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  • in reply to: International Naval Wargames Day #141854
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Cheers Jim, much appreciated.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New Spanish Builds, Part Five #141591
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi,

    Yes I will be doing the Monarca along with the Argonauta and San Justo when I complete the Third Rates of Renown box set from Warlord in the next series of posts.

    The Monarca is generally referred to as a third rate 74-gun ship of the line. The number of guns refers solely to the long guns carried and is nothing to do with calibre or weight of shot fired which could be quite different from one 74-gun ship to another.

    The number of guns is often a bone of contention as sources can vary, with different gun arrangements over time, as can the weight of the ball fired by those long guns, with the different navies having heavier or lighter pounds. On top of that, once the British designed the light weight gun called the carronade that fired a very heavy ball at a relatively short range, designed to smash the enemy ships side in with ball shot and grape, the actual pounds of shot delivered in a broadside multiplied massively in some cases. However carronades were generally not included in the gun rating of a ship.  As you will see Neptuno was reportedly fitted out for Trafalgar with 72 long guns and 18 obussiers, effectively 90 guns if you include her short range carronades

    I think the best way of comparing one ship to another is by looking at the broadside weight of shot delivered by its long guns and add in the carronade/obussier (French & Spanish) poundage to compare one with another.

    The War by Sail rules I started playing with before the lockdown really captures these differences in gun load out quite nicely and allows the gamer to set up their ship according to these different gunnery arrangements.

    https://jjwargames.blogspot.com/search/label/War%20by%20Sail

    Hope that helps

    JJ

     

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – British 20-gun Sloop #141511
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks for your comments chaps, much appreciated.

    The plastic kits are very amenable to modification with a bit of pre-planning and thought towards the likely challenges that arise when converting, but plasticard, plastirod, liquid cement and the odd bit of modelling filler can cover off most of the likely ones, and I should say I am a jobbing wargamer and I’m not trying to produce a museum showcase model, but something that will appeal to the eye when out on a wargames table.

    The other thing I would recommend with this kind of project is to start building a spares box with these models, as you will end up with plenty of spare components from doing the standard models and I hang on to all my left over boats, decks, stern galleries and figureheads with these kind of conversion jobs very much in mind.

    I am always happy to reply to enquiries on the blog, especially if you want to get started in this scale and there are tutorial resources together with modelling tips In the previous ‘All at Sea’ posts there.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – British 20-gun Sloop #141357
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    Thank you. No lengthening, I decided to keep things simple, using liquid cement to get a close and discreet weld. The mainmast was adapted from the mizzen with some lengthening required with a little bit of plastic rod and then the hull fittings added as you mentioned. I adapted frigate ratlines for the mainmast and added a davit boat – job done.

    The brig is a nice model, but the numbers supplied in the various boxes mean you end up with more than any collector could need so a ready modification was top of my list to try.

    Next up will be a 64-gun SOL when I get a minute.

    JJ

     

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Patriot Pirates noted – thanks chaps.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    I’ve found the more of these I do, the quicker and easier it gets, which is why I will probably postpone some other work I had planned to break the back of this.

    Hope it works for you

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – Rigging Tutorial Video, Part One #137697
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    Thanks for the comment, British Running Rigging now up.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: AWI Commands and Sabot Bases #136215
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Chaps,

    Thanks for your comments. Hopefully with a few additions and life returning to normal I might be able to get these figures out on the table at some time.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New Spanish Builds, Part One #135847
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Volunteer,

    Thank you, and yes you do need a good brush and a relatively steady hand to get a reasonable line, especially on the resin hulls, not so much on the plastic, as the resin tends to have more of those slight imperfections that can distort a line at any stage requiring a bit of adjustment afterwards.

    Thanks again

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New Spanish Builds, Part One #135755
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks Jeff, yes she is quite an imposing size alongside my other first rates.

    Me too, I learn stuff when writing these posts, which is as it should be, and I knew the Spanish navy built quite a few of their major ships down in Cuba, but hadn’t realised that the biggest one had been built there, which just goes to show what an important base it was, with a key role, not only adding units to the Spanish fleet, but in defending their gold and silver shipments that underpinned the whole show.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New British Builds, Part Four #135390
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    Thank you and well done you for sharing your methods and encouraging other folks to have a go.

