Home Forums Modern Soviet SPG-9

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  • #61873
    Iain Fuller
    Participant

    I know this may sound like a daft question but it has been bugging me.

    How was this weapon moved? I know it could be trundled along by two men from it’s team but how was it brought onto the battlefield. I can’t see it being carried inside a BTR or BMP so was it towed behind them or porteed on a truck/APC (I’ve seen pics of this)?

    Like I said just been bugging me….

    #61890
    GeoffQRF
    Participant

    It’s quite small and folds down, so could be towed by a car like the Gaz or UAZ, or towed or slung in the back of a truck like the Gaz-66:

    Related image

    Image result for spg-9 carrier

    It could be fitted in the back of a jeep/truck

    Image result for spg-9

    Or just pulled by hand over shorter distances

    Image result for spg-9

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 4 months ago by GeoffQRF.

    QRF Models Limited
    www.quickreactionforce.co.uk

    #61892
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    I believe it was normally towed behind a BTR, with the gun crew inside. It had a two-wheel carriage for towing.

    Military history author
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    #61896
    GeoffQRF
    Participant

    I think the bigger ones, like the 82mm B-10 and 107mm B-11 were towed by the BTR (or a truck)

    QRF Models Limited
    www.quickreactionforce.co.uk

    #61897
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    The Anti-Tank Platoon of a Motor Rifle Battalion (BTR) had two of them, with each being allocated a BTR-60PB for transport.  Believe it or not, they were stuffed inside the BTRs.  That might seem a squeeze, but that was par for the course in the Soviet orbat – the other two squads of the AT Platoon each had to squeeze two AT-4 ‘Spigots’ inside their BTRs.  The SPG-9 was relatively lightweight – a little over 100lbs, so manageable between two or three soldiers.

    The two-wheeled trolley was designed for ease of manhandling – it was too small and flimsy for towing behind a vehicle.  There were no trailers authorised in the Anti-Tank Platoon TO&E, so that wasn’t an option either.  I’m also not sure that the BTR-60 was (officially) fitted with a tow-hook.

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #61898
    Russell Phillips
    Participant

    The Anti-Tank Platoon of a Motor Rifle Battalion (BTR) had two of them, with each being allocated a BTR-60PB for transport.

    I think I knew that, and knowing they had a wheeled carriage, assumed they were towed rather than carried inside. Thanks, it’s always good to get better information.

    Military history author
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    #61899
    Iain Fuller
    Participant

    Cheers JF, thanks for clearing that up. I thought it might be that but couldn’t quite get my head round it as it seems so impracticable hence wondering about it being towed/ported.

    Must be fun trying to get one out when under fire!

    #61907
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    They certainly liked to pack them in… 🙂

    I once tried getting seven teenagers with webbing and weapons (rubber AKs) in the back of a BMP at Shrivenham… I can only assume that the Soviets had a good supply of malnourished recruits…

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #61908
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    I imagine it was a lot easier with BTR-80 – at least that has doors on the side.

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

    #61909
    Mike
    Keymaster

    I lived in Shrivenham for a while.

    EDIT: Sorry, not relevant..

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 4 months ago by Mike. Reason: telling myself off
    #61921
    Jemima Fawr
    Participant

    Great place!  The only ‘museum’ I know that positively encourages you to climb on and in stuff. 🙂

    My wargames blog: http://www.jemimafawr.co.uk/

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