Home Forums WWII Some Tiny Air Combat at Koepang, DEI

This topic contains 91 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by kyoteblue kyoteblue 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #105267

    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    It’s noon on 19 February 1942, at an Allied airbase at Koepang, Dutch Timor, on the eastern edge of the Dutch East Indies (DEI). The Killer Pelicans have scrambled three Wildcats to meet the enemy.

    Yesterday the Pelicans shot down one Oscar and one Helen, at the cost of two of their own precious Wildcats (Ensign Radecek made it back to base, but Lieutenant Collins, the Squadron Commander, was KIA), and a nearby munitions factory was nearly destroyed (10 more damage points, 29/32).

    Two days ago the Pelicans shot down one Helen and lost their only Wildcat engaged, with Lt Dapper being declared Missing In Action. Two Japanese bombers bombed the munitions factory, causing moderate damage (11 more points, 19/32).

    Three days ago the Pelicans shot down one Oscar and three Helens, at the cost of three of their own precious Wildcats (Lt Case made it back to base, shot, Ensign Green made it back safely, and Ensign Davis was KIA), and the radar station at Koepang was destroyed while a nearby munitions factory was lightly damaged (8/32).

    Four days ago the Pelicans shot down one Oscar and one Helen, at the cost of two of their own precious Wildcats (Lt French made it back to base, burned badly, Ensign Bordagaray was KIA), and the radar station at Koepang was lightly hit (another ten damage points, 23/32).

    Five days ago the Pelicans shot down one Oscar and four Helens, at the cost of one of their own precious Wildcats (and the pilot, Ens Bruce, is missing), and the radar station at Koepang was not hit (still 13/32), and one of their pilots (Lt Case) won the Medal of Honor, scoring five kills to become the Pelicans’ first ace.

    Six days ago the Pelicans shot down three Oscars and two Helens, at the cost of three of their own precious Wildcats, and the radar station at Koepang suffered moderate damage (13/32), though one of their pilots (Fitzsimmons) won the Navy Cross, scoring three kills before getting shot down.


    Last run out of the poster board playing surface, thanks for bearing with me! Three Wildcats climbing to intercept three Helens escorted by two Oscars.


    As usual, it’s an aerial melee! To see the fight, please check the blog at:
    https://oldleadbreed.blogspot.com/2018/12/dutch-east-indies-18.html?m=1

    At this stage of the game, the Killer Pelicans are down to 5 serviceable aircraft and Koepang is in danger of being overrun by Japanese landing forces, and so the evacuation is ordered and they boarded a ship for northern Australia, hoping to re-group and get back in the fight to halt the Japanese onslaught across the Pacific.

    Total score:
    Japanese fighters shot down: 8
    Japanese bombers shot down: 13

    US Navy fighters shot down: 13
    Land Targets destroyed: 2.44 of 3.00

    My next campaign stop is with the USAAF Chickenhawks, flying their P-40s out of Australia and then New Guinea, but back to the USN Killer Pelicans for action in the Coral Sea and Midway, then linking up with the USMC Dirt Divers out of Henderson Field on Guadalcanal. By that point I’ll be working the ground side of the Solomons as well, maybe back to some cruiser actions on the water. Stay tuned!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105280
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Looking forward to more Pacific goodness!!!

    #105318

    Thomaston
    Participant

    So, does the squadron have any pilots left who scored kills?

    Tired is enough.

    #105319

    Just Jack
    Participant

    John – yep, more is always better.

    Thomaston –  check this out:

    https://oldleadbreed.blogspot.com/2017/08/war-in-pacific-aviation-roster.html?m=1

    But be careful with what you want, and what you don’t want to know.  Many times I’ll play a string of fights (like this one) and update the roster, even though I haven’t posted the batreps yet, so there can be some real spoilers.

    V/R,

    Jack

    #105320

    Thomaston
    Participant

    OK, I’ll wait and read the report.

    Tired is enough.

    #105323

    Just Jack
    Participant

    It’s clear right now, nothing to worry about.

