Home Forums Horse and Musket 18th Century Which bit of the 18th century attracts you most, and why?

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  • #5594
    willzwillz
    Participant

    Adam those cavalry are very nicely done.

    #5604
    Graham Cummings
    Participant

    As you will guess being the owner of Crann Tara Miniatures – first and foremost its the ’45 Rebellion. It is so full of what if’s and if you really look at the potential troops involved – Dutch, Hessians, Marines, French, loads of Militia types – Georgia scouts etc. etc. and that is what I wanted for myself and hence the range.

    In the wider sense the 1740’s – its the start of transition for the French army, but Fontenoy is the climatic battle, Marshall Saxe etc. and if you wish to go off the wall, which I hope to – ‘The War of Jenkins Ear’, Britain against the Spanish in America, again full of lovely looking troops and full of what ifs.

    Graham

    #6988
    Brendan Morrissey
    Participant

    My introduction to wargames literature was at the age of around 11/12,  flicking through a copy of “Charge!” in Hamleys one Christmas, followed soon after by coming across “The Wargame” in the library* of my dad’s old school. when he was visiting the headmaster.  So I suppose an interest in 18th Century should have been a foregone conclusion, but for some strange reason – possibly the Charles Grant snr Napoleonic Wargaming series in the first volume of Military Modelling – most of my Airfix figures, and then my early metals (Hinchliffe, then Minifigs 25mm) were French and British Napoleonics.  Then came 1975, and a trip to the British Library to see an exhibition of maps and contemporary illustrations for the Bicentennial of the start of the AWI; the following summer, a similar exhibition of art and artefacts celebrating the Bicentennial of the Declaration of Independence, took place at the National Maritime Museum.  I was hooked (and still have the catalogues for both).  Around the same time, Airfix brought out their “British Grenadiers” and “Washington’s Army” sets; these were followed – in my perspective – by a series of excellent modelling/conversion articles in the (sadly) short-lived modelling magazine published by Almark – just a stone’s throw from my parents’ home (and no, it wasn’t me who threw those stones, mister, it was those big boys).  Yet despite all this, the clincher (in terms of 18th Century) was the two Garrison SYW booklets (recently re-published, I believe) which got me buying some of their simple (by today’s standards), but very likeable range of figures.  These were the first complete (metal) units I ever painted, and I still have them.

    My premier 18th Century period is now AWI.  I like it because it is a fascinating period of history/episode in the evolution of warfare, which appeals to my historical side.  In gaming terms, it involves small armies fighting small battles.  I’ve always been intrigued by the “petite guerre”/”kleine krieg” side of H&M warfare, and the AWI was, in essence, pure “little war” from start to finish.  Despite this, it is also a predominantly infantry war, and as such is perfect for studying and demonstrating linear tactics, which in turn gives the gamer an idea of the temporal and spatial problems of manoeuvering groups of men on the battlefield.  Plus, nice uniforms, artillery not over-dominant, and just enough cavalry to make things interesting.  My WSS stuff is mostly based around the orbats in the Charles Grant jnr book of 52 scenarios; I decided I didn’t want to have to paint all the over-elaborate uniforms of the SYW, and the simpler WSS uniforms and limited number of common troop types (hussars were new and novel) seemed the answer.

    [ * As an aside, the same library also had a little hardback Airfix book with photos of converted figures – I can recall Confederate infantry repainted as Royal Navy landing party, and a massive square of British infantry in 1890s Home Service dress made up of the standing/kneeling/lying firing figures from the German WW1 infantry set.  ]

    Birch bark canoes slipping through snowy forests…..

    I know what you meant, but I love the initial mental image.

    #7022
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Does Spanish North America from about 1680 – 1820 count since it includes the 18th Century?

    Soldados, Presidials, Zorro (well it can be historical,) Indios moving from small bands of foot in California to the “horsing” of the Southwest Indians that resulted in Comanches, the Apaches being pushed into the mountains and then making Comanche and Spanish pay a price in turn, the Pueblo peoples, the Zuni, the Navaho, and the terrain being a factor that all sides had to fight or adapt to.

