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  • in reply to: Experiences with 3d print-on-demand services #174812
    Fred B
    Participant

    I can recommend craftcloud3d.

    It is a kind of hub for independent printers. You upload your files, choose materials, color etc, and it will give you a quote and list of peeps who can fulfill your order. I ordered twice from them in the past and each time the service was great and the communication with the person printing my order was amazing.

    Not to mention, once you find a good printer you can just order from them directly in the future (many have their own websites where you can place orders, others you can reach through email) to save a little and give the printer a larger cut of the price (as I am sure craftcloud charges a percentage).

    in reply to: 3d printing, resins and health #173785
    Fred B
    Participant

    Sorry to hear about your experiences.

    I was thinking on and off about getting a resin printer for the last few years, but safety concerns are my biggest stopping point. After reading your story I think I will wait a bit longer. Not only I wouldn’t have a dedicated place for it, I would have to print in a bedroom (I live in an apartment) so I would have the lingering vapors to deal with on top of skin exposure.

    I’m kinda hopeful for this new kind of resin printing solution that prints inside a transparent container as developed by UC Berkeley. The technology will be open sourced later this year according to one of the authors so I hope consumer grade printers will follow shortly. I fell like this would be much safer, as it would limit exposure to resin. In my “pie in the sky” version of that product we would never need to pour the resin, just buy it in a transparent container, remove prints with some tongs and just pop the resin container back and print again.

    in reply to: Steampunk meets Hornby #168026
    Fred B
    Participant

    While I am glad to see more steampunk stuff, but this offering gives me strong just glue some gears on it (and call it steampunk) vibes.

    Honestly, I’m quite surprised that a model train company didn’t do that before. After all, trains are no-brainers connection when it comes to steampunk, and if they released some intro sets a decade or so ago (when steampunk was more popular), they could have attracted a whole new group of people to the hobby.

    I don’t think they will have many takers for those models, especially the sub-par building designs. But hey, it allowed me to share an old, but good video, so that’s something ๐Ÿ˜‰

     

    Guy: I just type in my emoticons: this is a colon followed by close brackets ๐Ÿ™‚ colon-P ๐Ÿ˜› and so on. They change into the images after you submit your post.

    You should also be able to type (or copy and paste, as I do on desktop) in any emoji, as they are part of the character set used online (work kinda like fonts). Here I googled train emoji, highlighted it as text, copy & paste: ๐Ÿš‚!

    Fred B
    Participant

    Ian: Thanks for the link. I’ve seen the model before, but sadly it’s not available in US (and I’m not able to make a bigger order right now to justify the shipping from UK). To be honest, making this tank was less about finding appropriate model for my game and more about getting into the grove of 3d modelling after quite a long break. It looked simple enough that I knew I could actually finish it in relatively short period of time (and I needed that to not get discouraged – it was a tough year in which I abandoned too many projects).

    As for the progress. The test print came out ok, although the movable side turrets are a bit of lost cause at this scale – so those are out for time being. I will share some pics once I throw some paint on it.

    Now that I know this thing actually prints I am making the model (with static turrets) available to download from thingiverse!

    I might add few more optional greebles in the next few days (e.g exhausts like those in the Malig Ball Tank), maybe alternative armaments. Any ideas?

    Fred B
    Participant

    Ganesha Games’ Of Armies and Hordes might work, although it doesn’t tick all the boxes.

    It doesn’t do the center and flanks, but nor does it use squares or hexes. Instead it uses areas that are signified with terrain on the tabletop. So a swamp might be an area, as well as a field or a town. Irregular Wars has a good post about the rules and shows how he makes the areas. This approach to movement should work fine for 28mm on a smaller table.

    Another thing that it doesn’t quite tick is that it was made as a fantasy ruleset. So it would probably do fine for ancients and medieval without much tweaking, but I am not sure how it would work for later eras.

    Although I haven’t played the game myself, I thought the area movement a clever solution that I want to test in the future – maybe it will be up to your liking as well. Even if you don’t use the system wholesale, I don’t think it would be hard to transplant the area mechanic into a different ruleset.

