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  • in reply to: HMS Captain 1/700 #156518
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Vol,

    That’s very nice!  Forgive the late comment, but real life has kept me from the internet for a while.  Where did you have the hull printed?

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Three new ships on my blog #155862
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thanks, gentlemen.

    KB:  Yeah, I know.  We’ve had this one for 16 years now.  As I told someone else, if she disappeared I would be the prime suspect!

    Patrice:  You’re probably right. 😁  I’d be OK if she attacked my computer mouse.  I don’t want her looking for rats up there!  I am proud of my ships, and put the most effort into them of all my minis.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: New blog post after some time off #151640
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    The quickest answer to your question is that the RN is not able to use much of their power.  There is no actual shooting at each other.

    Longer answer:

    A one-off game lasts 20 turns, and will have a mixture of ships on the board.  Usually, it is several trawlers, being protected by RN ships or (more often) auxiliaries such as tugboats or workboats.  The trawlers are gaining victory points by fishing.  When the Icelandic Coast Guard (ICG) arrives, the British player has to decide if he wants to continue fishing, or start pulling in his nets, which takes several turns.  The ICG attempts to cut the trawl lines and if successful, the British player loses all VP from that trawler.    The RN/auxiliary ships try to protect the trawlers by keeping the ICG away, which can range from simply herding them, or even ramming them to try and keep them away.  You can also use trawlers to try and ram if they lose their nets.  However, if you damage an opponent’s ship so severely that it sinks, then you lose.  As the British player, you must gain at least 20 VP to win in a one-off game.  There’s also a campaign where you have a limited number of ships as either the RN/ICG, so you have to pick your battles wisely.

    Sometimes, you get lucky in a campaign as the ICG and find trawlers with no escort.  Alternately, you as the British might assign trawlers to a fishing area where there are no ICG.  In either of those cases, you automatically earn VP (in this case, Campaign Points or CP but same idea) so there’s no need for a bunch of useless scenarios.  There are even rules for using aircraft.  If you have a scenario during the campaign in an area where you have an aircraft, then your VP are doubled, due to publicity.  Alternately, you could use the aircraft for reconnaissance instead, and have an advantage in setting up your forces for a campaign scenario.  After 20 campaign turns, it’s over and the player with the highest number of CP wins the campaign.

    I don’t think that either of those answers really gives you the full game experience, but now you at least have an idea.  Right now the rules are going for $13.91 US on Wargame Vault, or 10 Pounds.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Anatomy of a Painting Desk #141649
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    I was thinking almost the very same thing! 😂  When I saw the picture, my first thought was, “Huh, can’t be real.  MUCH too tidy and organized.”

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: First Falklands post #141568
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    OK, you’re clearly going to make me admit this embarrassing part of my life.  This one time, at band camp. . .(no, wait.  Wrong embarrassing part).

    THIS is the embarrassing part I meant:  I’ve never been good with washes.  They either come out too light, or WAY too heavy.  I realize that it’s almost impossible to make a carrier flight deck look too dirty.  At the same time though, I’m afraid of going the way too heavy route and having to redo the whole thing yet again.  To be honest,  I’m not sure that redoing the deck would happen if I screwed it up again.

    BWW

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: First Falklands post #141462
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Mike,

    Thank you for catching that.  I’ve edited the original post so that the address is now correct.  I guess that’s what happens when you don’t post anything to Ye Olde Blogge for a couple of months! 🙄🤬

    Darby,

    I have some of that type of masking tape, but after screwing it up the first time, I wasn’t even about to try using it.  I do like the way the decals turned out, but I will agree with you about the flight deck being too clean!  That’s why I want to eventually put some deck gear and aircraft/helicopters on it to try and hide that a bit.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thanks.  Once upon a time, I could have painted all those stripes by hand and they would have been straight.  Not so much anymore, I have discovered.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: A different type of post on the blog #135044
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Tony,

    Sorry for the late reply.  I don’t normally put posts in this area of the site, and quite honestly, forgot to come back and check for a couple of days!  If you’re essential personnel, then please, PLEASE make sure you’re taking all the proper precautions for yourself and your family.

    It sounds selfish, but I’m glad to hear that other people are having problems keeping new projects from popping up.  It’s good to know that it’s not just me! 😂   The itch for new projects could well be a reaction to the quarantine and restrictions.  I hadn’t thought about it that way; instead, I just put it down to the usual “Ooh, shiny!” tendency that all gamers seem to have.

    I think you’re right about the cars, in that they would work really with Mad Max 1934.  They are, after all, completely period correct.  I also looked at those rules, but backed away from them.  I know that they are aimed more towards 28mm, but I’m guessing you can run it using whatever models you want.

