Home Forums Medieval Shiny plate armour, any painting tips?

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  • #128831
    ian pillay
    Participant

    Sorry if the question has been asked already. Does anyone have any good painting tips for shiny plate armour? I have been looking at War of the Roses re-enactment photos and the plate is mirror shiny.

    Thanks in advance

    Ian

    Tally-Ho!

    #128832
    Mike
    Keymaster

    A chrome paint?

    #128833
    ian pillay
    Participant

    A chrome paint?

    Mmm, good suggestion does one exist?

    Tally-Ho!

    #128834
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    How far are you willing to go? Vallejo’s “Liquid Gold” range of paints (which also includes silvery metals, despite the name) is a favourite among many top-tier painters in the mainly non-historical scene, for the superior metallic effect. However, these paints are alcohol-based and the (real metallic) pigments would rust in water. I’ve been tempted to try these paints as I’d love to have a broader range of shininess-dullness to play with when painting metals, but so far my reluctance to deal with the extra hassle and the risk of accidental oxidation has won out. I can’t recommend what I’ve been too cowardly to try myself 🙂

    Vallejo also has something it calls the “Metal Colour” range. It’s water-based but stands apart from the “regular” metallic paints in the Model Colour and Game Colour ranges. It’s mainly made for airbrushing, but can also be applied with a brush. I’ve heard some accounts that even when brushed on, it’s a bit shinier than other water-based metallic miniatures paints. I’m not sure whether that’s really true, and even if it is, the difference might be marginal. I meant to try these paints once but accidentally bought the wrong ones. Vallejo has so many different ranges of paints, it gets confusing.

    #128837

    One trick I read about long ago is to just use the metal itself. Cover it with black ink, let it dry, then burnish it with small, hard burnishing tool. Varnish thoroughly with a non-water based varnish to prevent future oxidization.

    https://www.planetfigure.com/threads/tips-on-polishing-burnishing-metal-for-armor-on-figures.45925/

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #128850
    Vanth SpiritWalker
    Participant

    AK Interactive also has some wax based metallic colours which canbe buffed after application in order to achieve a different degree of shine. Remember though that the best way to reproduce the shiny effect is to keep the difference between lights and shadows, where you want to have the shadows very opaque, so not using any metallic paint in them. Using different glazes of regular paints and inks is a good way to achieve this: the model here was painted using Vallejo Metal Colours and creating shadows with the aforementioned method

    #128858

    Use very silvery paints.  I think GW had Chainmail and Adamantium.  Paint on Chainmail…medium silver.  Wash in blue wash.  Drybrush on Chainmail to clean up the base color.  Highlight with Adamantium….bright silver.  Clear coat the figure in the usual manner.  If you are flat coating the figure, as a final step, brush on gloss coat to all the shiny metal bits.

    John

    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

    --Abraham Lincoln

    #128859
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    My advice is to use more than one kind of silver paint. Reaper makes a set of three that, together, give a very satisfactory effect: Shadowed Steel, Honed Steel and Polished Silver. If you use the dark silver as a base, then allow some of it to show through on the middle coat, it will create dark and light shadow effects that will read as polished metal at table distance. A small touch of the brightest silver as a highlight will enhance the effect.

    The trick is that you want it to seem to be reflecting things at its own scale, not from the real world. If it mirrors large objects it will ruin the scale effect. It’s why painting things a single plain color tends to flatten a miniature out – it’s not big enough to generate its own realistic shade and shadow, so you have to paint it to exaggerate the effect and make it look “right.” The same is doubly true for shiny metal. If it has light and dark areas that seem like they’re reflecting things at the mini’s own size, it will maintain the overall illusion better.

    #128871
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    The trick is that you want it to seem to be reflecting things at its own scale, not from the real world. If it mirrors large objects it will ruin the scale effect. It’s why painting things a single plain color tends to flatten a miniature out – it’s not big enough to generate its own realistic shade and shadow, so you have to paint it to exaggerate the effect and make it look “right.” The same is doubly true for shiny metal. If it has light and dark areas that seem like they’re reflecting things at the mini’s own size, it will maintain the overall illusion better.

    Interesting notion. I’ve never thought of it that way before.

    #128873
    Thomaston
    Participant

    I use Velajo Model Air range, I’m happy with it. If you want a very smooth shiny finish you’ll have to make sure the surface is smooth. I use black undercoat with metal to give it more shade thingy effect thing.

    Small scale minis like 6mm.
    I use a base metalic color (I like gun metal but that might be too dark), a little darker than your target and then go over the raised part with 2:1 mix of that and silver. Finally I do highlight on raised and angled areas with silver.

    Larger areas (and scale models)
    I use silver form the get go and using q-tips I give the armor area a little polish. Don’t do it too much, just a few pass will do or you’ll remove all the metal. Also work the q-tip in one direction. I think I did it diagonally relative to the hight or front of the model/mini.

    Tired is enough.
    I like tiny miniatures

    #129067
    willz
    Participant

    Try this I used it 20+ years ago when doing lots of medieval armour, the video is demonstrating the use on ww2 tanks but its the same principle for medieval armour.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syDZYSpbzzs

    The product is still available Humbrol metal cote.

     

    Willz.

    #132565
    vexillia
    Participant

    My current technique wit 15 mm:

    • Black undercoat.
    • Gunmetal.
    • Black lining  (only where necessary).
    • Silver highlight.
    • Very dilute black wash (to blend layers).

    See https://blog.vexillia.me.uk/2020/03/henry-tudors-retinue-men-at-arms.html for examples like these:

    Martin Stephenson :: Work | Blog | Auctions

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