    Fred B
    Participant

    Really liking those – especially the kinder egg “silos!” The cables really add to those pieces – might have to print some of those cable/pipe makers myself.

     

     

    in reply to: Chicken Coop #163703
    Fred B
    Participant

    I’ve been following the blog daily since you posted here earlier this month and loving all the village clutter. I was a bit lazy about keeping up my builds, but I am planning on following some of your tutorials to make my own stuff.

    Looking forward to seeing your table after a full moth of re-cluttering ๐Ÿ™‚

    in reply to: New question in ye olde primer conversation #163589
    Fred B
    Participant

    It depends how much are you priming, but I had good experience with white gesso. It takes a bit longer to prime, because you brush it on, but the upside you can do it anywhere without worrying about ventilation and you can tint the gesso with acrylic paint to act as your base coat.

     

    in reply to: Ways to model 15mm thatched roofs? #163587
    Fred B
    Participant

    Didn’t even consider the fabric composition when thinking about towels – only texture. The texture on the ones I have (outside of some beach towels) is pretty “coarse” (well not coarse to the touch, it’s soft, but large) – which works good for drying, but I feel would be way out of scale for 15mm roofs. The store near me has the same texture on the limited towels they sell. It seems this approach would require some proper “towel shopping” to work, but maybe I am overthinking this?

    Anyway, I do have some air dry clay, so I think I will go with that for my first attempt this weekend when I finally have time to sit down and work on the hobby a bit.

    in reply to: Ways to model 15mm thatched roofs? #163570
    Fred B
    Participant

    I also used an old towel on my buildings and combed it through after I drenched it in PVA.

    Those look really good – did you use the run of the mill towels? The ones I have have this pretty thick texture (like this), but maybe it will shrink after PVA soak? Also, really like your table!

     

    One of the huts had a straw/grass roof. Guess not that good or you would have spotted it

    Nah Mike, the huts looked great – I was just scrolling quickly looking for your avatar on that page, but I think your hut was posted by Angel Barracks and I didn’t connect the dots ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Fred B
    Participant

    I confess to regularly doing that. I long ago found that when I drew my own map I tried to make it โ€˜interestingโ€™. But actually I just ended up making it โ€˜obviousโ€™ and real maps are far more interesting

    Agreed. Also, for this kind of solo experience, I feel if I made a map myself, I would remember what’s there when I played through it with the “fog of war” sheet.

    Fortunately I found a website of a Polish organization/society dedicated to preserving older maps. They scan those at high resolution and provide free access. There’s bunch of maps there from different sources, dating to early XX century, but most seem to be around WW2 era. Here’s an example set of maps made by the allied forces from the 60s. Any of the squares with red text have at least one scan. You can also check the dropdown list to choose a different set. With this and OS maps I should be fine for maps ๐Ÿ˜€

    in reply to: Ways to model 15mm thatched roofs? #163472
    Fred B
    Participant

    I have used model railway reeds, eg on the onager stable here, available in different colours. You may find them to be a little too โ€˜rusticโ€™ for your requirements, and maybe no cheaper than green stuff.

    One other thought would be to use paint brush bristles โ€“ not the W&N 0000 ones but the cheap wall painting ones. A six inch brush should last forever!

    Those are both good ideas. I probably have some old brushes I can sacrifice, but if not, I am able to get the woodland scenics reeds in US.

     

     

    I made some quick grass/straw roof models: https://www.thewargameswebsite.com/forums/topic/abs-15mm-fantasy-thing/page/4/ They were a bit of a rush job, but if you take more time than me they should be fine?

    Years ago I purchased a bag of paper-mache mix from the brick and mortar hobby shop. I cut cardboard circles to fit over my huts, mixed the pap-mach mix to a dry pulpy consistency (note, no paper, just the mix) and formed it into cones on top of the cardboard circles. Let it dry a little bit and then slashed at them with an X-acto knife to give it a thatch pattern. Worked pretty well, actually. You could probably do the same with some air-dry clay, I would think.

