Home Forums General General What makes you want to ragequit the hobby (or a project)?

This topic contains 67 replies, has 33 voices, and was last updated by Not Connard Sage Not Connard Sage 6 days, 16 hours ago.

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  • #101893
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    Obviously you haven’t ragequit the hobby permanently if you’re still hanging around forums like this, but I suspect I’m not the only one to have had to put up with annoyances that have brought one close to ragequitting, or made one do it for a while before returning. For that matter, I’m sure there are quite a few specific projects that have been permanently ragequit by hobbyists over the years, even when said hobbyists haven’t quit the hobby altogether.

    So, what are your reasons for wanting, or having wanted, to ragequit the hobby, or a specific project within the hobby?

    For me, there’s one big thing that’s taking much of my patience not to complain about more often: I order stuff from reputable vendors, and either it never arrives, or the vendor made some mistake packing the order. So I have to spend a lot of the time and energy I’m setting aside for my hobby endeavours on simply chasing up stuff I’ve ordered and paid for but haven’t received. My enthusiasm is lost in the weeks or months that pass in the meantime. I find the whole thing mentally and spiritually exhausting (not least because I’m constantly put in the position of having to impose myself on vendors who are themselves often giving off signals that they’re barely coping with the workload and expenses), and the whole hobby sometimes leaves a bitter taste in my mouth because of it.

    I almost can’t believe how often it happens to me that a reputable vendor makes a mistake packing my order or loses track of the fact that I had made the order entirely*. Especially when I get to comparing experiences with other hobbyists, I feel like I’m cursed. For some reason it seems to happen to me much, much more often than it happens to other people. My writing this post was brought on by the embittering reminder that I need to contact some vendors again. I’ve been putting it off for months because it really does give me angst.

    Anyway, enough about that. Returning to the question, what makes you want to ragequit?

     

    *  On one or two occasions, it might have been the case that a parcel was lost in the post, but I can’t be sure of that, and I do know that on many other occasions when the parcel never arrived, it was the vendor that slipped up. I know that, because on those occasions it became clear that the parcels were never sent after I put time and effort into communicating with the vendors in question. Keep in mind, I know that some vendors regularly take a month or longer to process an order, so to be fair I always wait several months before getting in touch for the first time about a parcel that’s never arrived.

    #101895
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    Endless internet squabbles about ‘history’. Or more accurately, the endless internet squabbles about historical minutiae that no real historian is interested in. I’m sure I don’t need to elaborate.

    Go and read an Osprey instead FFS. If you’re still not satisfied, write your bloody own.

     

    And people who use portmanteau words like ‘ragequit’… 🙂

     

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #101896
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    And people who use portmanteau words like ‘ragequit’…

    I did suspect someone would say that, and I did suspect that someone would be you…

    Anyway, “Ragequit” is a compound, not a portmanteau 

    #101897
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    And people who use portmanteau words like ‘ragequit’…

    I did suspect someone would say that, and I did suspect that someone would be you… Anyway, “Ragequit” is a compound, not a portmanteau

    I beg your pardon, you are indeed correct. I blame a lack of relaxants for my error. Steps will be taken to remedy this lack soon.

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #101899
    Ruarigh
    Ruarigh
    Participant

    Endless internet squabbles about ‘history’.

    I’ve never ragequit wargaming or even come close, but the squabbles and posturing on some forums have led to me quitting those forums. Not sure if it’s rage or just a deep weariness at the arrogance of some people, but I am just too old to be dealing with some people’s crap. It doesn’t help when people Vikingsplain at me, and I have to work at reminding myself that they have no idea who I am or what my expertise is, and vice versa. We’re all substantially anonymous on these forums, and need to take that into account, but it can be difficult and trying at times.

    On the other hand, I have occasionally very nearly quit wargaming due to a deep-seated ennui and a sense of purposelessness when faced with multiple projects and no time to in which to attend to any of them. That, more than rage, is my main motivation for clearing all the gaming stuff out.

    Never argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    https://emidsvikings.ac.uk/
    #101900
    Not Connard Sage
    Not Connard Sage
    Participant

    On the other hand, I have occasionally very nearly quit wargaming due to a deep-seated ennui and a sense of purposelessness when faced with multiple projects and no time to in which to attend to any of them. That, more than rage, is my main motivation for clearing all the gaming stuff out.

    I think that is true of any hobby though isn’t it?

    "I go online sometimes, but everyone's spelling is really bad. It's... depressing."

    #101902

    Thomaston
    Participant

    I did ragequit Games Workshop’s hobby because I didn’t agree with their business model.

