I can more easily tell the groups apart on the game table.

    Everything in moderation. I don’t want to put my warriors in uniform, like one of those Star Trek episodes where everyone on this planet wears a bi-colored leotard, or a metallic cloth robe. Ugh. So there’s still plenty of creativity required. I just don’t have to start from scratch with every figure.

    On the other hand…a Dark Ages warband would include many high status individuals who had motive and opportunity to preen themselves in unique and colorful garments. But that peasant clubman and his two sons might all be wearing the same shade of dun wool, because that’s how Mawmaw dyes all her homespun broadcloth.

    Not telling you how to paint your toy soldiers, of course. Just sharing some thoughts.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    #56780
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Illuminating observations, zippyfusenet. It hadn’t fully coalesced in my mind before, but now that you’ve said it I agree. I’ll have to keep that in mind in future.

    It doesn’t bother me much to paint the same thing on several different figures in the same colour. On the other hand, what does bother me a bit is when disparate items that would logically be made of different materials, crafted by different processes or sourced from different makers are all painted the same colour. Often when I look at painting guides or tutorials, one of the final stages is something to the effect of “…and then I picked out the pouch, the scabbard, the canteen and the coil of rope at the figure’s belt with Army Painter Banshee Brown”. Me, I have a pathological need to paint each of those things in a different colour, even if they’re all just variations of “earth tone”.

    #56783
    Mike
    Mike
    Keymaster

    Having just started Fantasy, I too have that method adopted.
    These bad guys are all cut from the same cloth, so have very similar coloured clothing.
    Makes it easier to decide which colours they should be, and coupled with the fact I am not doing an especially good paint job, it really speeds the process up.

     

     

    #56796
    shelldrake
    shelldrake
    Participant

    Mike, that brings this up – I enjoy painting uniforms, as it is really just colour by numbers, where as having to come up with colours for non uniformed figures can be a pain, as I am never sure if I am painting the correct colours or even if it will look ok.

    #56811

    Another Wargamer
    Participant

    Zippyfusenet.  I agree with your painting methods, but must admit I get “brain mush” every now after too many warbands, which then causes me to be lazy and break out the color cards.  Thank you for sharing some good painting principles above.

    #56812

    Another Wargamer
    Participant

    Shelldrake, thanks for starting this topic.  I frequently reprimand myself in regards to color propensity when I’m on painting auto-pilot mode.  Can you please share your tip on how to overcome this pitfall?  Can anyone please share tips as well?

    #56813
    shelldrake
    shelldrake
    Participant

    Shelldrake, thanks for starting this topic. I frequently reprimand myself in regards to color propensity when I’m on painting auto-pilot mode. Can you please share your tip on how to overcome this pitfall? Can anyone please share tips as well?

    Once you become aware of the fact you tend to use only certain colours force yourself not to use them if you can. Stop before you paint and think of other options.

    As I love to plan things ahead when it comes to the uniforms for a unit I am paiting up I am now looking at the uniforms and making sure I don’t pick one of a certain colour and go for something I would normally never do.

    A good example is my French Hussars. I was going to pick the 7th Hussars (red and green) until I realised I had a ‘problem’. I am now going to paint them up as the 5th Hussars (sky blue and white).

    This isn’t always possible of course – I have French Dragoons and Chasseurs to paint as well, and I can’t really avoid the green on those, so instead I am going to paint them with facings I normally wouldn’t choose – pink and orange respectively.

    #56814
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Shelldrake, thanks for starting this topic. I frequently reprimand myself in regards to color propensity when I’m on painting auto-pilot mode. Can you please share your tip on how to overcome this pitfall? Can anyone please share tips as well?

    Look at other people’s painted figures and copy their colour schemes.

    #56818

    I like bright colours so my figures tend to be more like paintings (So I was told) and the uniforms a lot brighter than what they were in real life.

    ACW

    I have painted a lot of blue, recently my armies have been mainly red and greed as the main colours (Russians, British)

     

    #56830

    Alexander Wasberg
    Participant

    I have to admit that I have a love for greys. I’ve gotten better at using other colors lately, but I think that I have an almost 50/50 split between color schemes using grey as a major color vs ones that doesn’t if you go through my collection.

    #56848
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Chestnut Brown.

    There was a period when I was lazy and nearly every horse was a chestnut, and then hair if I wasn’t careful and leathers, and spears for some bizarre reason and – well you get the picture.

    I explore other colours now – but horses are still a temptation.

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