    I haven’t seen your roofs in the topic Mike, but the huts in there looked quite good. This gives me me hope trying it with clay with the method Jeff described. I have also found a video from Mel, the terrain tutor showing similar clay + knife method, and I think if I use an exacto (which will be thinner than the utility knife Mel uses) I can make it work in 15mm.

    Well, now I have 2 methods I want to try! Thank you all!

    Fred B
    Participant

    For maps Iโ€™m not sure where in the world you are, assuming the US or Canada. For people in the UK, a lot of second hand book shops and even charity shops will have second hand O/S maps. For this campaign theyโ€™re often better, being older and less built up and closer to the situation back in WW2.

    I am in US now, but am originally from Poland, so I want to try to find some Polish maps. I found a Polish government body that does the same thing as Ordinance Survey in UK, but it seems maps are available upon request, but they have some samples of modern maps. I will send an email and look for more info. If not, I can use some of the Scottish maps Ruarigh (thank you Ruarigh – those are super handy!) recommended and build my scenario around that. As I am playing imagi-nations, I can just pretend that it isn’t Scotland ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Iโ€™m glad I introduced you to Peter Pig. They do a lot of nice figures for a lot of periods. They also tend to do a period well with lots of choice, rather than flitting constantly between them leaving you with ranges with gaps

    I already knew of Peter Pig, and picked up some of theirs minis through ebay in US (I lucked out and got some WW1 Polish) and as my game takes place in 20s-30s I was mainly looking their WW1 offering, but I love their WW2 selection with all those niche minis (like soldiers on bicycles or Brits just having tea)!

    Fred B
    Participant

    Well – this is awesome!

    I really enjoyed reading through this scenario and it made me finally pick up a copy of Hell & Uncivil disorder! As someone relatively new to wargames AND before recent months was only aware of GW style tournament play this kind of play is exactly what I was after. Here I was, trying to find ways to blend (well, duct tape more like it) solo rpgs with solo wargames and there are wargamers who have been playing like this already ๐Ÿ™‚ I am definitely planning on using this scenario in my solo imagi-nation campaign.

    Also, love the procedure of making a “window” for the map. Although, I am not sure where I could get maps from, and would welcome recommendations. I would prefer maps I could print out myself, but I am also happy to buy an atlas if needed ๐Ÿ™‚

    Finally, thank you for recommending miniatures to use. I never really investigated Peter Pigs WW2 offerings, but there are some great niche models in there. Might need to make an order soon and hope I can across the pond before the Christmas slow downs will kick in.

    in reply to: Would THIS Landspeeder work for 15mm? #163418
    Fred B
    Participant

    Thank you for posting the comparison pics – now I will be on a lookout for one of those. Don’t currently have anything 15mm sci-fi, but I probably will in the future, so picking up a cheapo speeder now seems like a no-brainer ๐Ÿ˜‰

    in reply to: I slapped some paint on some plastic #163417
    Fred B
    Participant

    Oooh, I love how it came out. The contrast between the (tardis?) blue and rust and copper/bronze is great!

    I don’t have a good sludge recipe, but would love to learn your rust recipe – love the look and would like to recreate it on some silos I am working on.

    in reply to: Ways to model 15mm thatched roofs? #163416
    Fred B
    Participant

    Yeah, I haven’t considered steel/wire wool rusting – that’s a good point.ย  I think even if I soaked it in PVA to seal it all in it might rust. I wonder if anyone did any tests with longevity of it in wargaming.

    So far I am leaning towards clay. Your idea of using the wool for texture is great, I just wonder if the airdry clay I have will keep the texture enough before it dries. I could use some of the greenstuff I have, but that would make those roofs quite expensive.

     

    in reply to: 10mm 3D printed lit city #162915
    Fred B
    Participant

    I am soo jealous of all the machines he has! I browsed some of his other videos as well and I would really like to try digital kitbashing with a VR headset, but honestly I would be happy with *just* the resin printer and laser cutter ๐Ÿ˜‰ (as I already have a budget FDM printer). It also makes me want to learn more 3d modelling so I can make my own printable terrain.