    Jack

    #105351

    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    So I’ve gotten deep into Thomaston’s “Tiny Air Combat,” having bought and mounted a slew of them:


    The whole mess, a ton of WWII and Post-WWII stuff.


    I finished up all the WWII stuff. I’d been playing a makeshift gaming surface; I’m happy to report that I’ve finished my new, permanent gaming surface, which you can see under the box holding the aircraft.


    A closeup of an SBD Dauntless on the new gaming surface. What, you’re 1/900-1/1200 aircraft don’t have red and white tailstripes? 😉
    To see a bunch more pics, please check the blog at:
    https://blackhawkhet.blogspot.com/2018/12/tiny-air-combat-wwii.html

    Anyway, wanted to show off what I’d finished in terms of aircraft and my new board, and I’m looking at getting those USAAF P-40s into the action this weekend.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105352
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    They look great Jack, I’m eager to read your next AAR!!

    #105390

    Thomaston
    Participant

    I didn’t know you spent that much on my planes. That’s a lot of aircraft, what are your plans for the modern stuff?
    The European aircraft are done. Are you after 6 each?

    F6F for scale

    Tired is enough.

    #105400

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Guys,

    I played some more games, USAAF P-40s, as promised.  I was playing and teaching my 9-year old, so only got two games in, I’ll get them posted this week.

    Regarding the aircraft, yeah man, but two things: 1) almost half the money has been for flight stands, and 2) I’ve got somewhere around 225 of your aircraft 😉

    Those Battle of Britain aircraft look great, though I’ll make my first critique ever: is the He-111 a touch small?  I’m not an expert, so I could be off, just eye-balling it I thought it would be a bit bigger, relatively speaking, or, as usual, I have no idea what I’m talking about? 😉

    In any case, it’s not all quantity six this time.  I don’t need six of everything, and I’m going to add one to everything in case my clumsy fingers break some:

    7 Hurricanes
    7 Spitfires
    5 Me-109s
    5 Me-110s
    4 Ju-87s
    4 Do-17s
    7 Ju-88s
    7 He-111s

    To make sure I end up with 38 operational aircraft 😉
    As always, I appreciate all your help with this, and this Battle of Britain shall be epic!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105425

    Thomaston
    Participant

    He111 is a tad longer than Do17 but it has wider wingspan. I thought it looked weird as well, I’ll make the fuselage fatter.
    https://www.shapeways.com/product/B5TZWMVND/tiny-bob

    Looking forward to seeing P-40s in action.
    The new board looks good.

    Tired is enough.

    #105491

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Cool man, and coming right up!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105492
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    All right all right all right!!!

    #105493

    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    It’s noon on 19 January 1942 (yes, we’ve gone back in time about a month from the seven Killer Pelicans dogfights I just posted), and only days before a squadron of US Army Air Force P-40 Warhawks under Captain Brian Jordan was sent to Makassar on the southwest tip of the island of Celebes, to aid in the American-British-Dutch-Australian (ABDA) defense of the Dutch East Indies (DEI) from the marauding forces of the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy. Captain Jordan and his men with their eighteen sleek, Curtiss Warhawks quickly settled into life on the dusty tropical airfield, happy be in the fight and ready to avenge Pearl Harbor!

    As a matter of fact, just yesterday Captain Jordan and three of his pilots took to the air and managed to shoot down three enemy fighters and two enemy bombers, at the cost of only one P-40 damaged! But the Japanese are keen on making Celebes theirs (in the Killer Pelicans games, the enemy aircraft were flying out of Kendari, Celebes), and the Army pilots expect their stay at Makassar to be short-lived as Japanese landing forces are sure to arrive any minute now.


    The new setup. North is left, where the Imperial Japanese Army aircraft are, south is right, where the U.S. Army Air Force is. East is up, West is down. The Japanese are charging in, intent on destroying Dutch coastal artillery batteries covering the Japanese Navy’s intended landing beaches on Celebes.


