Home Forums WWII Self propelled artillery

This topic contains 42 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by Jemima Fawr Jemima Fawr 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 43 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #94841
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    I hope I’m not being a pain with these incessant WW2 questions.

    It’s the flavour du jour for me & although I am trying to do some catch up reading, the wargamer’s perspective from here is valuable.

    My late war British have been trounced twice by a curtailed German force. I’ve had them in defence but even so, they don’t really have the numbers and, most importantly, some real power. It comes down to their tank force: 2 X Stuarts…..which need to be hidden away from all German tanks.

    4 x Cromwells…….fast & have some hitting power but not overly well armoured.

    2 X Churchills…..hard to kill but so slow the game’s nearly over before they can make an impact.

    Keeping in mind I don’t want really much in the way of expansion, my mind turned to one or two Fireflys. However, it occurred to me that maybe it would be better to try to play a different game to the Germans, with their better armour albeit in smaller numbers, and add some self-propelled artillery. I should add that  I am quite keen to have my 3 field forces with different positives & negatives, if possible, to give a game more flavour.

    The Toy Soldier Company are about to release a 3 model box of Sextons. I know the British had a lot of success  with their artillery in the late war.

    So how about adding three Sextons which can fire in Indirect mode but also maybe try some “Shoot & Scoot” over open sights?

    I think if you can take out at least some of the German armour before it comes too close, than you have a chance to outflank, overwhelm with numbers….just use the existing British tanks with some imagination &, hopefully, some success.

     

    Your thoughts?

     

    donald

    #94843
    grizzlymc
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    Try a mix of Jacksons and 17 pdrs to keep the hun tanks at bay.  25 pounders should be able to keep people’s head down.

    #94848
    cmnash
    cmnash
    Participant

    Do you have any anti-tank guns to support your armour? as you’re defending, use your Churchills as bait for the german armour and ambush them with hidden anti-tank guns, if you can do that in your rules of course

    If you are feeling like winning for a change, use 17-pdrs – that should ruin any german tank’s day … 

    .

    #94849
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    Sextons are not going to fare well against the German tanks you’ve shown us in another topic.  Make a Forward Observation Officer stand and have your artillery off table.  Save money too!  Shell the Germans, or mask your advance with smoke.  Limit your German armour to just the Panzer IVs, you seem to have four or five of them.

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #94851

    Etranger
    Participant

    If your Sextons are mixing it with German armour then something has gone badly wrong with the plan. One of Britain’s great strengths in NWE & Italy was its great flexibility and rapidity of response. Any significant German armour concentration would be rapidly pounded by large numbers of field (25 pounders), medium (5.5″) and heavy artillery (7.2″, some US Lend Lease 8″ guns), up to and including battleships. The American system was a little different but just as effective. A single FOO could dump an enormous amount of firepower on a suitable target. This gives some perspective on the RA. http://nigelef.tripod.com

    ‘Mike’ was a Regimental Target
    ‘Uncle’ was a Divisional Target (i.e. three Field Regiments, though sometimes with AGRA assets thrown in)
    ‘Victor’ was a Corps Target (i.e. typically all the Field Regiments in the Corps, with AGRA and other assets thrown in)
    ‘William’ and ‘Yoke’ were even higher-level missions, with a truly terrifying weight of fire. https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/mass-use-of-artillery.243032/page-4

    A tank concentration could expect a Mike Target allocation. German players tend to complain when an AGRA shoots on a Yoke Target, but the RA was Britain’s secret weapon in WWII. http://www.fireandfury.com/artillerytutorial/artybrits.shtml (one of RMDs pieces IIRC)

    When they’re all built, I will be able to put a full Field Regiment RA on the table, 24 guns … 

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by  Etranger.
    #94854
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    Have a look on the F&F website for one example of where things did indeed go spectacularly wrong and Sextons mixed it with German armour – Maisoncelles (during Op Bluecoat).

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #94855
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Thanks for the solid opinions.

    To make it clear, I don’t want some unassailable superiority for any of my field forces. The joy my pals & I will have is in fairly balanced games (through scenarios, with an eye of field strengths) that will challenge us to use what we have to seek out advantages. And I will “command”, at some time, the Germans, the US & the British.

    I also don’t want to expand the size of the armies to any ridiculous extent. I have one 6 pounder AT gun (& may get another). I do think I’m only one weapon system away from getting what I want.

    @ Deep Horse I do like my off table artillery on table: for the look of things.

