Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #46694
    Howard Whitehouse
    Participant

    Reading up on the uniforms of British volunteer units of the Victorian era (as one does) and found this:

    “After the Boer War, the Bucks Hussars took up slouch hats and khaki frocks with red collars. After 1908 they wore the invisible green frock.”

    I do all my own stunts.

    #46697
    McKinstry
    Participant

    So, what Vallejo color would you recommend for invisible green?

    Never wrestle with a pig. You both get muddy and the pig just likes it.

    #46699
    Howard Whitehouse
    Participant

    Dammit Bob, that’s why I came here to ask?

    Years ago I bought a jar of Polly S Phthalo Blue. It was essentially translucent, and not what I needed for, say, French infantry at all. Because I didn’t know that this was the key feature of phthalo blue. I just assumed that a phthalo was some sort of D&D creature I was unfamiliar with. After all, I’d painted my British colonials with the paint that company had named ‘Bugbear Fur.’

    I do all my own stunts.

    #46701
    McKinstry
    Participant

    Well, a surprisingly large number of my WW1 & 2 Warships have decks of skeleton bone which also supplied a large number of 10mm Gallic blonde hair. I also have an alarmingly large number of 6mm Sassanid cataphracts that owe their color allegiance to various Privateer Press faction colors such as Trollblood or Khador.

    I think Phthalo is an ancient Hellenic naughty word involving a fish, an amphorae of cheap wine and a lost weekend on Delphi.

     

    Never wrestle with a pig. You both get muddy and the pig just likes it.

    #46702
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    I have no idea but it is funny.

    #46710
    craig cartmell
    Participant
    phthalo|cyan¦ine

    [ˌ(f)θaləʊˈsʌɪəniːn]

    NOUN
    1. chemistry
      a greenish-blue crystalline dye of the porphyrin group.
    2. any of a large class of green or blue pigments and dyes which are chelate complexes of phthalocyanine or one of its derivatives with a metal (in particular, copper).
      “phthalocyanine blue”

    Cheers,
    Craig

    The Ministry of Gentlemanly Warfare

    #46715
    Kaptain Kobold
    Participant

    I’m up for a unit that wears frocks, invisible green, khaki or otherwise. Where do I sign up? 

    #46717
    Angel Barracks
    Moderator

    Well, a surprisingly large number of my WW1 & 2 Warships have decks of skeleton bone

    Ack reminds me of a time (oooh yay a tale of tedium recounted by someone inept at making dull stories undull) when I was selling paints and a chap picked up a bottle of grey, studied the bottom of it to see the colour, proclaimed it was perfect for his ships and asked for a number of bottles.
    That was until he saw it was called wolf grey, at which point it was just some fantasy paint and was not perfect after all.

    Anyhow, below is a square of red colour with a large circle on it, in invisible green:

    #46723
    PatG
    Participant

    Matching colours is a fool’s errand. Even with modern paint and dye chemistry, there can be a huge variation in “standard” colours due to different lots and fading. It gets a lot worse as you go back in history. As a re-enactor and wargamer one of my pet peeves is that units in both are uniformly equipped with kit of identical colour and no with mending or patches.

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