    I do like the table he made. I agree, it might not be great for “mass” battle, but I could totally see “warbands” consisting of a single warmaster style base (or even better, just handful of minis on a round base) running around that table and fighting.

    in reply to: Re-clutter your life and wargames table #162531
    Fred B
    Participant

    Don’t have any pig minis, but I so want to make a pig pen!

    I guess I will be checking your blog daily this month ๐Ÿ˜‰ I am currently working on making some 15mm countryside terrain and was pretty slow about it, but your blog is giving me strength and motivation to make more stuff! I already learned a cool way of making small structure by gluing them on a sheet of paper and cutting them out. No more fiddling with tiny structures as they dry. Thanks for that.

    I probably won’t be able to keep up your pace, but I am definitely trying that root cellar tomorrow ๐Ÿ™‚

    in reply to: I am the LORE!!! #162530
    Fred B
    Participant

    Maybe it’s because I am coming from an RPG background, but I never seen lore as law, more like an inspiration. Even if we play in a well established IP (let’s say Star Wars), we play in *our* version of the world – not the official one. Many things are the same, but there will be differences. Even in my early RPG days when I played all Warhammer, all the time, we just kinda took the setting as a general inspiration and we made up the details as we needed.

    So I agree with pretty much everyone here: your figures, your house, your rules. As long as all players have fun, you are playing it the right way ๐Ÿ™‚

    Fred B
    Participant

    Thank you all ๐Ÿ™‚ Those comments make my day!

    Since the last post I dusted off my 3d printer as I found an appropriate house (it’s like a minor nobility or a landlord’s house) and painted that up. I definitely prefer scratch building, but it is a good way to add some more variety to the table (and it is great for tiny detail like windows!). I am now thinking about modelling some appropriate buildings from around my hometown (it was pretty rural in early XX century there) and adding them to my setup. Also, I can then share them for others to print if they want.

    Anyway, here’s some pics I took of the house I printed. Don’t really have one without the barn, so you will need to look at it again. Sorry ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Andrew: I took part in few UK steampunk meetups around 2010 (especially the Asylum). I think the book you recommended might be newer, as I don’t recognize it or the author. Too bad I am not in UK anymore, I would love ti listen to his reading.

    Oh and as you can see the base lifting a bit on the barn. I chamfered the edges, but then proceeded to add too much flock (as I covered the first layer in PVA and it turned out too dark, so I added more), so it is a little tall. Well, you live and learn – the next base will be better. Also, I think it will look OK once I setup the whole table on my green felt ๐Ÿ™‚ I can always imagine the barn sits on a tiny hill ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Next on my agenda – a small tower/granary type of structure, as I want to try my hand at making brick/stone texture with clay.

     

    I canโ€™t wait to see more of this, whatโ€™s next? Looks like someone been jumping out off that barn window on a regular basis from how worn the ground is. Someone snugging in to visit the farmerโ€™s daughter maybe?

    My idea was that this where where the use a pulley to get the bales of hay upstairs, so there would be bunch people trampling the ground there… but I like your explanation much more ๐Ÿ˜€

    in reply to: Oddest campaign map ever? #162124
    Fred B
    Participant

    This seems like a really cool idea (especially like the idea of a third party going in and moving some cards around), but it could get pricey. They want like $50 here in US for one of those plastic storage organizers ๐Ÿ˜ฎ Even the craft matchboxes are not that cheap.

    I am wondering if something similar couldn’t be done with just index cards organized into stacks? As long as you have somewhere they can just sit undisturbed it could work. It won’t be as neat as a nice organizer, but should be functional. Or maybe make a kind of longbox for those cards that works like a card catalog with tabs for each region? You can make a box to size with something a single piece of foamcore, or even reuse some cardboard you already have.

    No matter what, I would love to hear how it goes Andrew. Really interested in this procedure and how it can be used in a longer form campaign ๐Ÿ™‚

    in reply to: Wargames As An Investment? #162020
    Fred B
    Participant

    I’m with Alex on this one – the idea alone makes me sad.