    Life's too long.

    #101903
    Darkest Star Games
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    I didn’t ragequit playing competitive tournament style/based games, but I did quit them.  Found myself unwilling to put up with the power gaming, shenanigans and general whining the majority of the participants are into.  Got zero enjoyment from the scene.

     

    I have also ragequit specific gaming projects, either due to fiddly model issues or my “project mates” dropping out and leaving me holding the bag.  Most have just been shelved for later de-hibernation, but I fully exited 2 projects, selling off everything to do with them.

     

    I will never quit gaming as a whole.

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #101905

    Tim Snoddy
    Participant

    I too quit the local competitive tournament scene for Ancient and Medieval gaming after realising those who were doing well were not using better tactics but better at exploiting the loop holes in the rules.  If I am honest it was also because it was gutting to put a long time into preparing and practicing for a competition (not to mention the cost of travel etc) only to lose badly due to poor luck.

    I regularly despair about various aspects of the hobby.  The multitude of systems being a blessing and a curse.  Gamers around me flitting between systems without really giving anything a decent run out.  One of the aspects of a game that makes it fun for me is that both sides have a fairly equal chance of winning.  Games with super duper unstoppable pay to win latest releases or pull the number out of the air for no discernible reason points systems lose my interest in short order.

    #101907

    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I’ll add my voice to the litany of being bummed out by tournaments, min-maxing, and Super Kill-Guy, Perfect Tactic Of The Week, and Pay-to-Win games as major turn-offs to the hobby. Card games and card-driven games seem very susceptible to this with only very few exceptions. Any game that has “I Automagically Win and You Can’t Stop Me” cards you can play is likely to make me not feel like playing it again.

    Other turn-offs include people talking about how sublime their games are when a I have made it clear that I don’t care for them, which usually tends towards “You don’t get it, you’re just a bad player” arguments, which are both irritating and insulting, and makes me want to play even less. Use of the word “butthurt” likewise – instantly goes on my never play list. All of the above happened with Netrunner, as I recall. Total turn off and I haven’t played, or even tried to play, since.

    Yet I do like games where you can be losing yet feel like you’re giving it a strong showing. Horizon Wars is one of these – it’s always worth taking a bold move even if you’re on the defensive, and you can pull out of the fire even in very dire situations. Dirtside II has this as well. I like games that make both attacker and defender feel very active, instead of one side or the other just waiting for your chance to be slaughtered.

    #101910
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    Nothing.

    Some things irritate, even annoy me, self identified historians who try and bully and browbeat others make me want to gently punch them in the face , but not quit wargaming.

    All of which (well some of it) may make me sound as if I am a calm, quiet, pacific individual  – I’m not.

    But its a game innit?

    I don’t like some types of wargaming and gamer but I just avoid them.

    I’m not going to give something up because there are people or things I dislike in it – I’d have ended it all (not just wargaming) years ago if that were the case.

    #101912
    Mike Headden
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Can’t say anything has made me ragequit, though many competing interests have caused activity in the hobby to fluctuate wildly. Currently very involved in Elder Scrolls Online so tabletop wargaming is just puttering in the background.

    My wargaming interests are so eclectic and my range of scales and periods so varied I doubt any company would notice if I “ragequit.” I tend to avoid 28/32mm scale stuff these days, GW in particular, but that has more to do with the mountain of unpainted lead in the scale and an increasing preference for games with small scale figures (and lots of them) over ones with a dozen super detailed ones. Ironic given the decline in my eyesight and the shakiness of my paws 🙂

    I’ve enjoyed all the competitions I’ve been in.

    I don’t need games to be fair, just to be fun.

    I’ve had excellent service from almost every vendor and even the occasional hiccup with orders has been at most a minor inconvenience and most often a matter of no significance at all, swiftly resolved.

    I enjoy my hobby as much as ever and am grateful for places like this where, even if there’s a lull in action on the tabletop, I can keep up with my fellow hobbyists.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    #101913
    Ruarigh
    Ruarigh
    Participant

    On the other hand, I have occasionally very nearly quit wargaming due to a deep-seated ennui and a sense of purposelessness when faced with multiple projects and no time to in which to attend to any of them.

    I think that is true of any hobby though isn’t it?

    I suspect you are right.

    Never argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    https://emidsvikings.ac.uk/
    #101914
    Ivan Sorensen
    Ivan Sorensen
    Moderator

    I quit a particular forum with rather explosive consequences 😀

    Other than that, if I start feeling like I am making excuses not to work on a miniatures squad or something, I put it away and go do something else.