    Nothing is so neat as Comanche and Spanish Lancers clashing.

    #7058
    armchairgeneralarmchairgeneral
    Participant

    Most of it really. I currently game AWI and I am now starting WSS so those are the “book ends” of the 18<sup>th</sup> Century period.

     

    For AWI I am particularly drawn to the Southern theatre from when Green takes command. Quite a contract between US and British armies and the tactics required. I really enjoy gaming with the American army.

     

    I can’t say I know that much about WSS yet. Still reading around it. I was very keen on doing a SYW Prussian army for a while and may still do this period at some point.

    #7071
    Meic KellyMeic Kelly
    Participant

    Hi,

    New to the forum, and my first post.

    I’ve had a long standing fascination with the Jacobite Rebellions, and the ’45 in particular from childhood.

    In fact I find most rebellions interesting and am quite often drawn to the ‘loosing’ side. From a gaming perspective it’s currently AWI, starting to paint a WSS French army, and slowly working away on some Jacobites for the ’45. I’m also drawn to the FIW, and have nearly finished two sets for Muskets and Tomahawks. 7YW is also on the agenda, though I keep changing my mind about figure scale.

    After gaming many periods and following a period of rationalisation, I’ve come to realise that the 18th century is my spiritual wargames home. I like visually appealing tables, and love the look of neat linear formations. It’s also an age for gentlemen. Recently picked up some Charles Grant books, and am very pleased to add them to my collection. Also I was fortunate enough to acquire a copy of A Military Gentleman by John Ray which is a treasured possession.

    So I think pretty much all of it attracts me, the period abounds with great adventure, fascinating characters, battles large and small, and rebellions!

    Cheers

    Meic

     

     

    Command Base http://meicwargames.blogspot.co.uk/

    #7072
    Henry Hyde
    Participant

    I’ve come to realise that the 18th century is my spiritual wargames home. I like visually appealing tables, and love the look of neat linear formations. It’s also an age for gentlemen.

    Amen to that. Welcome, Melc, I’m sure we’ll have plenty to chat about!

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    #7080
    Meic KellyMeic Kelly
    Participant

    Thanks Henry, look forward to contributing where I can and learning from the wealth of experience and knowledge that the forum will attract. It’s taken me a while to settle down in a wargaming sense, after all one man cannot do it all (even though I might still try!). Still indulge in other periods though, like most others, but at least I’ve identified what will be my major focus.

    Cheers

    Meic

     

     

    Command Base http://meicwargames.blogspot.co.uk/

    #8691
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Somebody stop me! I saw the Khurasan 15 mm Spanish troops for the WSS and I can forsee addiction issues…

    I am slowly thinking of returning to linear warfare of the WSS/AWI/F&I (Muskets and Mohawks rules for battles and Long Rifle for more skirmish oriented action) type combat. These figures aren’t helping my resistance…

    I have a local war gamer who runs games in the 7YW era using Koenig Krieg (spelling?) rules and pretty much one scenario (Minden?) with a single focus terrain item, a city/town, in the middle of the field. Apparently others have Prussian and Russian armies but I have never seen them on the table in over 20 years gaming here. I do know they take them to South Bend, Indiana, of all places, (My wife grew up there,) for some super 7YW convention annually.

    #8721
    Rudy Nelson
    Participant

    The American Revolution has a lot of interest for me. best I can tell, my ancestors were Loyalist Scots who were forced west in Alabama from GA and FLA.  The largest section in our county phone book was the Mac/ Mc section. LOL.

    The amount of color diversity in uniforms is great. (Red, green, white, mid-blue, dark Blue, browns, tans and a myriad of frontier and militia dress colors)  You can field forces for battle of both small and medium and still have a lot of fun and variety.

    #8786
    Brendan Morrissey
    Participant

    The amount of color diversity in uniforms is great. (Red, green, white, mid-blue, dark Blue, browns, tans and a myriad of frontier and militia dress colors) You can field forces for battle of both small and medium and still have a lot of fun and variety.