    I’ve seen what “going into a hobby to get rich” did to retro gaming. As a quick example – there was a recent scam/publicity stunt selling Super Mario 64 $1.5M to push more people to “grade” their collections. This is on top of crazy elevated prices that were climbing over past decade or so. I just hope it won’t happen in our crook of the woods.

    If anything, I can see this happening with GW products. There’s already a bit of old school movement with GW games, making people interested in older models (and ebay sellers happily capitalizing on that interest), but even contemporary GW makes their starter packs in such limited quantities to basically encourage scalpers. But as I don’t play GW games or plan to support their business it doesn’t really hurt me.

    Personally I get stuff because I want to use it in my games. If someone buys things only to later sell it for profit that’s their right, but personally I think those people are doing a disservice to the hobby.

    in reply to: Ever Happy? #161890
    Fred B
    Participant

    As a newbie to the hobby I don’t really have a “chosen system” yet, butย  it’s really interesting to read others’ opinions. I do however make up my own rules as I play. It’s similar to how I run my RPGs, just a simple mechanic and rulings and procedures. Because of that I really enjoy reading rulesย  and grabbing ideas and procedures to use in my own games.

    Now I found a copy of the WWII rules Guy mentioned, so I will give those a read ๐Ÿ™‚

     

    Fred B
    Participant

    I ended up adding the base to the barn. I am not 100% happy with it – I think it came out too thick as I got too flock happy, but you live and learn – the next one will be better ๐Ÿ™‚ I ended up adding the scythe, shovel (pretty much invisible because I glued it too close to the wall), as well as the trough (in the back). I also got some flowers to add some visual interest.

    Overall I am pretty happy with it. I might try a smaller base for the next building, but go lighter with flocking.

    Also, should read a bit more about taking better pictures, as I think the barn looks better IRL than what the harsh lighting of my kitchen counter makes it out to be ๐Ÿ˜›

    in reply to: Innsmouth 15mm / Cthulhu #161730
    Fred B
    Participant

    Love your setups Ben (discovered them last year or so and went through everything I could find of yours)! Glad to see more of the 15mm Cthulhu ๐Ÿ™‚ I am working on some 15mm pulp(ish) game myself, so I am always happy to steal ideas get inspired by work of others and do something similar for my table.

    I wouldn’t mind getting some of the same minis, I see some khurasan minis there, but I don’t recognize others (like the men in suits and hats). Would you mind sharing what are the minis you’re using for this game?

    Also, there’s an arrow on the pic implying that there’s another pic after a click and it took me waaaaaay to long to realize it is part of the picture and not an actual button. Would love to see the 2nd pic tho ๐Ÿ˜€

    in reply to: Slow mind = small games -> Buildings painted #161568
    Fred B
    Participant

    Really enjoying your foray into block wargames. I am planning on doing some myself in the future, because I just love the idea of moving wooden blocks on a printed map. I am not sure why, but the fact that it’s both representative and abstract at same time really appeals to me… and also let’s me feel like some general in the HQ planning moves ๐Ÿ˜€

    Any thoughts on tracking / reducing damage for defending units???

    I am not sure if this will work for the rules you’re using, but I am a big fan of the advantage/disadvantage mechanic that got popular in RPGs. Basically if you are at an disadvantage (you suffered the half hit) you roll an extra die (so 2d6 if you rolled a d6 before) and keep the lower. It is not as harsh as simply cutting a die in half (you can still roll double sixes which means your lower die will be 6), but generally it shows the unit is not fighting at full strength.

    To keep track which units suffered a “half-hit” I would simply turn the piece upside down (so the “front facing” arrow is not touching the ground). This way you can still do your normal facing, but is easy to see which unit is in disarray from suffering a half-hit so you know exactly when you need to roll 2d6 and keep the lower.

    Fred B
    Participant

    Jim: Thank you ๐Ÿ™‚ Yes, I am having a blast making those – already planning more!

    Thomaston: Well, now you are making me think I might want to base the barn after all. I do like the basing on the shed, and it was fun to do. The main reason I thought against it for the shed was “what if I want to use it on something else than grass in the future), but honestly – what other surface will shed be?