    It was always my plan to try and make the blog post titles music related.  In the rush of getting the blog stated, I sort of went away from that and used plain old descriptive titles.  Now that I’ve been in operation for a while, it was time to get back to my original intent.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: A different type of post on the blog #134903
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Yes, between 2.5 and 3 inches.  They also offer them in 1/100 scale, but I thought those would be too small.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Broadside and Ram Club Games #131603
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    That’s a pretty game!

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Last blog post of the year #128608
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Norm,

    Thank you.  The flip side of that is, I wish I could paint 28mm figures as nice as your Harold Steptoesson.  As for the ships, like anything else it just takes practice.  Given the skill level you showed on Harold, I think you’ll be just fine.

    As an aside, that series was translated into the US as “Sandford and Son.”

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Spanish ship "Rayo" up on the blog. #127726
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Vol.,

    Something I saw in the model doesn’t seem to come through in the photos.  In the white, parts of the bulwarks looked a bit, um, “blotty” for want of a better word.  You could see areas where it looked like there were differing pieces of resin in the ship itself.  I don’t really know how to explain it in a way that makes sense.

    One thing I found especially interesting is that, in the pictures of the broken bulwark, the resin is clearly gray.  It was white when I painted it.  I didn’t know resin was so porous as to absorb colors like that.  I’m assuming that the black paint soaked into the resin, turning it gray, as it seems to be the only thing that would explain that.

    BWW

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Spanish ship "Rayo" up on the blog. #127558
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thanks guys.  I readily admit that my ships are something about which I’m rather vain.

    Thomaston:  Threading the lines like I do does make the rigging a little more complicated.  It’s not an original idea; I actually got it from the Langton’s book on painting and rigging their models.  Interlocking the rigging like that does provide one MASSIVE advantage to the models.  That advantage is: If the model is dropped or the masts are bent out of shape, doing the standing rigging in this fashion actually permits it to work as advertised.  That is, moving one of the bent masts will move the others back into rough alignment as well.  There’s no need to ask how I know this. . . . 🙄😭

    EDIT:  The edges of the gunports are red, which means the interior portion of the port is red.  The exterior portion of the port lid would be yellow, just like the sides of the ship.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Brian Weathersby. Reason: Additional info

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Convention report part II on the blog #125095
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    It was fun, and we had a pretty good turnout all things considered.  We had to find this site on the fly after the Battleship Texas Foundation shut the ship down for the foreseeable future.  Next time, I will try and get some more pictures of games I didn’t play in.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Contention report part I on the blog #124859
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Jeff,

    Thanks.  I do get tired up convention games that are just “line ’em up and shoot,” so I try to come up with different ideas.  I was afraid that there wouldn’t be enough action for the players, but got lucky and had a couple who also enjoyed off-the-wall scenarios.

    I haven’t read any of the Alexander Clay books.  My favorites are Forester and O’Brian, although not necessarily in that order.  In high school/college I read the Richard Bolitho books by Douglas Reeman (aka Alexander Kent), but not all of them.

    The convoy scenario works great for foggy weather.  You just put a grid on your mapboard and put a marker in each box.  Only the gamemaster needs to know what’s what.  I’m still not too sure about how to do a battle, with people popping in and out of visibility, like Calder’s Action.  Dummy movement markers when out of range, perhaps?  That could very complicated very quick.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Another New 74 Up On The Blog #123079
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thanks, Vol.  I’m glad to see you’re doing OK, as your blog has been quiet here lately.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Another New 74 Up On The Blog #122380
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thank you Norm.  Langton models do have a lot of atmosphere.  My collection is overwhelmingly Langton, although I do have some Skytrex/Red Eagle hulls with Langton masts/sails.  I’m of the opinion that since we spend 90% of our time painting and 10% playing, you may as well get the best you can afford to buy.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Another New 74 Up On The Blog #122278
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Jeff,

    It looks intimidating, but it’s really not.  I would even go so far as to say that you don’t have to do ALL the rigging your first time out.  The standing rigging is useful; many times I’ve straightened all the bent masts by pulling on one and having the standing rigging pull everything else back into line.  Just do what you’re comfortable with, and add more as you go.

    As for the waist ports on the ship, they are actually painted dark gray, not black.  These ports could be boarded up in heavy weather, but they did not normally have gunport lids.  The idea is that the dark gray will (sort of) simulate  a view into the waist through those ports, since there wouldn’t be a lot of direct sunlight.  On my open, upper deck gunports I paint those a very light gray, to kind of simulate sunlight pouring through them.  I also think it helps break up the monotony of black.  Below is a picture of a 1760 model of a 74 gunner, and you can see in the photo that there are no gunport lids on the waist.

