Home Forums Terrain and Scenery Snow flocking for bases- recommendations?

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  • #32903
    BarksBarks
    Participant

    Hi TWW,

     

    I’m looking to make some bases painted as earth, then with some areas of snow. Does anyone have any tips or tricks for snow bases? In my FLGSs they’ve got Galeforce 9, 4Ground, and Noch snow effect flocking.

     

    Regards

     

    Barks

    #32921
    paintpigpaintpig
    Participant

    Carb soda with white glue rings a bell, white tile corking or gap filler would be my choice. Depends on how easily they can be applied for a particular situation, I think the (acrylic) gap filler should be easy enough for terrain if your dabbing a bit on the troops or vehicles then go for the carb (baking) soda.

    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel
    Slowly Over A Low Flame

    #32923
    PaulPaul
    Participant

    I recently did some snow bases on some Ion Age figs, and I really like how they turned out: I just mixed bicarbonate of soda, white glue, and some white paint (to stop the bicarb from yellowing) into a paste and applied it on top of the earth base with a sculpting tool.

    Those are brave men knocking at our door. Let's go kill them!

    #32947
    willzwillz
    Participant

    Wood glue and Gale force snow, some white paint and winter grass.

     

    #32948
    Katie LKatie L
    Participant

    Glass Microspheres. What’s it really used for? Adding to resin to make it lighter when you’re filling volumes while repairing or assembling fibreglass or cars or so on.

    They don’t absorb moisture, odours or in fact anything else. They don’t change colour (indeed, they’re colourless, like ice crystals and only look white in bulk) and it’s chemically stable for any reasonable expectation of the survival of you, me and human civilisation…

    And they come in big cheap buckets. Frankly one of these will last you and your friends for some time to come.

    http://www.easycomposites.co.uk/#!/resin-gel-silicone-adhesive/filler-powders-and-additives/general-fillers-and-additives/glass-bubbles-microballoons-microspheres.html

    Mix it with combinations of water, thinner, white wood glue, acrylic medium, varnishes and white paint to get a whole range of snow effects.

    Examples; https://www.fysh.org/~katie/wargames/pictures/flintloque/IMG_20140523_143735.jpg

    Because you can mix it with things as well as pour it on “dry” to surfaces, you can very easily make dry crunchy snow, slush, runny snow, thin powdery coatings, the dusty stuff at the bottom of greatcoats, piled up snow, sparkly ice effects, footprints, icey looking stuff, dirty snow, mud/ice mixes, grass-poking-through snow… And it’s cheap enough you can afford to play with the effects.

     

     

    #32949
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    White sand, or unmixed plaster of Paris powder has worked well for me. Also crushed joint compound. But I happen to have access to a lot of building materials, it being my metier.

    #32964
    paintpigpaintpig
    Participant

    Well with all that to choose from Barks it sounds like your away.

    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel
    Slowly Over A Low Flame

    #32970
    paintpigpaintpig
    Participant

    @ Katie I was going to say microspheres aren’t much chop being a pretty dull colour but I saw you were using white paint. I thought of fumed glass which is brilliant white but quite dangerous if inhaled, perfectly safe once mixed in any liquid. I’ll try the micro spheres next time I’m in a position to borrow some.

    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel
    Slowly Over A Low Flame

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