    @ ET. What you describe is what I think the Sextons can provide. They can be “off table” & controlled by the FAO allowed in BKC. But I could also move them up to allow the various CO & HQ commands to use them in direct fire. Carefully, of course. Their range (just) outshoots a PZiv. I don’t plan to use them as spearheads (!!) but as part of a divers attack including infantry, airpower, armour & artillery.

    @ Mark. If they end up mixing it with real tanks (ie decent armour, proper turrets) they will deserve what they get. Shoot & scoot is very possible with the BKC rules.

    At any rate, lots to think over.

     

    donald

     

    #94856
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    BTW this is one hell of a forum. Where else can you get such excellent WW2 advice & help?

    #94859
    willz
    willz
    Participant

    When gaming WW2 I have found having an anti-tank gun section on wheels most useful to combat potential threats.  Either British, German, Russian Rather than self propelled I have found towed and wheeled anti-tank gun units are ideal for ambushes (harder to spot) these units can be positioned, hidden and then move small distances as required to attack potential threats from different fronts.

    #94860
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    “Have a look on the F&F website for one example of where things did indeed go spectacularly wrong and Sextons mixed it with German armour – Maisoncelles (during Op Bluecoat).”

     

    12 Sextons and 6 17pdr M10s v 3 Panthers.  Even I would happily abandon my usual Germans to play the Brits in that scenario!

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by deephorse deephorse.

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #94862

    Etranger
    Participant

    Mark, presumably the Sextons had AP shot (or something similar) as part of their ammunition loadout? I know that the towed 25 pounders usually had a few, and of course were used as ATG in the desert for a while.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by  Etranger.
    #94865
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    What do you call SPA on the table? An easy target. Especially Sextons, they’re big, slow, have poor gun elevation…and if a Sexton outranges a PzIV there’s something wrong with your rules.

    Invest in Fireflys. Or anything else mounting a 17pdr, and keep your artillery a long way from the action.

    Personally, I’d ditch the romantic notions of fielding gallant British AFVs, and buy as many M4A2/M4A4 as I could. Lose the Stuarts and buy Greyhounds. Same gun, similar life expectancy, but at least they’re usually cheaper.

     

    And this is silly I know, but try playing British SPA in World of Tanks.  😉

     

     

     

     

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #94881

    Les Hammond
    Participant

    Easy. If you don’t want to start an arms race by adding Fireflies just restrict the Germans to a single Tiger or Panther 

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by  Les Hammond.

    6mm France 1940

    http://les1940.blogspot.co.uk/
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/386297688467965/

    #94884
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    just restrict the Germans to a single Tiger or Panther

    I have 2 of each & in the recent games, I introduced a mechanism of a dice throw (odds & evens) to see if mechanical breakdown, lack of fuel or earlier aerial interdiction meant non-arrival. It worked very well but in both games the Germans were very unlucky. I shudder to think what a few more “evens” might bring.

     

    donald

     

    #94889

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    As others have said, the 17pdr AT gun was the tool for killing Tigers and Panthers in a firefight. The Sherman Firefly was the most common 17pdr tracked vehicle.

    If you prefer SPAT, the 17pdr M-10 was called an Achilles:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/17pdr_SP_Achilles

    If you want to make things more challenging for yourself, another common 17pdr SPAT was the Archer:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archer_(tank_destroyer)

    Lose the Stuarts and buy Greyhounds. Same gun, similar life expectancy, but at least they’re usually cheaper.

    I realize I’m talking wargaming here not war. But. In a series of recent micro-armor games using the Jagdpanther rules, the Stuarts proved surprisingly useful. The M5 Stuart’s frontal armor is nearly as good as the M4 Sherman’s, just short of invulnerable to 20mm fire under the JP rules. The Stuarts could consistently kill German 20mm-armed ACs and half-tracks at any range they could see them, losing only an occasional Stuart to a lucky penetration. The Greyhound has thin frontal armor like the German ACs, so was less useful.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    #94890
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    That’s interesting, Zippy. I say again, I’m not after some Super-Killer-Ninja army & I quite like to find ways & means to successfully use what I have.

    I’ve ordered the PSC Sextons & will see how that works out.

    If it’s a bust, Armourfast make a 2 vehicle Achilles set & I’ll probably go that way.