    I will say though, that if I received a miniature that had gunports molded into place there, I would paint them.  The Langton hulls have depressions there instead of raised ports, albeit possibly not on all their models.

     

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Another New 74 Up On The Blog #122162
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Every now and then, I do wish I hadn’t gone full out on my original models, to be sure! However, I have enough of them now that I’m obliged to keep doing it, as they would look silly otherwise.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Book reviews on the blog #121207
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Oops, sorry.  Too late at night to be doing PR work, I guess.

    https://mymodelsailingships.blogspot.com/p/books.html

     

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Whaling ships on the blog #120461
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Darby,

    An honest question deserves an honest answer.  Putting the white stripe midway down the hull would interfere with the graffiti I’ve made for protesters to put on the factory ship.

    One of the ways for protest players to gain points is to take a Zodiac boat next to the factory ship and spray paint anti-whaling slogans on the hull.  I’ve made up a few, and will show them along with some other makers in the next post.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Whaling ships on the blog #120460
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thomaston,

    Yeah, the factory ship is kind of boring looking where the paint job is concerned.    The harpoon boats are definitely more colorful.  As for the whale, the photo somehow gives him more personality than it has in real life.  I have some unpainted ones, and was considering doing one as a killer whale who would of course be named, “Willy.”

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Greenpeace ships on the blog #117923
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    I was quite surprised myself at how much of a difference the decals made.

    To be sure, this is definitely a bit of an outgrowth from the Cod Wars.  It’s a small, pretty much self-contained project that doesn’t require a lot of ships and was a great deal of fun when I played a few years ago.  They’ve been fun to paint, and the number is so small that it doesn’t really bite into any other projects, time-wise.  Combine that with the fact that I am a bit of a fanboy for David Manley rules, and the choice was really pretty easy!

    As for being “almost tempted,” well c’mon man, you know you want to. 😈  I have come to call Shapeways “The Great Enabler,” and if DM ever puts his bespoke models up for sale will gladly buy some (although I would prefer that they be 1/1200 or 1/1250).

    http://dtbsam.blogspot.com/2019/05/save-whales.html

    EDIT:  Don’t know why the devil emoji turned out blueish/purple.  Maybe he’s in the lowest circle of Hell, where it’s icy.

     

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: New ACW ships on the blog #109460
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    donald,

    Yes, calling them temperamental is putting it mildly!  I was doing some looking around online due to this conversation, and found an interesting statistic.  Between 1816 and 1852, there were 7,000 deaths on steamboats in the US.  About 1/2 of those were due to boiler explosions. So, 3,500 deaths in about 36 years, roughly 1 every three days or thereabouts.  Apparently the steamboat industry was the first one that Congress passed safety regulations on.

    Steve,

    Thanks, and I will have to take a look at that.  I don’t normally like gridded games, but it never hurts to look, right?

    Vol,

    Apparently the secret to making them look good is to make them look rusty, dirty and crappy!  Hopefully I’ll be using them sometime soon.  So many projects, so few gaming opportunities….

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: New ACW ships on the blog #109370
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Steve,

    Gridded naval wargames book?  Interesting, go on. . . .

    Donald,

    In no way would I take it as an insult; indeed, I know exactly what you mean.  I’m always amazed at the engineers who went, “Ya know, if we take a riverboat, and bolt this to it, and then some of this (oh, and more of that first thing), and add some guns, I think we can make a warship out of all these bits and pieces.”  I called them “grubby little boats” in an early blog post, but that’s just my sailing ship bias slipping though.

    Jeff,

    Oh, heavens yes!  In some ways, I think the Internet has made this hobby a bit harder than in the past.  There is now so much information out there that, if you’re not careful, you can wind up with ‘analysis paralysis.’  If I just look a little more, I can find that ONE SOURCE online that will confirm <fill in the blank> once and for all.  Back in the day, you finally just picked a source and went with it.  The Eads boats are a perfect example; the only thing everyone seems to agree on are the colors of those stack bands.  For the rest, I’ve got 3 or 4 different sources that all differ about what colors  the ships themselves were painted.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: New ACW ships on the blog #109219
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thanks Donald.  I must admit that I had to look up “Heath Robinson,” only to discover that he was the equivalent of our Rube Goldberg here in the US.  Consequently, I can’t take credit for their appearances; must credit the original designers instead!