    Keep up the good work

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New British Buids, Part Two #134824
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Excellent, at this rate I will have to start buying shares in Warlord Games!

    JJ

    Darkest Star – Thank you, much appreciated.

    I’m not aware of many cutting out attacks by the French and Spanish if any. The tactic is typical of an aggressive stance with a refusal by one side to engage the other in open water and seek the defence of the shore line and any defences nearby often meant that the Franco-Spanish were using that tactic to offset their inherent disadvantages in crew quality and ship handling.

    I am currently reading ‘Far Distant Ships’ which looks at the activities of the British Channel Squadron, and in that study of operations it is clear that the frustrations of blockade work in all weathers and a desire to deal with a growing threat, induced the British commanders to harass the enemy with cutting out operations and the occasional use of fire ships and bomb vessels to attack larger enemy bases and gatherings of ships.

    I should be finished at the end of the month to do a review of the book if you are interested.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New British Buids, Part Two #134712
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Get on Jeff, I can see you are having a whale of a time

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New British Buids, Part Two #134684
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thank you, and brilliant, I am sure will enjoy the transition to the larger scale, and I look forward to seeing them.

    Enjoy

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: 1/700th Frigate… #134626
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Bravo, Jeff, love the work.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – British Builds, Part One #133466
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    Welcome to wargaming Age of Sail in the Grand Manner, it sounds like you are hooked!

    If you don’t want to use the plastic ratlines, there are the etched brass offerings from Meridian and I have seen a device for stretching lines of thread over to create the pattern, on one of the 3D printed ship sites.

    The work Tom Jensen did pulling together the ship stats for WbS is truly impressive and as you say worth the cost of the rules for that alone, that said we have had a lot of fun messing about with them and Tom has been very generous in observing and commenting on a bunch of inveterate rule adaptors as we have played about with his core system, but I think that argues in some way to their strength in that you can tailor the rules to what you want without losing the essence of what attracted you in the first place.

    Like you, we have had conversations about the cluster of markers that can blossom around models as the game proceeds, but there is the option to use record sheets instead and one of the chaps in our group thought about using different coloured mini-dice for crew, hull and rigging hits to carry on the bases as perhaps less obstrusive.

    I haven’t settled on any particular way yet and am focused on the playing and rule adaptions we are creating before getting into thar particular process, but I’d be  interested to see what you come up with.

    It sounds like you have plenty to get on with and I look forward. To seeing some pictures and a write up on the blog.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – British Builds, Part One #132989
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks for the comments chaps.

    There is nothing quite like seeing these ships up close and the inspiration seeing them creates when you sit down to model them. I think of it similarly to walking battlefields, to get a sense of scale when designing an historical scenario. Reading and seeing pictures is never enough or better than experiencing the actual thing or place itself.

    The anchors are indeed massive and immediately draw the eye when you see them stowed on the sides. They would most likely have been carried more horizontally in reality, but the model is a compromise between fixing them so that they are secure to be handled for wargaming whilst still capturing the look.

    As well as writing the blog as a personal journal of my hobby activities, it is also intended to encourage others to get involved and have a go, as I think the more of us that do, the better the hobby becomes for everyone. So I hope these posts will inspire that kind of response and I have put together videos and tutorials to try and better explain my own techniques to share any knowledge I have gleaned, often from others. In addition I have a contact form on the blog and will attempt to answer questions speedily.

     

     

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – British Builds, Part One #132842
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    I think the preservation of historical naval vessels is a problem throughout the developed world, where a public are interested in preserving for the nation, but governments and management bodies struggle to juggle the finances, contending with other equally or more pressing demands of the limited pot. It looks like its becoming an equally large problem protecting and preserving historical wrecks around the world from unscrupulous scrap metal reclaimers desecrating war-graves.

    I sadly missed visiting the USS Constitution when I was in Boston, but I guess being on honeymoon might have influenced that decision, and I did get to show my wife around Gettysburg! What can I say, she knew she was marrying a wargamer from day one.

    I hadn’t realised that Dewy’s Olympia was still around, which is interesting for me as I have visited Cartagena in Spain many times and the naval museum there together with the city monuments record the Spanish-American War which sparked an interest in that naval conflict that gets little coverage in the UK.