    The Americans, six P-40 Warhawks, from top to bottom:
    Chicken 22: 2nd Lt Macon, his first combat sortie
    Chicken 21: 1st Lt Pace, 2 kills in his first sortie
    Chicken 23: 2nd Lt McKyer, his first combat sortie
    Chicken 52: 2nd Lt Verdin, his first combat sortie
    Chicken 51: 1st Lt Potts, his first combat sortie
    Chicken 53: 2nd Lt Beach, his first combat sortie


    The Japanese, from top to bottom:
    Oscar 02
    Oscar 01
    Left: Helen 06, Helen 04, Helen 05
    Right: Helen 03, Helen 01, Helen 02
    Oscar 03
    Oscar 04

    Still using Bettys as Helens, but actually got the Oscars on the table this time.


    Turns 1 and 2 bring us to the merge. The sun is giving a nasty glare off the warm, South Pacific waters…


    And this why they’re called the Chickenhawks! To see the U.S. Army Air Force have a very bad day (or, more appropriately, to see me get my butt kicked by my son), please check the blog at:
    https://oldleadbreed.blogspot.com/2018/12/dutch-east-indies-19.html

    The boy and I immediately played another game, so next fight coming right up!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105513
    warwell
    warwell
    Participant

    I like your comment that “the maneuvering can take quite a bit of thinking to accurately ascertain the tactical situation, come up with the best course of action, and then actually get your aircraft where you want it to go.” I have had the same experience, even though the movement rules are quite simple!

    Anyway, another great report. Thanks!

    #105527
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Damn….

    #105588

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Warwell – Thanks man, and yeah, the rules are really doing it for me, having a great time.  I’ve got another batrep almost done, should be able to post it tomorrow, and I plan on playing some more this weekend.

    John – Yup…

    V/R,

    Jack

    #105598
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Those Army flyers should have trained with the Marines!!

    #105600

    Thomaston
    Participant

    @kyoteblue
    I wouldn’t say that yet, we haven’t seen a batrep for the marines.

    Tired is enough.

    #105624

    Just Jack
    Participant

    John – Amen!

    Thomaston -You’d just better watch yourself, buddy! If you don’t think I’ll cheat a 9-year old at wargaming, you’re seriously misunderestimating* my love for the the Corps.

    *Yes, I know it’s not a real word.  It’s funny how the internet often compels you to pre-explain your jokes 😉

    Can’t believe I’m letting ‘marines’ slide…

    V/R,

    Jack

    #105625
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    LOL!!

    Yes, you need to get our Marines in action again!!!

    #105629

    Just Jack
    Participant

    It’s going to be a minute before the Marines get back in action.  First I’ve got to play quite a few more dogfights:
    -Finish USAAF in DEI
    -A few USAAF in Darwin, Australia
    -Some USAAF in Port Moresby, New Guinea
    -Some USN (off either the USS Lexington or Yorktown) for the 1st Coral Sea battle (attacking New Guinea)
    -Some USN (off carrier) for the 2nd Coral Sea battle
    -Some USN (off carrier) for Midway
    -Then 1st Marine Division lands on Guadalcanal, Gavutu-Tanambogo, and Tulagi (I have to finish my 10mm troops for this, first)
    -Shortly thereafter Henderson Field will be in business, and the Marine fighter squadron will be in the thick of it.  The Army and Navy squadrons are racking up a bunch of fights now, but the Marines will easily surpass their number of sorties once Operation Watchtower kicks off.
    -I actually plan on having all three squadrons at Guadalcanal, at some point.  The Marine squadron will already be stationed there, the Navy squadron will be on a carrier that gets sunk or damaged, and the Army squadron will move up from New Guinea.  The three squadrons will probably stay there awhile as the grunts climb the Solomons, before splitting back up, probably in 1944.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105631

    Thomaston
    Participant

    I was sure I used capital M. I need to proof read more.

    Tired is enough.

    #105632
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I’m so looking forward to all of this Jack!!!

