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  • #57811
    Howard Whitehouse
    Participant

    I’d like some suggestions; this may be a bit long, but you’ll see why.

    The party goes through a door and finds itself in a hexagonal room, probably twelve or fifteen paces across, with a large and ornate mirror (set fairly low down) on each wall. In the middle of the room is a round table, with a tablet inscribed with instructions to all who enter.

    Turning around, the visitors notice that the door by which they came in is also an identical mirror.

    This is a set up for a self-contained adventure (probably a convention game, using simplified rules) where our bold heroes pass through each mirror in turn to find themselves in a completely different scene, in place and possibly time. They must accomplish something – maybe fighting, maybe bargaining or trickery – and return to the main Hall of Mirrors prior to approaching the next mirror. Leaving the scene by any other exit takes the figure out of the game.

    Here’s what I’d like suggestions on. The main hall is based on a 7” hexagonal paper mache box with dollhouse miniature mirrors. Each external face of the hexagon leads on to each scene, which can vary in size, but must still be a model that can be pulled out of a box and placed in position at the moment the players announce they are climbing through the mirror. So, a cavern, small temple, tomb or stone circle all work, a broad vista of the Serengeti plain does not. Since it’s a Sword and Sorcery setting, the scenes must suit that genre. Ideas?

    I do all my own stunts.

    #57813
    Stroezie
    Participant

    While I love TWW I don’t think this is the forum to ask. Try this Dmscraft even if you just browse a little you’re bound to find tons of great idea’s for Rpg plus they are a real friendly community.

    If you like small scale skirmish, check out http://planetares6.blogspot.be/?m=0

    #57817
    shelldrake
    Participant

    I get where you are coming from, and asking here seems right to me.

    What you are suggesting is a game where each time a figure is moved from one room to the other it is basically like entering a new dimension in either space/time or what ever.

    It mightbe easier to work if you had either a large scene in your box – i.e. a warehouse, or a scene with a few smaller rooms leading from the main one.

    A pulp wargame could work well for this concept as well as a dungeon crawl game.

     

    Maybe start in a tavern (all good fantasy games start in a tavern….) then maybe a pit fight scene, a dungeon (as in locked up in a dungeon), followed by a room with corridors needing skill checks to avoid traps, next a fight in a wizard’s chamber to gain an amulet and then a final scene in a throne room.

     

    #57818
    Stroezie
    Participant

    Come to think of it I seem to remember something about an old Dungeon magazine adventure which was basically the dungeon crawl olympics for teams of the classic warrior,mage,thief and cleric lineup.
    It had a number of mini adventures which played to the various classes strengths and teams scored points on how long it took them to solve each task.
    At least that’s how I remember it( not always the most reliable source of information mind you)

    I’ll have a look through my archives if you’re interested.

    If you like small scale skirmish, check out http://planetares6.blogspot.be/?m=0

    #57819
    warwell
    Participant

    The throne room of  legendary king, emperor, or tyrant. They arrive when he is alive and kicking. They need to steal his crown, sword, or other macguffin in order to escape.

    The bridge of  starship overrun by out-of-control robots. Help the crew retake control of the bridge.

    #57823
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Some thoughts:

    1. Only one mirror/portal works at a time, each mini-dungeon is a quest to find the ring/ amulet/ gem / puzzle piece / Door-knocker of Ineffable Wisdom (take your pick 🙂 ) that unlocks the next portal and which must be placed in the correct position on the table.

    2. Optionally, make a full size version of the object on the table and hand them puzzle pieces when they complete a mini-quest.