    Achilles

    And there’s also this: a likely purchase.

    http://theplasticsoldiercompany.co.uk/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1_37_38_42_64&products_id=634

     

    donald

     

    donald

    #94891

    Etranger
    Participant

    Yes, you need 6 pounders. Every British infantry battalion came with a platoon of them, so a company could usually expect a section in support. https://www.britishmilitaryhistory.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/9/2017/10/2_-Infantry-Battalion-1944-1945.pdf The PSC model gives you a full section.

    Using the APDS rounds that they had in 1944, Tigers and Panthers were vulnerable.

    Borrowed from https://forum.warthunder.com/index.php?/topic/320188-what-is-the-actual-performance-of-qf-17-apds/ original source cited in thread.

    #94894
    MartinR
    MartinR
    Participant

    As above, you need antitank guns. Each infantry battalion had six 6pdr, and the divisional AT battalion had another 48 guns (a mix of 6pdr, 17pdr and SP mounts depending on period and division).

    It was also common to attach sections of SP 17pdrs to 75mm armed tank squadrons.

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #94895
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Yes, you need 6 pounders. .

     

    I do have one…….

    Can I wait until the War Budget recovers in order to buy some more or am I going to get some “Lend-Lease” ATG from you fellows?

    (Just keep in mind, the P&P to OZ is exhorbitant).

     

    cheers donald

    #94900

    Etranger
    Participant

    $34 plus P & P at War and Peace Games. You know you want to … 

    https://www.warandpeacegames.com.au/Plastic_Soldier_1_72nd_British_6_pdr_anti_tank_g_p/ptsb2007.htm

    #94918
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Vade retro me, satana.

    #94920
    grizzlymc
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    He won’t.  One 17pdr would be a good start.  Remember that the divisional ATk support included both 17 pdr, 6 pdr and SPs.

    #97700

    Fredd Bloggs
    Participant

    Archers, but in a static position, towed 17pdrs. Add in off table artillery, 3″ and 4.2″ mortars etc. and the Germans  should find life tough. Hell even 6pdrs placed right can make it a really bad day for them.

     

    And I hate ‘slow’ tanks in rules, the Churchill and the Tiger were every bit as fast as the other tanks in combat as regards movement, but the Tiger had a slow turret traverse which was a much bigger handicap. And M5s should not be mixing it with armour, not their job.

    #97706
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    the Tiger had a slow turret traverse which was a much bigger handicap. And M5s should not be mixing it with armour, not their job.

    BKC only gives Tigers a 90 degree traverse to simulate this. It captures the reality IMO.

    My Plastic Soldier Company Sextons have arrived. I haven’t done anything with them yet but I tend to agree that any German attacks against the British might be difficult. I still need to get 1/2 more ATGs & would prefer the 6 pounder option. WW2 is back in the queue at the moment but I might get another game in this year. I’ll let you know how it goes.

    donald

    #97708

    Stephen Madjanovich
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans.

    Here are a couple “reasonable” discussions on applicable tank tactics from “the site we shall not name”. I am not a devotee of the subject so cannot comment on the accuracy, or not, of the participants’ opinions. But mostly they sound reasonable and some are backed up by appropriate references.

    http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488125

    http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488239

     

    #97718

    Etranger
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans. Here are a couple “reasonable” discussions on applicable tank tactics from “the site we shall not name”. I am not a devotee of the subject so cannot comment on the accuracy, or not, of the participants’ opinions. But mostly they sound reasonable and some are backed up by appropriate references. http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488125 http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488239

    I’d be a bit wary of some of the comments on those two threads, particularly from one prolific poster.

    Although generally you’re correct regarding Firefly allocations, there were some exceptions to the rule, where the Fireflies were kept as separate troops. One such event was on D-Day itself, when the Canadians used their Fireflies en masse against 21st Panzer’s counter attack. (Sorry, I don’t have a detailed reference to that). By 1945, there were enough Fireflies available to allow 2 per troop in many units, with 2 75mm armed tanks making up the rest. The German player won’t like that!

     

     

    #97727
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans.

    My British have Cromwells & Churchills; no Shermans.

     

    donald

    #97728
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans. Here are a couple “reasonable” discussions on applicable tank tactics from “the site we shall not name”. I am not a devotee of the subject so cannot comment on the accuracy, or not, of the participants’ opinions. But mostly they sound reasonable and some are backed up by appropriate references. http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488125 http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488239

    particularly from one prolific poster. !

    The chap I think you are referring to seems a mine of information but I think his approach is far too….rigorous?…for me. I prefer the almost plausible/could have happened approach.