    #105634

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Thomaston – Just playing around man!  I have a certain persona I have to live up to here on the forums… 😉

    John – Me too!  Got more going on, as well: once I get my next set of Thomaston’s awesome little aircraft in hand, I’ll be heading knee deep into the Battle of Britain.  What I’m thinking to do is play that with the boy, and keep the Pacific purely solo.  Also:

    -My 6mm stuff is almost ready for Caen, which I’ll be playing with the boy.

    -Cuba Libre is multi-faceted:
    1.  I’m getting my modern Tiny Air Combat planes ready for some dogfighting over both South Leon AND Cronistria, and when those two fall (oops, spoiler alert!), we’ll be heading to the desert for Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

    2.  I’ll be getting into a bunch more 10mm fights in South Leon.

    3.  I just got some new rules for some small and quick Special Operations fights in South Leon.

    4.  I’ve got 6mm modern armor on the way for Cronistria.

    5.  Once South Leon and Cronistria have fallen, we’re heading to Kuwait/Iraq for some 6mm armor fights and probably some 15mm Special Operations fights.

    I’ve also been working on Blood & Guts, All Americans, and Sword of Gideon.  So many projects, so little time, but Christmas is coming and I’m taking about two weeks off work, a wargaming holiday 😉

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105635
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Sword of Gideon would be welcome…

    #105665

    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    It’s noon on 20 January 1942 (yes, we’ve gone back in time about a month from the seven Killer Pelicans dogfights I just posted), and only days before a squadron of US Army Air Force P-40 Warhawks under Captain Brian Jordan was sent to Makassar on the southwest tip of the island of Celebes, to aid in the American-British-Dutch-Australian (ABDA) defense of the Dutch East Indies (DEI) from the marauding forces of the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy. Captain Jordan and his men with their eighteen sleek, Curtiss Warhawks quickly settled into life on the dusty tropical airfield, happy be in the fight and ready to avenge Pearl Harbor!

    As a matter of fact, two days ago Captain Jordan and three of his pilots took to the air and managed to shoot down three enemy fighters and two enemy bombers, at the cost of only one P-40 damaged! But the Japanese are keen on making Celebes theirs (in the Killer Pelicans games, the enemy aircraft were flying out of Kendari, Celebes), and the Army pilots expect their stay at Makassar to be short-lived as Japanese landing forces are sure to arrive any minute now.

    Yesterday was a black day, indeed, for the Chickenhawks, with two Japanese fighters and two Japanese bombers shot down, but ALL SIX American fighters were shot down…


    Bogeys, 12 o’ high! Lots of’em, too!


    Finally learning to forget the fighters and go after the bombers.


    Though this isn’t exactly where you want to be. The fight was still rough, but much better than yesterday for the Chickenhawks, with two pilots having multiple-kill days. To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    https://oldleadbreed.blogspot.com/2018/12/dutch-east-indies-20.html?m=1

    I’m caught up on batreps, so now you just have to wait ;). But not too long, I’ve got plenty of gaming planned for this weekend!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #105676
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    The boy is kicking your ass Jack!!!

    #105687

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Yeah, I know!

    Now I’m trying to figure out if the issue is that he’s just that much better than me, or have I been padding my stats in solo games by cheating and not even realizing it! 😉

    V/R,

    Jack

    #105838

    Thomaston
    Participant

    The Army fliers are getting better. I’m wondering if anyone will make ace and will he survive.

    Tired is enough.

    #105843
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Kids are always lucky, Jack. It’s a well-known gaming fact!!!

    #105904

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Thomaston -It’s touch and go 😉

    John – Apparently…

    I ordered all the stuff for Battle of Britain, played 4 dogfights (all USAAF), and six skirmish fights with some new rules, will get posted as soon as I can.

    V/R,

    Jack

    #105908
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I’ll look forward to them.

    #106393

    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    First off, I hope everyone had a Merry Christmas! Now to the point.

    Three days ago Captain Jordan and three of his pilots took to the air and managed to shoot down three enemy fighters and two enemy bombers, at the cost of only one P-40 damaged! But the Japanese are keen on making Celebes theirs (in the Killer Pelicans games, the enemy aircraft were flying out of Kendari, Celebes), and the Army pilots expect their stay at Makassar to be short-lived as Japanese landing forces are sure to arrive any minute now.