    I don’t think I’ve ever felt like quitting the hobby as a whole, but I do go through periods where I focus more on miniatures or more on board games or RPG’s.

    Nordic Weasel Games
    https://sites.google.com/site/nordicweaselgames/

    #101918
    kyoteblue
    kyoteblue
    Participant

    Like Ivan, I ragequit a certain Forum. But not gaming.

    #101926

    Thomaston
    Participant

    Sounds like THIS forum is a refuge for people who left the OTHER forum.

    Life's too long.

    #101927
    Mike
    Mike
    Keymaster

    I ragequit a certain Forum

    #101928
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    On the other hand, I have occasionally very nearly quit wargaming due to a deep-seated ennui and a sense of purposelessness when faced with multiple projects and no time to in which to attend to any of them. That, more than rage, is my main motivation for clearing all the gaming stuff out.

    I kind of recognise this feeling, but not exactly as you describe it. I do get that ennui and sense of purposelessness when I look back at my achievements in regard to painting and modelling and am forced to face up to the fact that I’ve progressed at a fraction of the pace I’d been hoping to. But it’s not so much because of a lack of time, as because of having to sit on my hands and wait due to practical obstacles on most of the occasions when I’m overflowing with enthusiasm and inspiration to be cracking on. By the time those obstacles are out of the way (like when I’ve finally got the miniatures/paints/tools/materials I need in situ, much later than I thought I’d have them), I often feel tired and bitter.

    That’s perhaps the main reason I see myself as being in a “collecting” phase of the hobby right now. I hope to be able to wind down my rate of purchases in the future, owning most of the miniatures I need for various projects and no longer needing to expend so much time and effort on chasing the damn things(!!). Then I can keep cycling around to “prepared” projects as and when I feel enthused about them again. I know that if I were to become enthusiastic about a brand new project right now, there would be some headaches, angst and aggravation ahead of me before I’ve successfully gotten the preparations in place, at which point I can’t stand the sight of the project.

     

    But its a game innit?

    That’s the thing. A game is supposed to be a source of enjoyment. When attempting to play the game (by way of acquiring miniatures, assembling and painting them, or what-have-you) makes me feel aggravated instead, I start to question the presuppositions that made me think (perhaps in error?) that I was ever going to enjoy the game in the first place.

    I think my causes for “ragequitty” emotions are usually to do with practical obstacles like the aforementioned bad luck I keep having with orders that I make. Another thing that aggravates me a lot is when digging up old miniatures I’ve bought years ago becomes a minor project in itself. I’ve tried organising all my hobby stuff several times, but have always had to stop halfway because of other obligations and pack it back into storage as no less of a mess than it was when I unpacked it – just a differently-configured mess 

    I don’t think other people have ever made me want to ragequit the hobby, or a project within the hobby. I reckon I’m good at not wasting emotions on people who I happen to cross paths with only because they’re travelling in a completely different vector than I am. They can keep doing them, I’ll keep doing me.

    #101931
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    “It doesn’t help when people Vikingsplain at me”

    OK, what does that mean?  I’ve even Googled it but without success.

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #101933
    deephorse
    deephorse
    Participant

    Getting back on topic, I’ve ragequit a wargaming club I belonged to because I could no longer stomach some of the people I was playing with, but I cannot see myself ever quitting wargaming.  I’ve invested too many years of my life, and more money than I care to think about, in enjoying this hobby, and even after 50+ years of doing it I’m still finding new things to interest me.

    Wargamers - successfully driving the fun out of wargaming since 1780

    #101934
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    “It doesn’t help when people Vikingsplain at me” OK, what does that mean? I’ve even Googled it but without success.

    I presume it’s mansplaining but without the gender dimension and relating specifically to expertise on the topic of vikings. When someone automatically assumes the role of “benevolent” teacher and explainer without stopping to think that the listener might already know as much about the topic as they do, or more.

    #101935
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    Sounds like THIS forum is a refuge for people who left the OTHER forum.

    I’d quibble with the word “refuge”. A number of the members of a certain forum could make me somewhat irate & the general running of of the forum was, shall we say, amazing but “refuge” implies we needed safety or shelter. Not so: virtual blowhards don’t have the presence that a real person you might meet at a club game or a show has.

    I would argue that wargames’ forums are not the hobby & if TWW didn’t exist, the hobby would continue for me.

    donald

     

    #101936
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    I’d say ‘not a refuge from anything but a destination in its own right!’