    As for the interior, the roof lifts up so you can put minis there, but it’s just blank on the inside. I think it’s a tad too small to make a proper inside. I will keep it in mind for some bigger buildings tho ๐Ÿ™‚

    I will experiment today a bit and see if I will go with a base for the barn. Then onto the next building!

    in reply to: Age of fantasy: regiments 10mm #161449
    Fred B
    Participant

    Those look awesome! Keep us posted when you paint them.

    I am glad that the seller is not in the US, because I would have bought some of those even before I got my 15mm game off the ground ๐Ÿ˜› but looking at all the cool 10mm stuff on this forum, I do want to get some armies done eventually.

    Fred B
    Participant

    I know we โ€˜old handsโ€™ are supposed to offer encouragement, but please donโ€™t do any more building or painting, youโ€™re already making us look badโ€ฆ

    You’re too kind. The main reason I put extra effort into those builds is because I was inspired by creations from people on this forum – including yours! (One day I hope to make something as elaborate as your palace!).

    I would fix a flat(ish) something flat on the floor against the side of the building. Perhaps a plank, an old door, a felled tree trunk waiting to be chopped into firewood, or maybe a trough, then put the tools in/on that.

    I really like that idea! I think I will make a tiny troth and place the tools inside. Because with a troth I can glue it neatly to the wall AND sneak in a piece of paper/tape underneath to hold it from the bottom for added stability. I might also make some old doors to lean against the barn for a little more detail on the other side. Thanks!

    Fred B
    Participant

    15mm barn and shed - mini for scale

    First pieces of terrain for the campaign (and first time building terrain in general).

    I am starting with some central European countryside stuff as I want to start with some folk feel to the campaign (and going into some folk horror). I got my hands on some coffee stirrers and matchsticks, watched some videos on terrain making and I am pretty happy with the outcome. The shed is done, I still want to detail the barn. I made a tiny scythe and shovel and want to use them. My original plan was to base the barn like the shed, but after painting it up I kinda like the “unbased” look. The original idea is to have the tiny tools leaning against the barn (glued both at the barn point of contact and the ground), but not sure how to make it safe and secure without a base. Any ideas?

    Next I want to make some kitchen scrubber hedges and get a doormat for some fields and those wheat stacks ๐Ÿ™‚ Then to other farm buildings (with maybe some weird elements to reinforce the setting).

    Fred B
    Participant

    I am now watching a What a Tanker video – man, that’s a neat little system, and it gives a nice automata for enemy behavior. Thanks for recommending it!

    I think I will pick up the book in the future and get some enemy mechs for pure mech on mech combat. But this might be down the line as even the pdf is on a pricier side.

    Also, your solo rules sound really neat. You should write them down and share or sell them – I am sure others would enjoy them ๐Ÿ™‚ I know for me seeing others solo wargaming procedures is a huge help for making my own campaigns.

    Fred B
    Participant

    Cacique Caribe: Thanks, I am glad you like them ๐Ÿ™‚ Outland Models look pretty good, but it seems they are shipping from China, which I would rather not ship just few tiny resin bits halfway around the world. I wonder if they are any vendors who either sell stls, or offer similar ones printed more locally. I don’t have a resin printer, but I used some local-ish services to print from stl for me in the past (like the mechs above). Will go and investigate. While I like the idea of making terrain from scratch, having some printed terrain to “bulk up” the table is not a bad idea.

    Thomaston: Oh, I kinda forgot that coffee stirrers are a thing! I have some Popsicle sticks so I was thinking of that when talking about cutting them lenghtwise. I think coffee stirrers would be good thickness right out of the box. Maybe a little bigger than “real scale” but like you said, it would be easier to recognize and more in line with the minis, who are not real scale after all ๐Ÿ™‚ Will pick some up next time I am at a store.

    I should check out Blade & Lockpick and What A Tanker (those are the only two rulesets of the ones you mention I don’t know anything about). I will probably just pick up the former, as Nordic Weasel is pretty much a safe bet with me. Could you tell me what the resolution mechanic in What A Tanker is like?