    There’s a good set of Mississippi River campaign rules called Anaconda on Wargame Vault.  The author has written other campaign rules as well, covering the eastern coast and Red River campaigns.  I think there are land rules, but if so they are very basic.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: 1/1200 scale Leander frigates? #108552
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    I sent an email to both, and Dave Willcocks responded.  As I told him, after so many fruitless internet searches he was an embarrassment of riches!  He has several, and right now we’re figuring out which ones I need to get.  In theory weapons loadout  shouldn’t matter because they are just for your Cod Wars rules.  However, I’m already thinking about other things to use them for (typical gamer ADD, I guess).  I’m thinking a Falklands scenario/campaign might be interesting.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: 1/1200 scale Leander frigates? #108520
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    I did see that over there, and thank you.  I need to contact both of them and get on the “wish list” for a Leander.  I had the December catalog from both sites, and they did not mention any.  I found a model of the Almirante Condell (the Chilean variant of the Leander class) on Shapeways, but it is too different from the RN version to be useful.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    That first cover is DEFINITELY the one I had!  I specifically remember the rules being in dot-matrix printer text and the cover was a blue-gray color.  I don’t remember where I got them now.  Maybe the old Modeler’s Mart in Safety Harbor, FL?  Either way, definitely via mail order.   I wish I knew what ever happened to them.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: British frigates on the blog #108297
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    MattH:

    Thanks.  I told the person who was the inspiration for the whole Cod Wars kick on Wednesday.  He sounded very excited about it as well.  After all, when you ram something with a sailing ship, it’s almost as bad for you as it is for them.

    Jeff:

    Yeah, I kinda thought that myself; that’s why I called that post “The Descendants.”  I will admit though, that the OP on this thread might be considered a bit of clickbait, given my record.   As for the activity of others it is, in this case, correct.  After reading their two blogs I realized that I needed to get off my lazy butt and do something.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    I may have had these about a million years ago.  Do you have any pictures of the original cover?

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: A couple of painted trawlers #105219
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Normally I just use any rattlecan primer, usually in black.  What happened here is that I picked up a can of satin black by mistake.  It left the model very slick, and my normal paints just wouldn’t grip the model.  So, I decided to spray the ship with a clear flat to give my paints something to hold onto.  What happened instead was the the black paint crackled like an old piece of furniture.  I was afraid of trying to clean off the paint with something like acetone because I didn’t know what it would do to the model.

    As to why I primed, well the recommendation on the Shapeways forums is that you do so.  An interesting point came from the designer of the minis; he told me on my blog that there is something in the clear plastic material that stops enamel paints from drying unless the model is “extremely clean.”  I did clean them with Simple Green and Dawn detergent as recommended,  but maybe I didn’t get it clean enough for the enamel spray paint to dry?  I don’t know enough about chemistry to say why a “primer” is better than regular paint, but it does appear to be the case on these.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: A couple of painted trawlers #105165
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Thanks.  I took a terracotta color and an earth brown, mixed them together and then thinned it way down.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: A new mini-project #104378
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Ochoin,

    Lucky for you, I like bad puns.  And I must say, that was a bit of a masterclass.  Of course, the only answer to “Cod be with you” is “And also with you.”

     

    cmnash,

    Simple Green is an all-purpose cleaner sold here in the States that is non-toxic and biodegradable.  It doesn’t have bleach, ammonia or alcohol in it. It also says, “Do not use on suede, leather, unfinished wood, opals or pearls.”  Other than that, I’m not sure what’s in it as the ingredient list is rather vague.  According to the company website, it’s sold in the UK, but looks like it may only be available in bulk.

    http://www.simplegreen.co.uk/

     

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Naval Wargames Weekend 2019 #104031
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    I don’t think my wife will let me fly to the UK for a naval games day.  So, colo(u)r me jealous, but still badly wanting to go.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Battle of Lake Erie Blog Post #103732
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    That’s a simple solution also.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Pre Dreadnoughts in the Adriatic #103723
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Those are some really nice looking ships.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Battle of Lake Erie Blog Post #103722
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    Oh, I missed Chippewa.  Would you be willing to give her a 1/2 factor?  Otherwise, one could assume that either they find another 12 pounder to put on board, or use the alternative 18 pounder, which would get you most of the way to 1 point.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Three Naval Games in One Day! #103704
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    It was fun.  Much like the days when we were younger, and would get together for a whole day of gaming.  I’m hoping we can do it again in the near future.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

    in reply to: Battle of Lake Erie Blog Post #103703
    Brian Weathersby
    Participant

    This does look interesting!  1812 on the Lakes is an area I’ve been interested in, but never ventured into.  Even in 1/1200 scale some of those ships are tiny;  in 1/2400 they must be minuscule!

    May I suggest going with the 25 factor as the basis for your guns?  At least there, nobody winds up with a 0 rating.  Going down to the 10 factor might make the larger ships very overpowering.

    I'm lucky to be here
    With someone I like
    Who maketh my spirit to shine
    --Warren Zevon

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