    It’s a positive, hobby enhancing, thoroughly enjoyable, pleasant, sanely moderated place and I’m glad it exists regardless of anywhere else on the net.

    (That’s as much enthusiasm as I can muster on a Friday night without the benefit of alcohol, so I’m off to be grumpy to restore the balance of my humours.)

     

    #101937

    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I wouldn’t define TWW in opposition to any other place.  Here is here and it’s good, so on that point I’d just say “Glad you like it my good friend. Smile.”

    I don’t think (with maybe one exception) that any person has ever risked driving me away from the hobby. I played solitaire for so many years I would just do that again. Perfectly fine for me honestly. It’s more about game types and general tone that surrounds certain games and not others, and this being a big enough hobby I can just not play those kinds of games or with those kinds of gamers.

    #101939
    Ruarigh
    Ruarigh
    Participant

    “It doesn’t help when people Vikingsplain at me” OK, what does that mean? I’ve even Googled it but without success.

    I presume it’s mansplaining but without the gender dimension and relating specifically to expertise on the topic of vikings. When someone automatically assumes the role of “benevolent” teacher and explainer without stopping to think that the listener might already know as much about the topic as they do, or more.

    Yes, that. I’m a cultural historian of the Vikings, so I am particularly prone to being Vikingsplained, especially on certain wargaming forums which shall remain nameless. Fortunately, TWW is more civilised than that, and I really appreciate the camaraderie here. I’m sure we must all have suffered some form of ‘splaining though.

    Never argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    https://emidsvikings.ac.uk/
    #101940
    Ruarigh
    Ruarigh
    Participant

    On the other hand, I have occasionally very nearly quit wargaming due to a deep-seated ennui and a sense of purposelessness when faced with multiple projects and no time to in which to attend to any of them.

    I kind of recognise this feeling, but not exactly as you describe it. I do get that ennui and sense of purposelessness when I look back at my achievements in regard to painting and modelling and am forced to face up to the fact that I’ve progressed at a fraction of the pace I’d been hoping to.

    It’s interesting that you get it when looking back, but I get it when looking forward. Variations on a theme, I guess.

    Never argue with an idiot. They'll only drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    https://emidsvikings.ac.uk/
    #101942
    norm smith
    norm smith
    Participant

    Ragequit …. no way, what else would I do 🙂

    I can’t imagine a time when this hobby would never be central to my interests.

    I don’t care about flitting from project to project, because my wide range of interests has always resulted in that.

    But I do think that actual gaming, whether solo or not, is important and becoming a keyboard warrior interferres with that. But the hobby is a mix at any one time of gamers, collectors, painters and peole just having a rest or a slow down, so just doing what you like at whatever speed you fancy seems a good place to start (or end up!).

    My only Ragequit that I can recall resulted in me leaving a forum and abandoning my blog at the same time. The two issues were linked. That was stupid …. I have since restarted the bog 🙂

    I do like going to a show or seeing those photos on the net, where some older guys have got together and they have some nice looking toys on the table and they look totally chilled out, usually just sitting there relaxed, perhaps they painted one command base last month and have now added it to their table and probably don’t care about the internet or who thinks what! – that just seems a panacea to me and a place where Ragequit could never get a look in. 🙂

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 4 weeks ago by norm smith norm smith.

    http://commanders.simdif.com

    #101944
    Autodidact-O-Saurus
    Autodidact-O-Saurus
    Participant

    While the war gaming hobby does occasionally go dormant for me, I’ve had two occasions when I’ve ‘quit.’ Both were due to being a partner in war gaming shops. The first time it was because the business was moving away from my interests. I just had no interest in gaming or providing customer service for fantasy games, role playing and collectible card games. Granted, I invested little money, but much time and the expected pay-off (comradery with like minded gamers) didn’t justify the time. In the second instance the store was more focused but was geographically too far for me to participate much. After quitting the first store I had no intention of ever returning and it was several years before I regained an interest in the hobby. The second time I was quiescent for a number of months but figured I’d some day return.

    For me, turning ones hobby into a business never worked out well.

    Self taught, persistently behind the times, never up to date. AKA ~ jeff
    More verbosity: http://petiteguerre.blogspot.com/

    #101948
    Ochoin
    Ochoin
    Participant

    I’d say ‘not a refuge from anything but a destination in its own right!’ It’s a positive, hobby enhancing, thoroughly enjoyable, pleasant, sanely moderated place and I’m glad it exists regardless of anywhere else on the net.

    Guy, in his usual eloquent way, has summed things up perfectly.