     

    donald

    #97730
    grizzlymc
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    “By 1945, there were enough Fireflies available to allow 2 per troop in many units, with 2 75mm armed tanks making up the rest. The German player won’t like that!”

    There is a certain flavour of German player who seems to regard anything with a 17 pdr as cheating. And as for the comet, definitely cheating.

    #97731
    grizzlymc
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    “My British have Cromwells & Churchills; no Shermans.”

    Then Challenger, 17 pdr and Achilles. No, not that challenger, not unless he drops a Maus or a leopard on the table.

    #97732

    Etranger
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans.

    My British have Cromwells & Churchills; no Shermans. donald

    Some Cromwell units had Fireflies from the start, – the armoured regiments in 7AD, (one per troop, same as Sherman units). The Armoured Reconnaissance Regiments (ARRs) didn’t, at least initially, for which they suffered. The ARRs got the Challenger from late August onwards.

    Churchill units had 2 6 pounder guns firing Discarding Sabot round per troop (2 6 pounder, 2 75mm),which could handle most German armour,  so they had no real need for anything else. And, as Grizz implies, there was often a troop of Achilles attached to the Churchill squadrons if additional firepower was needed.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by  Etranger.
    #97744
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans. Here are a couple “reasonable” discussions on applicable tank tactics from “the site we shall not name”. I am not a devotee of the subject so cannot comment on the accuracy, or not, of the participants’ opinions. But mostly they sound reasonable and some are backed up by appropriate references. http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488125 http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488239

    I’d be a bit wary of some of the comments on those two threads, particularly from one prolific poster. Although generally you’re correct regarding Firefly allocations, there were some exceptions to the rule, where the Fireflies were kept as separate troops. One such event was on D-Day itself, when the Canadians used their Fireflies en masse against 21st Panzer’s counter attack. (Sorry, I don’t have a detailed reference to that). By 1945, there were enough Fireflies available to allow 2 per troop in many units, with 2 75mm armed tanks making up the rest. The German player won’t like that!

     

    At that stage of the war what have the Germans got left anyway?  Oh yes, Jagdtigers!

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #97747
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Thanks everyone for the advice. I stress the size of the force can’t be limitless. I want to be able to fit everything on a table.  One or two tanks, or Tank destroyers or towed ATGs: note the “or”.

    I’ll shop around, see what’s available & at least partially decide on this.

    donald

    #97760

    Fredd Bloggs
    Participant

    6pdr Churchills then, there was a conversion kit and in the aftermath of D Day more than a few were reverted from the 75mm gun for this very reason.

    Never understood the Comets thing, One of the accounts of British through the campaign mentions being retrained on comets and they practise fired at a dead panther and found the Vickers 77mm barely better than the Shermans they were moving from.

    #97763
    Rod Robertson
    Rod Robertson
    Participant

    Ochoin:

    The expanded 6 pdr. troop in combination with a couple of Achillies with the 17 pdr. gun is probably the best way to go for what you have described – the balance between being able to win and being challenged by each game as you attempt to win,. You could swap out the Achillies for towed 17 pdrs. but the lack of mobility may bee a problem in games where the Brits are on the offence.

    Filling out yor cruiser tanks (Cromwells) with either Sherman Fireflies or Challengers would achieve the same end but they are more durable than the M-10 hull and turrets upon which the Achilles was built and therefore not as challenging.

    A third option might be to go down to your local hobby store and pick up some air support. A couple of Typhoons circling over a battlefield can ruin a German commander’s day.

    Cheers and good gaming.

    Rod Robertson.

    #97778
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    – the balance between being able to win and being challenged by each game as you attempt to win,..

     

    Rod, you get it!

    Thanks, donald

    #97832
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans. Here are a couple “reasonable” discussions on applicable tank tactics from “the site we shall not name”. I am not a devotee of the subject so cannot comment on the accuracy, or not, of the participants’ opinions. But mostly they sound reasonable and some are backed up by appropriate references. http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488125 http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488239

    Yes, 1 Firefly per Troop of four tanks was the norm.  Some exceptions were:

    1. On D-Day or very shortly afterwards, some squadrons of the 2nd Canadian, 8th and 27th Armoured Brigades were still organised as ‘Sherman DD’ Squadrons of five Troops, each with three 75mm-armed Shermans and no Fireflies.  This was sorted out a few days later with the delivery of Fireflies and reorganisation into four Troops of four tanks, with one per Troop being a Firefly.
    2. Late in 1944, the reduction in tank losses following the breakout from Normandy meant that a lot of Troops now had a 50/50 split of 2x 75mm & 2x 17pdr tanks.  Renewed losses in various operations through the winter and spring of 1945 meant a reversion to the 3:1 split.
    3. In Italy, Squadrons were organised as five Troops of three tanks throughout.  76mm-armed Sherman IIa started being delivered in July 1944, going primarily to the 1st & 6th British and 6th South African Armoured Divisions.  By later that year they were almost completely 100% 76mm.  Firefly deliveries to Italy didn’t start until October 1944 and they went first to the 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade and 5th Canadian Armoured Division, who hadn’t received any 76mm tanks.  They ended up with around 2-5 Fireflies per Squadron, so enough for one per Troop of three tanks in some Squadrons.  Fireflies and 76mm tanks then started being distributed will-nilly to the independent British, New Zealand and Polish Armoured Brigades, with the 7th Armoured Brigade in particular having a three-way split of 75mm, 76mm and 17pdr!  The 2nd Polish Armoured Brigade didn’t receive any 76mm tanks, though.  The Armoured Divisions also then got a few Fireflies.  Also note that every Armoured Squadron in Italy also received a pair of 105mm-armed Sherman Ib Close Support Tanks, with deliveries starting June to July 1944.
    4. The 1st Polish Armoured Division in NW Europe replaced all its 75mm tanks with 76mm-armed Sherman IIa during the winter of 1944/45.  They were meant to hand in their Fireflies but didn’t and ended up with roughly 1 Firefly for every two 76mm tanks.
    5. [Edited to Add] Armoured Reconnaissance Regiments of Armoured Divisions were organised with Squadrons consisting of five Troops of 3x 75mm tanks – no 17pdr tanks until August 1944 or even later.  In the British and Polish Armoured Divisions, this meant pure 75mm Cromwells, with Challenger deliveries starting in August 1944.  In the 4th Canadian Division this meant pure 75mm Shermans until some time after Normandy (I forget exactly when), when they finally got some Fireflies.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by Jemima Fawr Jemima Fawr.

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #97833
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    My understanding is each troop (platoon) of Shermans in UK service had one firefly to 3 or 4 75 mm Shermans. Here are a couple “reasonable” discussions on applicable tank tactics from “the site we shall not name”. I am not a devotee of the subject so cannot comment on the accuracy, or not, of the participants’ opinions. But mostly they sound reasonable and some are backed up by appropriate references. http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488125 http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=488239

    I’d be a bit wary of some of the comments on those two threads, particularly from one prolific poster. Although generally you’re correct regarding Firefly allocations, there were some exceptions to the rule, where the Fireflies were kept as separate troops. One such event was on D-Day itself, when the Canadians used their Fireflies en masse against 21st Panzer’s counter attack. (Sorry, I don’t have a detailed reference to that). By 1945, there were enough Fireflies available to allow 2 per troop in many units, with 2 75mm armed tanks making up the rest. The German player won’t like that!

    I think the incident you’re referring to is the engagement between the Elgin Regiment (which was the Armour Delivery Squadron for 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade) and a company of Panthers belonging to the 12th SS, at Bretteville-l’Orgueilleuse sometime around 8th-10th June?  Essentially the Elgins were delivering five or so Fireflies to one of the brigade’s ‘teeth’ armoured units and bumped into the Panthers, knocking out five or so for no loss.

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #97837
    Jemima Fawr
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    Re Churchill 6pdrs in NW Europe:

    31st Tank Brigade maintained a 2:1 ratio of 75mm to 6pdr tanks throughout.

    34th Tank Brigade had the ratio reversed, with 1:2 75mm to 6pdr tanks until sometime after Normandy, when the ratio went the other way due to combat replacements largely being 75mm tanks.

    6th Guards Tank Brigade was initially 100% 75mm tanks, but converted a lot of tanks back to 6pdrs before embarking for Normandy.  Their ratio was again around 2:1 75mm to 6pdr.

    Note that the up-armoured Churchill Mk VIIs didn’t start arriving until after Operation Jupiter and there were rarely enough to equip more than the Sqn HQ and a few Troop Commanders’ tanks.  Mk VIII and higher don’t appear to have ever seen combat.

    In Italy things were a lot more complicated, with distinct troops of 75mm tanks, 6pdr tanks, Mk VIIs and even Shermans…

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #97996
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    Please write a book R Mark so that we can have all this valuable information at our fingertips whenever we need it!

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 43 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.