Home Forums General PC and Console Gaming Stop that train.

This topic contains 15 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Truls Engebakken-Fjell 4 weeks ago.

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #126312

    When you’re standing on a barrel of oil,  staring down a trian.

     

     

    Red Dead Redemption 2, looks real purdy on   a $3500 PC.

     

    #126329
    Darkest Star Games
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    I haven’t yet had the pleasure of playing either of the series, but I sure do want to.  Wonder if it is better on PC or PS4?

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #126348

    Far superior on PC, even with some of the trouble, it looks much better, and the controller on PS4 is just painful to use. So slow and it’s just a chore to shoot bad/good guys.

    Also just having the game in 60fps on PC vs 30fps on PS4 is worth it.

     

    I found a house with 4 brutally murdered people in it.

    So naturally, I took a selfy in their garden.

     

    #126353
    Darkest Star Games
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    Wow that is very nicely rendered!  I’ll have to check my specs and see if my putter will do it justice.

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #126358
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I’m perfectly happy with the console version, myself. In my childhood and teenage years I was an overzealous believer in the notion of “the PCMR” and “the console peasants” (though those exact terms didn’t exist yet) but frankly I’m just having a more fun time with consoles these days.

    RDR2 is an amazing game. I’m burned out on it at the time being, though. I’ve realised I’ve missed some early-game content because I didn’t visit some locations soon or often enough (mainly the under-construction homestead near Valentine and the logging camp near Strawberry, that I know of), so at some point I’m going to have to do a second playthrough and use a walkthrough or a wiki to make sure I miss no windows of opportunity for any side-missions or scripted, non-recurring events. It’s a daunting thought, so I’m cooling off with some other games until I feel the urge to get back to RDR2 again. I’ve put a lot of time into my first playthrough and am not even halfway through it yet. Maybe I’ll just drop it and start a new game, though I’ve gotten very attached to “this” Arthur Morgan and don’t want to reset him to “factory settings”.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by Rhoderic Rhoderic.
    #126366

    I’m perfectly happy with the console version, myself. In my childhood and teenage years I was an overzealous believer in the notion of “the PCMR” and “the console peasants” (though those exact terms didn’t exist yet) but frankly I’m just having a more fun time with consoles these days. RDR2 is an amazing game. I’m burned out on it at the time being, though. I’ve realised I’ve missed some early-game content because I didn’t visit some locations soon or often enough (mainly the under-construction homestead near Valentine and the logging camp near Strawberry, that I know of), so at some point I’m going to have to do a second playthrough and use a walkthrough or a wiki to make sure I miss no windows of opportunity for any side-missions or scripted, non-recurring events. It’s a daunting thought, so I’m cooling off with some other games until I feel the urge to get back to RDR2 again. I’ve put a lot of time into my first playthrough and am not even halfway through it yet. Maybe I’ll just drop it and start a new game, though I’ve gotten very attached to “this” Arthur Morgan and don’t want to reset him to “factory settings”.

     

    Arthur is one of the greatest Game characters.

    Had he been in a movie,  there would be talk of Oscars.

    I’m not going to spoil how it goes with him.

     

    I have a monster PC, so I play with almost everything on max, on a 1440p resolution.

    I hope to crank it all to max, once the game is better optimised.

     

     

     

    #126367
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Arthur is one of the greatest Game characters. Had he been in a movie, there would be talk of Oscars. I’m not going to spoil how it goes with him.

    I have an inkling. As this game is a modern classic already, there’s enough buzz about it that spoilers have become unavoidable. I expect the point will come pretty soon when people will be saying “You had your chance, if you didn’t want it spoiled, why didn’t you play it sooner?”.

    I’ve yet to try online mode at all. From what I’ve heard, it was lackluster at first but they’ve been adding enough new content to it that it’s quite good now.

    BTW, one thing I really enjoy about this game is the way it dispenses with accurate geography and history, so it can (im)properly treat the Old West as the “world of adventure” it has become in the public imagination. It reminds me of the fun parts of season 1 of Westworld that way. I want to do my Old West miniatures skirmish gaming project in the same vein. I may use the RDR2 gameworld as a basis for that, even. Ambarino, New Hanover, Lemoyne, West Elizabeth and New Austin are good names for fictional states/territories.

    #126394

    Arthur is one of the greatest Game characters. Had he been in a movie, there would be talk of Oscars. I’m not going to spoil how it goes with him.

    I have an inkling. As this game is a modern classic already, there’s enough buzz about it that spoilers have become unavoidable. I expect the point will come pretty soon when people will be saying “You had your chance, if you didn’t want it spoiled, why didn’t you play it sooner?”. I’ve yet to try online mode at all. From what I’ve heard, it was lackluster at first but they’ve been adding enough new content to it that it’s quite good now. BTW, one thing I really enjoy about this game is the way it dispenses with accurate geography and history, so it can (im)properly treat the Old West as the “world of adventure” it has become in the public imagination. It reminds me of the fun parts of season 1 of Westworld that way. I want to do my Old West miniatures skirmish gaming project in the same vein. I may use the RDR2 gameworld as a basis for that, even. Ambarino, New Hanover, Lemoyne, West Elizabeth and New Austin are good names for fictional states/territories.