    No quibbles from me.

     

    donald

    #101949
    grizzlymc
    grizzlymc
    Participant

    The only time I quit the hobby was the period 1981-2015 when I more sat on the fringes than actually quit. That was because with my baggage allowance taken up by clothes, tools and books, anything bigger than Seastrike was difficult to take where I lived. Mind you, I am probably the only person who has ever engaged in modern naval warfare with PNG Highlanders.

    #101959
    MartinR
    MartinR
    Participant

    It’s a hobby and certainly not worth getting in a rage about. I did have a long break from figure gaming in the late 80s and early 90s, but that was more down to a lack of opponents and playing a lot more board and computer games.

    "Mistakes in the initial deployment cannot be rectified" - Helmuth von Moltke

    #101960

    Alan Hamilton
    Participant

    I had to look up “ragequit”.  I have been wargaming for over 55 years and at times my work, family, hobby, social balance altered with all being present but in variable proportions.  I gave up on competitions because they were not fun or socially engaging.  And wargaming for me is a social fun activity.

    One virtually permanent feature from about 1970 is that I have wargamed almost every Monday evening with my long standing opponent and frequently a few others.  Thus wargaming has never gone away.

     

     

    #101961
    Whirlwind
    Whirlwind
    Participant

    I feel exactly the same as Martin.  I have taken a couple of breaks from miniature gaming because it was more fun to play computer and boardgames than overcome the obstacles to playing miniatures games, but that was always with the intention of getting back into it when I did have enough time & space.

    https://hereticalgaming.blogspot.co.uk/

    #101966
    Phil Dutré
    Phil Dutré
    Participant

    Ragequitting? That sounds like something teenagers would do.

    I’m a grown-up man, so I tend not to get upset about what others think or do in the hobby. I might have an opinion about it, but ragequitting? Really?

    That doens’t mean my hobby interests haven’t shifted over the years, and as a result, I have left certain gaming groups, and joined others, whether irl or online. But rage wasn’t really a parameter in the equation.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Phil Dutré Phil Dutré.
    #101971
    irishserb
    irishserb
    Participant

    I’ve thought about this thread for a couple of days, and realized that I haven’t ever really wanted to quit the hobby.  I enjoy the hobby far more than most things that I could do in life for entertainment.  But I have to admit, that I did go through a transition in my gaming “world” several years ago.  I basically walked away from most of the social aspects of the hobby, and became predominantly a solo gamer.

    My first 25 or so years of gaming had focused on gaming frequently with a regular group, attending up to 20 conventions per year, and for several years, being heavily involved with a regional gaming organization.  In time, what I came to realize was that dealing with people in gaming, had largely replaced the participating in and enjoying of the hobby.  This coincided with the general evolution of the hobby, which since the late 1980s has largely been away from the hobby that I originally got involved in.

    The result of my change has been that over the last 15 years, though the demands of life greatly reduced my available gaming time, I have greatly increased my enjoyment in the hobby.  And, as the demands of family and job have begun to recede, this last year has been the most enjoyable in the last 30.

    I do admit though, that I can share some of the same frustrations that Rhoderic expressed in the original post.  Though I’ve actually had pretty good luck over the last year or two, there was a stretch of about three years, where four out of five hobby orders had some significant problem.  Multiple orders at the same time taking 3-4 months to be filled, eventually arriving with wrong items, or items missing, or items miscast to the point that I threw them away.  It can be incredibly frustrating.

    Currently, my biggest issues with the hobby are simply accepting that despite this golden age of gaming, I have to wait two weeks to receive purchases, rather than drive ten minutes to the local shop.  There are actually far more local shops now, than there were back in the 1980s, but the miniatures marketplace has simply changed.  All of the shops now carry the same few canned games; GW, Warlord, FoW, clicky and collectible.  The same games and miniatures at every shop.  For me, the wrong rules, scale, materials(not a fan of plastics), and/or styles of games.  What can’t I get?  Micro-armor, Star Trek, 15mm modern or WWII, ancients, ACW, 20mm moderns, 15/25/28mm colonials, 1/2400 naval.  Basically anything that makes up the things that I gamed or still game.

    I really, really miss being able to buy a fig and paint it the same day, or same week even.  It doesn’t make me want to quit the hobby; build a time machine maybe, but not quit the hobby.