    3. Each quest should give prominence to a different character but involve all the rest.

    3.1 – Initial quest involves the group fighting low level monsters (rats are the traditional enemy here) that any of the group can tackle to introduce the game mechanics.
    3.2 – Perhaps a cavern or room that’s pitch dark and filled with traps. One character needs to provide light (light spell / lantern / vial of glowing stuff provided by an Elf queen) while the thief/ rogue disarms the traps. Occasional rats/ spiders appear that the rest of the party need to dispose of.
    3.3 – Lair of the Beast – a major monster must be defeated. The beast has a deadly attack of some sort (fire breathing say) which will damage party members badly but fortunately the fighter type has a defence (The Asbestos Underpants of the Dark God or some such Mcguffin). While the fighter slays the beast the rest of the party must deal with the beasts numerous, but much less deadly offspring lest they overwhelm the fighter. Search the beast’s corpse for the puzzle piece.
    3.4 – It’s a kind of Magic – an elemental/ daemonic/undead entity that can only be damaged by magic (spells/ enchanted weapons/ divine intervention) must be defeated. Time for the mage to step up to the plate. From time to time the entity raises some of the skeletons of those who have perished here before to assist it. Cue rest of party. The banished entity leaves the puzzle piece in it’s ashes.
    3.5 – Get Off My Land! – Stalactites fall from the ceiling, gouts of flame spurt from the floor, the ground shakes, the very air is poisonous. Random party members take damage and the party healer must keep them alive (or sacrifice some for the good of the party? Decisions, decisions!) The puzzle piece is at the far side, next to a mirror that leads back to the centre.
    3.6 – The Heart Of Darkness – The giant, beating heart of the Great Daemon Zzargle’flahrn is here and must be destroyed to save the world itself from destruction! Daemon hearts are not easily destroyed and the party must beat off waves of opponents while steadily destroying the heart.

    Make a D6 roll every turn
    1 – Heart may not be damaged this turn
    2 – Heart recovers minor amounts of damage this turn
    3 – Heart is immune to magic this turn
    4 – Heart is immune to non-magical attacks this turn
    5 – Heart takes 50% (round up) extra damage from attacks this turn
    6 – Heart takes double damage from attacks this turn

    Each mini-quest should reward the party with things they’ll find useful in the next.

    Any of that of any use at all?

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    #57825
    Howard Whitehouse
    Participant

    I get where you are coming from, and asking here seems right to me. What you are suggesting is a game where each time a figure is moved from one room to the other it is basically like entering a new dimension in either space/time or what ever. It mightbe easier to work if you had either a large scene in your box – i.e. a warehouse, or a scene with a few smaller rooms leading from the main one. A pulp wargame could work well for this concept as well as a dungeon crawl game. Maybe start in a tavern (all good fantasy games start in a tavern….) then maybe a pit fight scene, a dungeon (as in locked up in a dungeon), followed by a room with corridors needing skill checks to avoid traps, next a fight in a wizard’s chamber to gain an amulet and then a final scene in a throne room.

    Some great ideas there! Each scene has to be be self-contained and compact enough that it can be placed on the table connected to the side of the hexagonal central hall as possible. My current plan, as it develops, is to order several of the boxes (they are cheap) and cut them in half so that I can butt the half piece against the central hex as a sort of ‘pathway’, terrained as a bridge or trail or garden path that leads to the ‘movie set’.

    Since the object of having five short  scenes that are essentially short one-off games is to prepare for the big finale, there has to be a reason for each scene. For example, it might be –
    1) Break the ace lock-picker out of a cell. Try not to let thirty of his grubby cellmates back into the Hall of Mirrors with you.

    2) Have the lock-picker break into a treasure room. Steal the amulet.  Fight  guards as needed.

    3)  Trade the amulet for the amazing magic sword with a dodgy character in a seedy tavern. A fight breaks out when one of your party is alleged to have spilled the beer of the nastiest customer, who has his nine best mates with him. Get out with the sword and all your friends.

    4) Cross the Bridge of Death through the Forest of Death, fighting off the Crocodile of Death and all the angry  pygmies.

    5) Big finale in the throne room / evil temple / ancient tomb (etc) in which the amazing magic sword is really, really useful against a foe who would otherwise slice you like birthday cake.
    You could, of course, avoid steps 1-4,  go to the big finale, and lose badly.

    I do all my own stunts.

    #57841
    shelldrake
    Participant

    I have always wanted to use a box file (I think those are the names) to play a wargame in – remove the bits inside the box and turn it in to a complete scene.

    By gluing doors in the same place on various boxes, you can link them together to form larger gaming areas.

     

     

    Great for storage too.

     

    #57843
    Howard Whitehouse
    Participant

    I use a  lot of boxes – mostly the kind of gift-grade boxes that use a good quality cardboard or paper mache – as ‘dungeon’ rooms.

    I do all my own stunts.

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