     

    I’ve tried Online for an hour, so far very boring, might get better, but it’s been empty most of the time for me, not many other playing.

    I didn’t bother playing online when I had it on the PS4, because of the controllers.

    I’m on the fence about the fake names, as it feels very GTA, and I find GTA silly. RDR 2 is a more serious down to earth game so I would have prefered real names. Also, I can’t remember the fake names, so I just call it Louisiana, New Orleans, Dakota etc.

    #126401

    Thomaston
    Participant

    I just watched a review of this game last night and it looks very good. I like open world gameplay and horse riding, this fills both.
    I thought this had been out months ago or an online version so I’m a little confused.

    Tired is enough.

    #126407

    I just watched a review of this game last night and it looks very good. I like open world gameplay and horse riding, this fills both. I thought this had been out months ago or an online version so I’m a little confused.

     

    It came out on ps4 and xbox one almost exactly a year ago. It’s just been released on PC.

    #126412
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    I’m on the fence about the fake names, as it feels very GTA, and I find GTA silly. RDR 2 is a more serious down to earth game so I would have prefered real names. Also, I can’t remember the fake names, so I just call it Louisiana, New Orleans, Dakota etc.

    I guess I’m fond of the way they made a game set in “real world history” and were still able to have it be a world-building exercise like a fantasy game. Best of both worlds. I would have found it constraining had they tried to pin the geography down to the real American West, Midwest and South. Similarly, I’d sooner have the fuzzy anachronisms than have the game be faithful to the exact point in time it’s set in.

     

    I just watched a review of this game last night and it looks very good. I like open world gameplay and horse riding, this fills both. I thought this had been out months ago or an online version so I’m a little confused.

    The horse-riding is very well designed in RDR2, I must say. It’s a deeper, more involved activity than its counterpart in most other games. Really makes you feel like you’re playing a western. I like open worlds in video games, too, and this must be one of the best ever made. Do be prepared for that you’re going to miss some content because of the open world, though. There are limited windows of opportunity for various minor bits of side-story scattered about the gameworld, which aren’t marked on the map. It’s a mammoth game that invites you to play it twice or more if you’re of the completionist persuasion.

    #126413
    Darkest Star Games
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    I have really enjoyed playing Kingdom Come: Deliverance, which is semi-open world (and a lot smaller in geographic scale) which also has a lot of horse riding as well as a good story.  It’s worth a play as well, though I understand RDR2 far outweighs it in scope.

    Is it necessary to play RDR1 before starting RDR2?  Is anything missed?

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #126415
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Is it necessary to play RDR1 before starting RDR2?

    I haven’t. I only returned to video gaming actively about a year ago, after a many-year hiatus that began before RDR1 even came out. RDR2 is sort of a prequel in the sense that it’s set earlier in time. I’m sure I’m missing the significance of some elements of the story in RDR2 (characters that also appear in RDR1, but under changed circumstances) but it’s no impediment to playing the game, really. It might help to have some vague idea of what RDR1 is about, though. That’s not terribly difficult given that, again, it’s such a cult game that coming across spoilers is almost inevitable. I hope to get around to RDR1 at some point after finishing RDR2. Part of the gameworld is the same, though it’s much expanded in RDR2.

    #126417

    I’ve played both (I brought a PS3 just to play RDR1, it never came to the PC)

    The only thing you get by Playing RDR1 before RDR2, is you generally know how it ends,  not the finer details,  but, but given the main story in RDR1 is directly related to the end of the second game. You kinda know how some stuff will go.

    If you want to play RDR1, you should do it before RDR2, not because of the story. But the game will feel small, and lesser next to RDR2.  The  map is far smaller (in fact,  the entire RDR1 map is in RDR2(except for Mexico) but you are rarely in that part of the map in RDR2.

     

    RDR1 is a good game,  and the actual shooting isn’t that bad. And it’s set in 1917, so you get the whole wild bunch vibe with the Mexican revolution.

    But it’s quite  empty, far less to do next to RDR2. It’s also more like GTA, more silly characters,  several obligatory horse racing missions.

    You don’t play the same character in the games,  but the character you play in RDR1 an important character in RDR2. And they used the same actor,  which is good as he has quite a characteristic voice.

    #126434
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    If you want to play RDR1, you should do it before RDR2, not because of the story. But the game will feel small, and lesser next to RDR2.

    Personally I’m not terribly concerned. RDR1 will feel lesser, yes, but it’s still big enough of an undertaking that it would have delayed my being able to start RDR2 very substantially. Better to have RDR2 at the head of the queue while it’s still new-ish, I think. It’s one of those things where it’s best to experience the cultural phenomenon as and when it’s happening (even if the game will probably age well, and be a classic forevermore). In the meantime I can let RDR1 accumulate a bit more “vintage” status, so that when I finally get around to play it, it’ll feel more like a slice of video gaming history, which has a worth of its own. The stage at which I’d feel least inclined to play RDR2 is when it’s too old to still be “the hotness”, but not old enough to be “vintage” just yet.

    #126435

    If you have a PS4 the best way to get RDR1 is with the PlayStation now thing.

     

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.