    Two days ago was a black day, indeed, for the Chickenhawks, with two Japanese fighters and two Japanese bombers shot down, but ALL SIX American fighters were shot down…

    Yesterday the Chickenhawks shot down three Oscars and four Helens, but two Japanese bombers quickly and easily finished the destruction of the Dutch coastal artillery batteries covering the intended invasion beaches, then shifted their runs to the actual beach fortifications, causing moderate damage, and the Army pilots had four of their P-40s shot down (10 in two days!).


    Here come the Japanese bombers…


    And here come the P-40s to meet them.


    Lt Daniel pulls high, rolls over onto his back, and flashes through the enemy bomber formation, guns blazing. In typical Army fashion, he hits nothing… To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    https://oldleadbreed.blogspot.com/2018/12/dutch-east-indies-21.html

    This fight went pretty well, but it was not enough to stave off the Japanese onslaught. Despite keeping the Japanese bombers from destroying the beach fortifications, Japanese amphibious forces were still able to land on Makassar, and with that it was necessary for the Chickenhawks to quit the Dutch East Indies. The squadron had only six of its eighteen aircraft left, and their pilots (Capt Biasucci and Lieutenants Kimble, Goode, Daniel, Sanders, and Gann) flew them out, escorting a gaggle of U.S., Dutch, and Australian bombers, patrol, and cargo aircraft south (one carrying Captain Jordan and Lieutenants Cotton, Potts, Dawkins, Banks, Beach, Kenn, Pace, and Macon) to Australia.

    There the squadron was able to re-form in Darwin, receiving replacement aircraft but no new pilots. Just in time for Japanese aircraft of the “Kido Butai” to make their deadly attack on the port of Darwin, coming right up!

    V/R,
    Jack

    #106395

    Thomaston
    Participant

    A good day for the P-40s. I have to admit, I’ve been cheering for the bomber gunners and they disappointed me this battle.

    Tired is enough.

    #106400
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Thanks, Jack!!

    #106432

    Just Jack
    Participant

    Thomaston – Traitorous heathen!

    John – No problem.

    I’ll have the next fight up in about an hour.

    V/R,

    Jack

    #106434

    Just Jack
    Participant

    All,

    The Army fighter squadron has fled the Dutch East Indies, ultimately arriving in Australia. There were new aircraft waiting to be uncrated and assembled, but no new pilots. Captain Jordan immediately set about getting the remnants of his squadron ready for combat, assuming they’d be striking back at the Japanese in the vicinity of Timor, or even New Guinea, which was now under threat. But it’s 1000 on 19 February 1942, in Darwin, Australia, and a massive air raid by Japanese carrier aircraft is inbound., the Japanese determined to reduce the threat from Australia to its landings in New Guinea. The Chickenhawks are down to 12 pilots and aircraft, but they scramble everyone, four pilots in three successive flights, rising to defend the myriad ships docked in the bay, nearly defenseless against the coming onslaught.


    The Chickenhawks on the prowl, from top to bottom:
    Chicken 02: 2nd Lt Beach
    Chicken 01: 1st Lt Kimble
    Chicken 03: 1st Lt Goode
    Chicken 04: 2nd Lt Daniel


    The Japanese 1st carrier strike, six D3A “Val” dive bombers escorted by two A6M “Zero” fighters.


    Lieutenant Beach is the fox in the henhouse, finding himself all by his lonesome with three Vals. To see how the fight went, please check the blog at:
    https://oldleadbreed.blogspot.com/2018/12/chickenhawks-in-darwin-1.html

    Next fight is the second flight of Warhawks, led by Captain Jordan, coming up to meet another group of Japanese bombers.

    V/R,
    Jack

    #106442

    Thomaston
    Participant

    Nice to see a change in bombers. How come there were only 2 A6Ms?

    Tired is enough.

    #106452
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    The Army Aircorp is finally getting with it!! They still need to go after the bombers, though.

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