Home Forums Terrain and Scenery Using Hexes for Linear warfare?

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  • #102740
    JozisTinMan
    Participant

    Fishing for opinions, has anyone done this?  (I am sure someone has)

    See: https://jozistinman.blogspot.com/2018/10/orienting-hexes-for-linear-warfare.html

     

    http://jozistinman.blogspot.com/

    #102749
    MartinR
    Participant

    Command and Colours Ancients models linear warfare on hexes, so yes, it is perfectly feasible.

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #102753
    warwell
    Participant

    Much like The Portable Wargame, I use square grids for linear warfare. However, if I had to choose a hex pattern itwould be against the grain. I like being able to form a continuous line. IIRC, Battle Cry uses an against the grain pattern and the games work out fine.

    #102754
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    I posted a reply on your blog, but there’s no catch-all elegant solution to this.

    When using grids for wargaming, most people think only about counting distances on the grid (e.g. the never-ending discussion on how to count a diagonal move on square grid). But there is more at stake. What you need is (see also my blogpost http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/2018/07/grids-and-miniature-wargaming-never.html):

    • A movement procedure for miniatures or units on the grid
    • A procedure for determining shooting ranges
    • A way to orient miniatures or units relative to the orientation of the grid
    • Align units to adjacent gridcells, such that we can make linear battlelines.

    Especially the latter is an often ignored problem.

    The core of the problem is that when you discretize space into hexes or squares or other shapes, you often discretize orientations as well (e.g. units have to be aligned to the edges, or the corners, of a cell – not only their front, but also their flanks). If such orientations of both front and flanks are not matched to how adjacent cells are connected (as is the case in a hexgrid, but not in a square grid), there is never an elegant solution. One way to solve this is to decouple the line of hexes and the visual line of units, such that the units look like a line, but the hexes are still staggered.

    My advice: if the linear alignment of units is really important to how you want the game to work, don;t use a hexgrid. Use a square grid, or try something experimental and use a triangular grid (http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/2018/08/triangular-grids.html).

     

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #102755
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    BTW, it’s interesting to see how the orientation of the hexgrid is chosen in many of the classic hex-and-counter wargames, often, it is oriented such that the natural frontline in the game is following a zig-zag line of hexes, instead of a straight line of hexes. This then results in “bulges” in the frontline, which makes it easier for attacking in the rules framework of zones-of-control and every-adjacent-enemy-unit-must-be-attacked and preferably having 2-1 or 3-1 attack ratios. Otherwise, you would have to attack an almost continuous line of units, stopping at some point with a hex that has to attack 2 adjacent enemy hexes.

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

    #102756
    Andrew Rolph
    Participant

    BTW, it’s interesting to see how the orientation of the hexgrid is chosen in many of the classic hex-and-counter wargames…

    Are you telling me the Russian countryside doesn’t have a naturally occurring hex grid?!

    Lied to, dammit, from the age of 13…

    Cheers

    Andrew

    #102785
    JozisTinMan
    Participant

    Thanks guys! Phil, I am going to digest your blog post tonight.

    Andrew, that is hilarious!

    http://jozistinman.blogspot.com/

    #102824
    JozisTinMan
    Participant

    Phil, fascinating work on your blog, I am slowly working through all of your articles.

    The proof of the pudding is of course in the eating, so I shall run some small scenarios with “hexing” my rules and seeing how they turn out.

    I have posted my latest experimental QRS HERE if anyone is interested.

    I’ll post results

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by JozisTinMan.

    http://jozistinman.blogspot.com/

    #102851
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    Phil, fascinating work on your blog, I am slowly working through all of your articles.

    thanks, glad you like it.

     

    Tiny Tin Men Blog: http://snv-ttm.blogspot.com/
    Wargaming Mechanics Blog: http://wargaming-mechanics.blogspot.com/

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