    I am planning to partly redress my missing out on the Constitution with a visit, later this year, to Pearl Harbour, which I am sure will be an interesting and moving experience and at some stage in the next few years a return to the mainland US is on the cards to visit these places I still have to do, with a few AWI battlefields and wargaming conventions I would like to take in. Needless to say, your ramblings have been very useful and noted.

    I’m not familiar with Chris Durbin, but I will certainly check him out, thank you.

     

    All the best

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Rorke’s Drift – Devon Wargames Group #132660
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thank you. No the regiments were organised as units so we could determine their break point for casualties.

    There were a lot of Zulus!

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New French Builds, Part Two #132656
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks for your comments chaps, much appreciated.

    The scale of the models is exactly 1:700th, so plenty of detail.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New French Builds #132483
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thank you chaps, glad you like my new additions, although no one has commented on my glaring error, but it leapt out at me on having a look at the pictures again. I tend to leave the anchors off while I am rigging and add them last and I noticed L’Aigle was missing hers, so that was sorted last night, ready for her fleet review!

    greg954- you had me quizzical about your reference until my wife showed me a new £20 note last night. It is indeed the last journey of the Temeraire by Turner, our new face on the currency, which I guess over half the population wouldn’t have a clue who or what either were!

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New French Builds #132459
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff, great, go for it, you only live once as they say! Oh and happy birthday when it comes.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – New French Builds #132457
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thank you.

    These are the models available in the French fleet box from Warlord games. Basically the frigates and 3rd rates are a generic plastic kit for which Warlord have produced metal galleries and figureheads for these named ships and they are planning a launch of others next month I think.

    If you check out the Warlord store you’ll see what I mean

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Target for Tonight – Mannheim Ludwigshaven #132348
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Yes indeed, once the campaign has been played to a conclusion, I will draw up a final draft of the rules we have used and put it out together with the Cyberboard module that I have used to moderate things and record the results as we have gone.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Target for Tonight – Mannheim Ludwigshaven #132325
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    No the rules are those written by David Wayne Thomas back in about 2000 when I picked up my original copy but have since been republished by John Curry as per the link to Amazon.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Target for Tonight – Mannheim Ludwigshaven #132291
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thank you.

    Yes, the last few games have had the background of an increased response from the Nachtjagd with improved tech being introduced, combined with some bad Pathfinder marking and weather over the target.

    The two aircraft were Lancasters which were notoriously difficult to bail out from. The rules model this by setting the G force at 5, meaning the first crew member to bail needs a 6 or more on a D10 to get out, failure increases the die roll by +1 for each following crew member, with the pilot going last. Not many pilots bail out.

    The other bomber types start on a G of 4 giving a moderately better chance of escaping.

    Damage picked up early in the flight often brings planes down later as the players roll a risk die for each damage point inflicted to see if they can keep the plane flying or if they lose control for every zone moved through. The aircraft mentioned had four such risk die to roll, with a ten percent chance on each one then requiring a pilot skill test if a failure occurs.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – Cape Ortegal #132096
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thank you, glad you enjoyed the read, we had a fun day playing. The mat is from Tiny Wargames, and the ships are indeed from the Black Sails range.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – Cape Ortegal #132077
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    The scenario played out just I hoped it would with just enough in it to keep both sides interested and focussed on getting a positive result.

    Thank you, my room has seen some fun times over the years and I am very fortunate in having a supportive wife who allows me to indulge myself in this rather daft hobby.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – Cape Ortegal #131989
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi, thanks, glad you enjoyed the post.

    Yes the period still held fast to standards of gallantry, and there are examples of frigate captains offering their opponents the opportunity to fire first before they replied in kind, and this courtesy paid by larger rated ships to those at least a couple of rates lower.

    That said when frigates did fire on a ship of the line they could expect to be dealt with robustly and indeed the British frigates at Ortegal formed a line of their own and doubled the French ships by sailing down the opposite side of the French squadron as Strachan’s 74’s engaged from the opposite side.

    In our game the fire from Phoenix hurt the Scipion but was not devastating. The return fire however wrecked the frigates rigging. If the French had been targeting the hull, Phoenix may well have been in a much worst state.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Rorke’s Drift – Devon Wargames Group #131475
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Ok, that assumption was based on someone leaving a comment on the blog saying they had found them there.

