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  • #74107

    Even though I live in paradise, the weather intrudes upon my gaming hobby.

    For example, Summer might have 14-21 straight days of temperature unremittingly in the high 30s or into the 40s (c) which makes painting a little difficult as it can dry on your brush between dipping & applying it to a figure.

    At the moment, in Spring in the Antipodes, we’re experiencing our 4th straight day of rain which is unusual at most times & very odd for early Spring (thunderstorms, cyclones, floods: sure. But rain?!?!?). This has slowed down drying time amazingly. Although it’s 21 (c), the humidity means the old hills I’m renovating are taking an inordinate amount of time. I re-flocked one on Saturday. It was fairly dry by Sunday so I did my usual soak of watered PVA via a squirt bottle on Monday & its still very damp. The whole process usually takes place in a day.

    How does your weather effect your hobby?

     

    donald

    #74109
    curlerman
    Participant

    Even though I live in paradise, the weather intrudes upon my gaming hobby. For example, Summer might have 14-21 straight days of temperature unremittingly in the high 30s or into the 40s (c) which makes painting a little difficult as it can dry on your brush between dipping & applying it to a figure. 

    I live on the coast in Spain and can relate directly to this problem. My semi solution to the problem was to transfer all my paints to dropper bottles which extended the life of the paint by a huge time and I haven’t thrown a dried up paint pot away in the last 5 years. The second thing was to use a wet pallette. a drip of paint from a dropper bottle can often stay workable for 24 hours using the two combined.  Furthermore the coastal humidity led me to abandon spray undercoating and varnishing a long time ago.

     

    Winning is not important but losing i just can't handle..
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    #74118
    willz
    Participant

    I live in Devon and tend to do any scenery building between April and September (this is also the period I have to do house decorating as well) as generally we get dry sunny days at regular times during that period.  Doing scenery building (lots of PVA is used in construction) at any other time means it takes longer for them to dry, most scenery will dry out in the sun in 6 hours or less.

    #74125
    Steve Johnson
    Participant

    If the weather is nice, I tend to spend as much time as possible outdoors. When the weather is wet and windy, then I find more motivation to paint, model etc.

    #74131

    Daily weather doesn’t affect me too much because my painting/modeling sessions are rather infrequent. There’s always enough time for drying. I gave up aerosols years ago so cloudy spray finishes are not an issue. Seasonal changes, however, are a different matter. My hobby space has always been in a basement area with poor heating. So during the winter months I cut down substantially because I can’t spend long periods of time down there–bbbrrrrr. The upside is that during hot humid summers I spend a lot more time down there where it’s comfortable.

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #74150
    MartinR
    Participant

    The weather doesn’t affect me so much as the day length. I tend to get a lot more painting done in summer when the days are long, than winter when the days are achingly short and I have lots of ‘other stuff to do’ in the hours of daylight. All the figure prep, especially the spray painting, is much easier in spring/summer/autumn too. Not much fun trekking up the garage in pitch black pelting rain with a box of figures.

    Winter is time for playing computer games.

     

     

     

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #74163
    McKinstry
    Participant

    With rare exceptions the weather in Colorado is usually one of low humidity regardless of temperature. The only time I may have to wait on spraying a varnish or primer is in late June to early August, our monsoon season.

    The occasional 24+” snowfall is simply an opportunity to paint more.

     

    The tree of Life is self pruning.

    #74168
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I live on the Atlantic coast of North America, and it can be impossibly humid for long stretches, regardless of temperature. In the winter, cold and humid can really crack your teeth, let me tell you. It can also render spray priming impossible for weeks at a time, which is a real drag. Spring and early autumn tend to be priming season; other times of year are just no good.

    #74181
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    See Below

    (double post)

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by Guy Farrish.
    #74182
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    I live in Wales.

    #74186

    So you use a ‘wet palette’ technique with your painting, Guy?

     

    donald

    #74189
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    Yep, so do we.

    #74191
    Etranger
    Participant

      Tough here today ….

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by Etranger.
    #74193

    It gets too hot here to paint at times in summer – paint dries as quick as a flash on the brush.

    #74440
    Cerdic
    Participant

    I have a shed at the bottom of my garden that I use for painting and stuff. It has heat and lighting so I can use it all year round.

    I live in SE England – the warmest part of Britain!

    #74459
    Grimheart
    Participant

    If the weather is nice, I tend to spend as much time as possible outdoors. When the weather is wet and windy, then I find more motivation to paint, model etc.

    Pretty much this for me as well.

    Interest include 6mm WW2, 6mm SciFi, 30mm Old West, DropFleet, Warlords Exterminate and others!

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