    …and when you get some steampunky stuff do share! I might mix in some steampunkery into my campaign

    Fred B
    Participant

    Thomaston: Thanks for the link, those buildings look really good. I might start with something similar, for a bit of that central/eastern Europe village feel. I was thinking of starting my games more “local” (some border skirmishes with the Germans, investigating slavic myths, etc.) and get more into globetrotting aspects once I get some appropriate minis. But sheds, fences etc will always come in handy. I think I should cut the stir sticks lengthwise so they are more to scale, right?

    As for rules – nothing is set in stone yet, but I am taking advice from games like Squad Hammer and War Story. Right now I am thinking no stats, just coming up with target numbers on the fly based on the character and narrative. This is what I already do when I play solo RPGs and it works well for me. I think I will use small “fireteams” as units + some characters ans steal the Pinned/Suppressed/Out from Crossfire for firefight outcomes (I am not a fan of straight out removing figures/units after each attack). What kind of rules do you use for your solo games?

    Tony S: Thanks! I am glad to hear that I don’t need to spend hundred+ dollars on paint alone. I will still probably pick few hobby paint colors, as I am finding it hard to get good coverage from some of the fancier colors in craft paint.

    Yeah, the big reason I decided to go with this interwar-ish Dieselpunk was because of those robots. I found the stl and got them printed via online service, because I just wanted to have them in my games – they just sparked my imagination so much. I might have a go at designing some printable robots myself in the future.

    in reply to: Itโ€™s back – Hellfire #159108
    Fred B
    Participant

    I wrote up a bit about Hellfire ages ago that might answer the various questions here: https://ooh-shiny-complex.blogspot.com/2019/02/hellfire-hell-on-dodgsons-world.html

    We also played the Dodgsonโ€™s World scenarios and campaign, which you can follow on my blog: https://ooh-shiny-complex.blogspot.com/search/label/Hellfire

    Thank you for sharing those ๐Ÿ™‚ It seems that the system is not really my cup of tea (not a fan of multiplication and division around the table), but the scenarios look quite fun. Hopefully the scenario books will get released in the future ๐Ÿ™‚

    in reply to: Itโ€™s back – Hellfire #159056
    Fred B
    Participant

    It seems it’s also available digitally from Amazon, WargameVault… and even Barnes&Noble! Seems like the author is bringing it back it full swing!

    There’s a lot of love for this ruleset on various wargaming forums, but I couldn’t find any review or other concrete info about it anywhere. What makes this system special?

    in reply to: What is a narrative wargame? #158924
    Fred B
    Participant

    For what it’s worth, having an established vocabulary or jargon is helpful, especially when doing research or communicating ideas (it uses term X and term Y to achieve Z). Not sure where the TLA trend comes from, but I can tell you that at least it is relatively easy to research online… and sure, all of this can be co-opted into marketing, but honestly, capitalism is really good at repackaging ideas and reselling them back to you – label or not.

    Guy: Thanks for your recommendations. The Wargame Developments Handbook will come especially handy when trying to familiarize myself with the hobby. I also picked up Ivan’s War Story, and both this and Muggergame seem very close to what I was thinking of when talking about capturing the spirit of Free Kriegsspiel (and also a good example of what *I* consider a narrative game). The former is especially similar to how I imagined my game (although I am not a fan of rolling single d6 – it lacks the more tactile feel of even 2d6).

    I suspect โ€˜narrativeโ€™ (war)gaming is as much a state of mind and approach as anything else.

    I think you hit the nail on the head over here. You can run pretty much any game with a narrative mindset, but games like War Story pretty much force you to play in that style. This is why I would call it a “Narrative Wargame,” while others are only wargames that you play narratively.