    The rules were a freely available set a few years ago and the author dropped a comment on the club blog the last time we used them. That original free set are the ones we use in the club.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Rorke’s Drift – Devon Wargames Group #131382
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks for your comments chaps, glad you enjoyed seeing the game.

    Nathaniel – I believe the rules are now available on Wargames Vault.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: PAW 2020 – Plymouth Association of Wargamers #130884
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Chaps,

    Thanks for your comments and glad you enjoyed the read.

    Jeff – Sorry mate, adoption is not an option, not with two sons, one still at and one just out of university still costing me an arm and a leg. However should you decide to make the trip to Blighty, I’m very happy to advise on any travel plans with regard to the show circuit and if we happen to bump into each other will buy you sandwich and a beer.

    regards all

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: PAW 2020 – Plymouth Association of Wargamers #130852
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Yes the cafe is still there. You can see the windows overlooking the main hall in my header picture.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea – First Games, New Rules #130317
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi AOS,

    Honestly, there is no conspiracy going on here.

    Yeah the rules have some interesting concepts that attracted me in particular, principally the different types of gun and their capabilities rather than, as a lot of rules tend to do, a gun factor for the broadside of a particular ship type.

    This makes for a much more interesting game in small ship to ship engagements such as the ones demonstrated, but would be rather cumbersome once the numbers of ships start to get past ten or more a side.

    However there are aspects of the rules I don’t care for, particularly when it comes to movement, where turning and moving straight are separated into distinct activities and so I looked at incorporating my own changes using cards or, as I intend to do, chits, to activate and combining the movement into one sequence with the addition of a small random element to take out the certainty of distance covered as presented in the original rules.

    If you are interested in seeing more about the original rules, follow the link on my blog post below the picture of the rules cover to Ostfront Publishing and from there to Wargames Vault where there is a link to a short video showing a small game being played where you can see the mechanisms in action. The latter I found the most useful as I started to see what I liked and what I thought I might want to change.

    The compendium of ships and the different gun load outs is a work of passion and worth picking up just for the information nicely put together, and the rules give a game that looks straightforward enough.

    I hope that helps

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Target for Tonight – Op 5, Hannover #129658
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi, thank you.

    Yes the random selection of crews and their capabilities adds another level of uncertainty to each op, which, with this one being in fairly close range and with a high turn out of planes, looked like a good opportunity for the bombers to cash in,

    In this case the poor target marking, and crew quality losses combined to make this a fairly neutral game, but an opportunity to increase the lead gone for Bomber Command. It leaves the campaign in an interesting position.

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Hi Chaps,

    That’s very kind of you to comment and I’m so glad you enjoyed the journey. I’m not sure I can add much to the wealth of literature out there already covering the Peninsular War, but blogging allows an opportunity to point, those who want to look at these places, at some ideas about how to do it and in ways that can make them come alive.

    We are so lucky that these Peninsular veterans left us a treasure trove of first hand accounts of events at places that we can still see today pretty much as they did, and frankly I can’t really add much to that other than to point at them as a must have accompaniment when visiting these sites.

    The more of us who travel to Spain and Portugal to visit these places the more likely they will be saved for future generations of visitors and that would be a great way to honour the memories of those who fought and died there.

    Happy Xmas

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Black Seas Rigging Guide #127780
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Great, I hope it proves useful.

    There are some key differences with rigging earlier periods where you don’t have a spanker sail with boom and gaff on the mizzen mast, so I would start with having a look at what others have done. I would imagine the rest of the set up would be broadly similar.

    Rod Langton has some pictures of his Anglo-Dutch models on his site, which look like he’s using the set set up, but you could always drop him a line.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Strange Sail in Sight #127620
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks chaps, glad you like them.

    Next up, are some French 74’s and a rigging tutorial.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: Roman Dorset #126884
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Great, glad it brought back some happy memories.

    Cheers

    JJ

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

    in reply to: All at Sea with Black Seas #126725
    carojoncarojon
    Participant

    Thanks chaps, much appreciated.

    Rigging these models is very straightforward and certainly not something that should put anyone off building them. Warlord have recently put up a video about putting on standing rigging which illustrates how relatively simple the process is. I will put up a step by step illustration on the blog about doing that and adding running rigging.

    JJ

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 3 weeks ago by carojoncarojon.

    http://jjwargames.blogspot.co.uk

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 220 total)