    I would add two more attractions to that:-

    1) It’s a small, small, small, small world: small armies, small units, small battlefields, small amount of time needed to play out an enjoyable game. No massed cavalry or large-calibre artillery to dominate the game, making tactical appreciation and innovation most important.

    2) With low figure:man ratios you can have larger units than normal, and begin to get an idea of the temporal and spatial problems of manoeuvering troops in linear formations

    #8807
    Henry Hyde
    Participant

    No massed cavalry

    …which is why I can’t love the AWI. Very lovely, as you say, in so many respects, but I fell in love with Charles Grant’s charging dragoon figures in The War Game in 1971 and have never looked back!

    I think it’s fair to say that a number of excellent books and figure ranges for the AWI have appeared in the last 5-10 years that have, however, made many gamers give the AWI a second look. For me, Mark Urban’s Fusiliers was very thought provoking and of course the Perry plastics have made a real impact. I’ve also been very taken with the Fife & Drum stuff, exquisite sculpts.

    Editor, Battlegames
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    #12827
    Caesar Anderson
    Participant

    I like simple troop types and game mechanics, so you can put on big battles and concentrate on grand tactics without getting caught up in troop specifics. Too often in wargames the peripheral issues (such as skirmishing or gun calibre) absorb an inordinate effort of rules management, that generals would never have been overly concerned about, complicating and slowing the game down in a way that would never have been the focus of a real battle.

    The beginning of the century is my favourite, defined by the rationalisation of infantry formations through the socket bayonet, along with the flavour of medieval nuances, such as heavily armoured cuirassiers. The uniforms are easy to paint, yet colourful enough. There are no shortage of great battles and inspiring leaders from Marlborough to Peter the Great.

    #13452
    paintpigpaintpig
    Participant

    War of the Spanish Succession… why? Obvious, features the greatest captain of the 18th century, arguably of the horse and musket era. John Churchill.

    And just to make sure it stays my favourite I refuse to game it…

    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel
    Slowly Over A Low Flame

    #13471
    Mr. Average
    Participant

    I’d have to say the American Revolution would be my personal interest in the period, and not just because it was the event that created my country (though that’s a big part of it).  It’s the touchstone of so much history that came after it, in that it didn’t so much result in territory changing hands as so many European wars did, it resulted in the creation of an entirely new country altogether, which I find very interesting to consider in parallel with the dynastic politics of the XVIII Century.

    It’s also fun to play out on the tabletop, as others have said, since you can play battles of many varying sizes with lots of the goodies of the period – colorful uniforms, livery, etc.

    #13509
    Edward Sturges
    Participant

    Greetings

    For me it is the SYW in Europe, mainly in Western Germany but also some of the Austro-Prussian operations.  Basically it has got almost everything – skirmishing, sieges, open battles, great and poor commanders, colourful uniforms, emergent tactical doctrines.

    Regards

    Edward

    #14067
    Henry Hyde
    Participant

    Those of you interested in the AWI may be interested to know that John Curry of the History of Wargaming Project http://wargaming.co is about to publish a brand new book by Charlie Wesencraft (yes, THE C. F. Wesencraft) called Seven Steps to Freedom, which includes a set of AWI rules in the inimitable Wesencraft style. It’s a lovely book – and I wrote the foreword!   The book is packed with scenarios, as he presents many of the prominent battles of the SYW in America and the AWI. Should be out in the next few weeks.

    Editor, Battlegames
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    #14082
    CameronianCameronian
    Participant

    I’m getting pulled toward the British army of the George II period with Dettingen and Fontenoy and the like. Smart uniforms and a small range of unit types.

    I’ve already got forces for both sides in the AWI (28mm), Prussians for SYW with Saxons/French planned (15mm), British WSS with French WSS in progress (28mm) and Government and Jacobite forces for the ’15 (28mm). So A George II force in 28mm would fit nicely.

    'The time has come" The walrus said. "To talk of many things: Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--Of cabbages--and kings--And why the sea is boiling hot--And whether pigs have wings."

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