    Fred B
    Participant

    I am really enjoying the progress Alex. I am looking forward to seeing them painted. As someone who just started with minis, and opted for 15mm (also because of storage, but also nostalgia, as I had tiny army men back when I was a kid, which I enjoyed much more than the standard 1/72? ones), 10mm painting kinda scares me ๐Ÿ˜€

    @Ian: Thanks for sharing the rampart system. I just noticed they are Pay What You Want, so I will be checking them out, as I am always interested in smaller/simpler wargames ๐Ÿ™‚

    in reply to: What is a narrative wargame? #158866
    Fred B
    Participant

    Personally I am unaware what came came first OSR or OSW, mainly because I wasn’t really following the wargaming world back then. I recall OSR dedicated blogs around 2005, with one still online dating to 2008. For what it’s worth, the OSR players in 2000s were playfully called grognards, so take that as you will.

    @Mike: The rules lite aspect of OSR (and more so of FKR) is what I am looking for in wargaming as well (actually, the complex rules is why I haven’t really got into wargames earlier, as I tried in 2000s and 2010s, but only recently with the rise of indie rulesets I found stuff I actually could enjoy). There’s good discourse in RPG side of things about how less rules increase realism and let you do more (on wargame side I am only familiar with John Bobebk’s book that tackles similar ideas – but, again, I am a newbie to the hobby). This infinite possibility space, unburdened by rules is the crux behind FKR (Free Kriegsspiel Revolution)… wargamers might recognize the name. FKR borrows from Verdy du Vernois’ take on the original Prussian Kriegsspiel (also from other places, like Engle Matrix Games) and incorporates them into RPG. But, I don’t want to hijack the topic to talk about RPG stuff (I can talk ad infinitum about RPG theory), so let’s turn into wargames.

    I think what I am after is FKR wargame… not traditional Free Kriegsspiel per se, just something in that spirit: more freeflowing, and preferably not requiring an umpire. No luck finding one so far, but as soon as I finish my minis and get some terrain I will do some tests using some of the procedures I use to run my FKR RPGs.


    @Phil
    , Guy: I get what you mean with terminology being ever-changing. Similar things happen in RPG (I mean, OSR means something else now than it did even a decade ago) but the meanings stay somewhat similar. I wonder what makes those two communities so different. There is plenty of discourse in RPG world (including questioning what even is RPG), but some general level of consensus is usually reached… even if it sprouts a new movement or niche. Maybe it has something to do with wargames being antagonistic at its core (you VS me), and RPGs being collaborative (we are working together to tell/explore a story…well, at least after the 80s/90s where the idea of antagonistic GM was in the zeitgeist)?

    I guess my best course of action to start my own term and hope for the best. So I might hijack FKR ideas and make myself a wargames ruleset. It won’t have the chrome many wargamers are after, but it at least should have color (as someone in this thread mentioned earlier) ๐Ÿ™‚

    in reply to: What is a narrative wargame? #158834
    Fred B
    Participant

    @Mike: The OSR (Old School Renaissance) is a movement in RPG that goes back to the roots of the hobby. Originally it was people making new materials for the old versions of D&D (including rewriting/reorganizing those old rules in new, more accessible ways), but it moved beyond that. Nowadays something doesn’t have to strictly adhere to OD&D mechanics or even its tropes to be considered OSR. New mechanics and settings can be OSR, as long as they keep the spirit of it. So we are talking light on rules, but heavy on rulings (GM making calls how to tackle current issue on the fly), pretty low powered characters (so players are forced to think inside the game world/narrative to find solutions VS looking at their character sheet for powers that will solve the issue for them) and general sense of adventure and exploration. When many new systems are “digital” (you need to have X skill/power/whatever to do Y), OSR games are more analogue (as long as you find a clever approach, you can do Y). Maze Rats (by Ben Milton) is a short and sweet OSR game that is a great example showing what OSR is about.

    But, here’s the kicker.

    It doesn’t *really* matter what the definition of OSR is. Because it’s a new term, you get am idea of what I am talking about even if you don’t know exactly what it is. What’s more important, you can ask and research it much easier. Sure, some details will differ between sources, but all will agree on what the “spirit” or “feel” of OSR is. This is what I would love to have for narrative wargaming.

    …but, as Martin says, it might be hard to achieve a consensus in wargaming world ๐Ÿ™‚

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