    #101972
    Thaddeus Blanchette
    Thaddeus Blanchette
    Participant

    People saying “300+ dollars for the new Adeptus Titanicus is actually really quite reasonable when you compare it to other things GW sell”.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    #101974
    Guy Farrish
    Guy Farrish
    Participant

    I’d say ‘not a refuge from anything but a destination in its own right!’ It’s a positive, hobby enhancing, thoroughly enjoyable, pleasant, sanely moderated place and I’m glad it exists regardless of anywhere else on the net.

    Guy, in his usual eloquent way, has summed things up perfectly. No quibbles from me. donald

    Money’s in the post .

    #101977

    warwell
    Participant

    I never totally quit the hobby, or even wanted to. However, most of my gaming these days is solo so I don’t really have any irritants. Some people on forums can annoy me, but I just ignore them.

    About 20 years ago I used to run email Diplomacy games, but I quit that because to many people got too enraged about stuff that happened in the games.

    #101978
    Rhoderic
    Rhoderic
    Participant

    It’s a hobby and certainly not worth getting in a rage about.

    Hence ragequitting. Beats rage-continuing 

     

    Ragequitting? That sounds like something teenagers would do. I’m a grown-up man, so I tend not to get upset about what others think or do in the hobby. I might have an opinion about it, but ragequitting? Really?

    Well, since you make me have to defend what I’ve said, then yes, really.

    While I fully expect there is in part a generational divide in attitudes to ragequitting, and even more so to the use of that word (which I admit is a bit of a neologism, though it’s hardly brand-new), it’s a bit disparaging to say that no one older than a teenager would do it. Part of my inspiration for asking the question is that, by chance, I’ve recently come across several honest discussions on the topic of ragequitting – by that word – in different Youtube/Twitch channels and podcasts (none of which were directly related to this hobby, if that matters). They were all hosted by thirty-somethings. Calm, reasonable, likeable thirty-somethings behaving in a perfectly adult manner, having stimulating discussions on the topic. Not teenagers bashing keyboards against computer screens because they keep losing in Fortnite.

    I suppose there’s a risk that people may read too much into the word itself. There tends to be a slight humorous, deliberately-exaggerative irony to the word, and I’m using it as such. It’s not like I’m talking about smashing miniatures against the table or ripping up rulebooks (though I’ve heard some funny anecdotes about that kind of behaviour from competitive wargamers ).

     

    I do admit though, that I can share some of the same frustrations that Rhoderic expressed in the original post. Though I’ve actually had pretty good luck over the last year or two, there was a stretch of about three years, where four out of five hobby orders had some significant problem. Multiple orders at the same time taking 3-4 months to be filled, eventually arriving with wrong items, or items missing, or items miscast to the point that I threw them away. It can be incredibly frustrating.

    You have no idea how comforting it is to hear I’m not the only person in the world to have, or have had, “the curse”. I’d say it happens to me with approximately 50% of the orders I make (scattered across many vendors, so that no one vendor stands out as particularly unreliable). That’s not counting miscasts, which I don’t have the energy to quibble over with manufacturers who have evidently deemed the offending items good enough to sell. Also not counting broken pieces, for which I don’t hold the vendors at fault (I presume the pieces broke in the post, and that’s the nature of the beast when one chooses to engage in a hobby revolving around fine-cast miniatures), but which can still be quite dejecting at times.

    (For that matter, in case anyone is reading me wrong, there’s a limit to how much I hold vendors “at fault” for making mistakes processing my orders. I understand that they’re small businesses, that mistakes happen, and that if I ever start up my own vanity business as part of this hobby I’ll be in the same position. I’m not ranting about vendors in this thread, I’m talking about how frustrating it can feel when the reality of the hobby doesn’t live up to the fantasy.)

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Rhoderic Rhoderic.
    #101982

    Gone Fishing
    Participant

    Rhoderic, I’m a great admirer of your posts generally: you are a gifted writer, full of any number perceptive comments on many different subjects. I also rather like your icon.

    With that said, this discussion (whether raised in partial jest or not) has taken me somewhat aback. The word “ragequitting” is unpleasant; the behavior it describes far more so. I’m not sure one should “ragequit” anything, even regarding far more serious matters, much less over something as intrinsically silly as fiddling about with toy soldiers. It is infantile in the extreme. What would our grandfathers have said about such behavior? There are times to be frustrated, of course; there are times when interest flags; there are times when a new group of hobbyists might be a better fit; and yes, there are times to be angry – but to “ragequit”? Never.

    There, I’ve said my piece. You disagree (articulately I’m sure). This doesn’t keep me from genuinely looking forward to seeing your future posts on other topics. They are just great. So keep up the good work!

    Kind regards,

    Daryl

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